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Sam Rockwell

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December 30, 2002 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
It's not as if Sam Rockwell wasn't prepared. He had read game-show icon Chuck Barris' "unauthorized autobiography," "Confessions of a Dangerous Mind." He had gone over the script for the movie based on it a million times, it seemed. He watched old "Gong Show" tapes, including rehearsal tapes, to hone Barris' Philly accent and alternately authoritative and nebbishy mannerisms. Still, when it came time to shoot, the pressure was nerve-racking, Rockwell says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2014 | By John Horn
PARK CITY, Utah -- Megan, a young woman about to move on to the next chapter in her life, makes some borderline decisions in "Laggies. " Played by Keira Knightley in a Sundance Film Festival feature from director Lynn Shelton, Megan isn't sure she's ready to get married, isn't sure what she wants to do for a career, and isn't sure what she really thinks of a single man she meets (played by Sam Rockwell). In an ensemble that includes Chloe Grace Moretz and Kaitlyn Dever as high school students, Mark Webber as Megan's boyfriend and Jeff Garlin as Megan's father, "Laggies" (a high school nickname for somebody who's lagging behind)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2008 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
Clark GREGG, one of those actors everyone recognizes as the strait-laced good guy -- see also: "The West Wing," "The New Adventures of Old Christine" -- was looking for his first film project to direct. Then “Choke,” the fourth novel by "Fight Club" scribe Chuck Palahniuk (rhymes with "politic") came his way: a heartwarming tale of a sex addict whose mother is lost in dementia and who, as Gregg puts it, "deliberately chokes on food so that he can form parasitic relationships with the wealthy people who Heimlich him."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
In a heart-rending scene from Fox Searchlight's "The Way, Way Back," 14-year-old Duncan is asked to rate himself on a scale of 1 to 10 by his mother's emotionally cruel boyfriend. A "6," the boy grudgingly replies after some thought. You're more of a "3," the boyfriend retorts, delivering the blow Duncan knew must be coming. When Liam James, who plays Duncan in the film opening this holiday weekend, rates himself, he has a little more fun with the idea. The 17-year-old actor, who also has recurring roles on AMC's "The Killing" and USA's "Psych," plays down his rising star.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1999 | TOM GILBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the casual moviegoer, it may come as a surprise that William "Wild Bill" Wharton, the unnerving, psychotic convict in "The Green Mile," and Guy Fleegman, the faux slickster convention host/bit player in "Galaxy Quest," are both portrayed by the same actor: Sam Rockwell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Sam Rockwell, the critically acclaimed actor who was most recently seen as the villainous Justin Hammer in "Iron Man 2," is scheduled to appear in person Saturday evening at the American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre for a screening of his upcoming drama, "Conviction," in which he plays a man wrongly imprisoned for murder. The event is part of a celebration of Rockwell's eclectic career, kicking off Friday at the Cinematheque's Aero Theatre in Santa Monica with a double feature of 2002's "Confessions of a Dangerous Mind," the George Clooney-directed film in which the actor portrays game show guru Chuck Barris, and 2009's "Moon," featuring Rockwell as an astronaut alone on Earth's nearby neighbor.
NEWS
November 11, 2010 | By Lisa Rosen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Betty Anne Waters spent almost two decades trying to free her brother Kenny from prison, where he was serving a life sentence for a crime she was sure he didn't commit. On the surface, "Conviction" is the true story about the lengths a sister will go to save her brother. But the film delves far below that surface. As acted by Hilary Swank, the loyalty Betty Anne has for Kenny is almost superhuman. Her journey is complicated because Kenny is as engaging as he is volatile, and as embodied by Sam Rockwell, that combination could very well be lethal.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2014 | By John Horn
PARK CITY, Utah -- Megan, a young woman about to move on to the next chapter in her life, makes some borderline decisions in "Laggies. " Played by Keira Knightley in a Sundance Film Festival feature from director Lynn Shelton, Megan isn't sure she's ready to get married, isn't sure what she wants to do for a career, and isn't sure what she really thinks of a single man she meets (played by Sam Rockwell). In an ensemble that includes Chloe Grace Moretz and Kaitlyn Dever as high school students, Mark Webber as Megan's boyfriend and Jeff Garlin as Megan's father, "Laggies" (a high school nickname for somebody who's lagging behind)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2013 | By Susan Stone
BERLIN -- Contrary to the title, there are many shots in David M. Rosenthal's film “A Single Shot,” world-premiering Saturday at the Berlin International Film Festival.  But the one that sets this story in motion takes place in the first few minutes of the movie.  John Moon (Sam Rockwell) intently hunts a deer through a damp forest, but ends up hitting the wrong target, in cold mud. His shotgun blast catches Ingrid (Christie Burke), who, like John, is in the wrong place.  She's hiding out in the nature conservancy where he has been poaching deer and pheasant.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Scruffy and sloppy, and not without a filthy charm, "Choke" is writer-director Clark Gregg's adaptation of Chuck Palahniuk's 2001 novel of sex addiction and mother issues, and it plays out not unlike its central character's life: fumbling toward sentimental closure but ironically surer-footed on matters of debauchery and comic meanness. Lizardy indie stalwart Sam Rockwell takes his gift for sardonic aloofness to new heights as Victor, an adolescent-minded hedonist with a serious case of the pretends.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
