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Sam Sebastiani

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NEWS
January 16, 1997 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sam Sebastiani Jr., a member of the fourth generation of the pioneering California wine family, died Tuesday night of mushroom poisoning, one of nine cases of mushroom poisoning reported in the Bay Area this winter. Sebastiani, 32, apparently consumed an Amanita phalloides, or "death cap," mushroom while picnicking with friends near Santa Rosa on Jan. 5. No one else in the group was affected.
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NEWS
January 16, 1997 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sam Sebastiani Jr., a member of the fourth generation of the pioneering California wine family, died Tuesday night of mushroom poisoning, one of nine cases of mushroom poisoning reported in the Bay Area this winter. Sebastiani, 32, apparently consumed an Amanita phalloides, or "death cap," mushroom while picnicking with friends near Santa Rosa on Jan. 5. No one else in the group was affected.
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BUSINESS
March 13, 1986 | BRUCE KEPPEL
The Sebastiani family feud took a new twist Wednesday with the naming of a Missouri distillery executive, A. Martin Adams, as president of the 82-year-old Sebastiani Vineyards in Sonoma. Adams, 42, president and chief operating officer since 1981 of McCormick Distilling Co., Weston, Mo., succeeds Sam Sebastiani, who was ousted Jan. 2 by his younger brother, Assemblyman Don Sebastiani, his mother, Sylvia Sebastiani, and his sister, Mary Ann Cuneo.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1986 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Sam Sebastiani has been ousted as president of family-owned Sebastiani Winery in Sonoma--California's eighth largest--in a shake-up ordered by the clan's matriarch, Sylvia, who named her younger son, Assemblyman Don Sebastiani (R-Sonoma), as chairman and chief executive. Sylvia Sebastiani stepped aside as chairman, a post she has held since inheriting 90% of the company's stock in 1980 on the death of her husband, August.
NEWS
January 9, 1997 | From Associated Press
A proliferation of poisonous wild mushrooms has sickened at least nine people in Northern California, with three victims in intensive care Wednesday facing possible liver transplants. The most seriously ill were felled by the death cap mushroom, known as Amanita phalloides, which can destroy the liver. One hospitalized victim is Sam Sebastiani Jr., 31, a member of the Sebastiani wine family.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | From Associated Press
Two of three people who ate poisonous mushrooms last weekend in San Francisco were upgraded to good condition Thursday, but a third remained critical with a severely damaged liver, hospital officials said. A 53-year-old man was not showing any improvement, and doctors did not know if he would need a liver transplant, University of California at San Francisco spokeswoman Alice Trinkl said. He remained on a liver transplant waiting list, just in case.
FOOD
February 27, 1992 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
This is the story of three men who started big and ended small. All three are better off because of it. The most dramatic story is Sam Sebastiani's. The eldest son of August Sebastiani (famous for his bib overalls) and the grandson of Samuele, who founded Sebastiani Vineyards in 1904, Sam assumed control of the winery after his father's death in 1980.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1987 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Sam Sebastiani turned as he unlocked a shed down the hill from his Eagle Ridge Ranch home above town. The shed houses a tiny winery in which he intends to craft special wines in batches of 400 cases. "I call it Villa Vittoria --victory!" he said, pushing open the door. For now, Villa Vittoria is Sebastiani's only wine-making facility. But the new Sam J.
FOOD
January 16, 1997 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The area that produces almost one-third of Louisiana's oysters was closed last week and all the oysters harvested from there after Dec. 22 were recalled when more than 150 people in 11 states became ill from eating shellfish contaminated with an as-yet-unidentified virus. No illnesses were reported in Southern California.
MAGAZINE
August 7, 1988 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
A LITTLE MORE than a year ago, I visited Sebastiani Vineyards in Sonoma to taste a series of varietals for projected release in the spring and fall of 1988. First up was the 1983 Richard Cuneo Cuvee de Chardonnay Champagne, followed by four vineyard-designated Chardonnays and two vineyard-designated Cabernets.
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