To begin talking about the new indie film "The Way, Way Back," I want to go way, way back. Praise for the movie's excellent cast, anchored by Sam Rockwell, Toni Collette, Steve Carell, Allison Janney and teenage rock Liam James, will come later. As good as the actors are, we must begin with the originality of the screenplay by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash. The writers, who also co-direct and have small roles in the film, take a fairly straightforward story of coming of age in a time of divorce, with all the frictions that arise as kids find themselves dealing with mom and dad's new loves, but they make it feel fresh.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2013 | By Susan Stone
BERLIN -- Contrary to the title, there are many shots in David M. Rosenthal's film “A Single Shot,” world-premiering Saturday at the Berlin International Film Festival.  But the one that sets this story in motion takes place in the first few minutes of the movie.  John Moon (Sam Rockwell) intently hunts a deer through a damp forest, but ends up hitting the wrong target, in cold mud. His shotgun blast catches Ingrid (Christie Burke), who, like John, is in the wrong place.  She's hiding out in the nature conservancy where he has been poaching deer and pheasant.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Both literally and metaphorically, "Seven Psychopaths" is a shaggy dog story. Not only is an actual shaggy dog, a tiny Shih Tzu, the cynosure of all eyes here, but the film's rambling narrative meanders into all kinds of haphazard story lines that are simultaneously audacious, anarchic and random. If the name of writer-director Martin McDonagh is familiar, you sort of know what to expect. McDonagh, a celebrated Irish playwright ("The Lieutenant of Inishmore," "The Beauty Queen of Leenane")
NEWS
November 11, 2010 | By Lisa Rosen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Betty Anne Waters spent almost two decades trying to free her brother Kenny from prison, where he was serving a life sentence for a crime she was sure he didn't commit. On the surface, "Conviction" is the true story about the lengths a sister will go to save her brother. But the film delves far below that surface. As acted by Hilary Swank, the loyalty Betty Anne has for Kenny is almost superhuman. Her journey is complicated because Kenny is as engaging as he is volatile, and as embodied by Sam Rockwell, that combination could very well be lethal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Conviction" ? "Conviction," starring Hilary Swank and Sam Rockwell, is an exceedingly earnest ripped-from-the-headlines story of a sister's saving grace and the salvation possible with DNA typing. It follows the prison saga of Kenny Waters (Rockwell), a good ole rural Massachusetts boy serving a life sentence for a murder he contends he didn't commit, and the extraordinary measures his sister Betty Anne (Swank) takes to fight that conviction. Yet the film falls short of delivering the outrage and uplift that should have come easy for this true-life fight against justice denied.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Sam Rockwell, the critically acclaimed actor who was most recently seen as the villainous Justin Hammer in "Iron Man 2," is scheduled to appear in person Saturday evening at the American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre for a screening of his upcoming drama, "Conviction," in which he plays a man wrongly imprisoned for murder. The event is part of a celebration of Rockwell's eclectic career, kicking off Friday at the Cinematheque's Aero Theatre in Santa Monica with a double feature of 2002's "Confessions of a Dangerous Mind," the George Clooney-directed film in which the actor portrays game show guru Chuck Barris, and 2009's "Moon," featuring Rockwell as an astronaut alone on Earth's nearby neighbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Conviction" ? "Conviction," starring Hilary Swank and Sam Rockwell, is an exceedingly earnest ripped-from-the-headlines story of a sister's saving grace and the salvation possible with DNA typing. It follows the prison saga of Kenny Waters (Rockwell), a good ole rural Massachusetts boy serving a life sentence for a murder he contends he didn't commit, and the extraordinary measures his sister Betty Anne (Swank) takes to fight that conviction. Yet the film falls short of delivering the outrage and uplift that should have come easy for this true-life fight against justice denied.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Both literally and metaphorically, "Seven Psychopaths" is a shaggy dog story. Not only is an actual shaggy dog, a tiny Shih Tzu, the cynosure of all eyes here, but the film's rambling narrative meanders into all kinds of haphazard story lines that are simultaneously audacious, anarchic and random. If the name of writer-director Martin McDonagh is familiar, you sort of know what to expect. McDonagh, a celebrated Irish playwright ("The Lieutenant of Inishmore," "The Beauty Queen of Leenane")
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Scruffy and sloppy, and not without a filthy charm, "Choke" is writer-director Clark Gregg's adaptation of Chuck Palahniuk's 2001 novel of sex addiction and mother issues, and it plays out not unlike its central character's life: fumbling toward sentimental closure but ironically surer-footed on matters of debauchery and comic meanness. Lizardy indie stalwart Sam Rockwell takes his gift for sardonic aloofness to new heights as Victor, an adolescent-minded hedonist with a serious case of the pretends.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2008 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
Clark GREGG, one of those actors everyone recognizes as the strait-laced good guy -- see also: "The West Wing," "The New Adventures of Old Christine" -- was looking for his first film project to direct. Then “Choke,” the fourth novel by "Fight Club" scribe Chuck Palahniuk (rhymes with "politic") came his way: a heartwarming tale of a sex addict whose mother is lost in dementia and who, as Gregg puts it, "deliberately chokes on food so that he can form parasitic relationships with the wealthy people who Heimlich him."
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