Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSam Shepard
IN THE NEWS

Sam Shepard

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sam Shepard's cultural reach goes deep. There's the Oscar nomination for supporting actor in "The Right Stuff," the Pulitzer Prize for his play "Buried Child" and his screenplay for the seminal film "Paris, Texas. " Shepard makes a brief appearance in Patti Smith's recent memoir, "Just Kids," in which she describes him as "my cowboy with Indian ways. " And with his soulful, loner swagger, he represents the poetic masculine American ideal. The new film "Blackthorn," which is already available on video on demand and which opened in Los Angeles on Friday, presupposes that the Wild West bandit Butch Cassidy did not die in a sepia-toned shootout as famously depicted in 1969's "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. " Rather, Shepard, in an increasingly rare lead role, portrays the outlaw as an old man living in the hardscrabble mountains of Bolivia, feeling time passing him by and dreaming of returning to America.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Playwright and actor Sam Shepard has a theory about looking to the rural life of yesteryear for entertainment: Nothing has changed. The 70-year-old actor stars in the forthcoming Discovery Channel miniseries "Klondike," which tells the story of the last great Gold Rush that swept Alaska and Canada's Yukon territory in the 19th century. While promoting the project Thursday at the Television Critics Assn. press tour in Pasadena, the actor mused on backwoods curiosity, particularly referring to "Klondike.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1997 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, Sam Shepard rewrote enough of his 1979 opus "Buried Child" for it to be deemed a new play when it went to Broadway in 1996 and entered the Tony competition. Now Flora Plumb has staged the new version at Theatre 40, in a production that lacks the compelling sense of mystery of previous productions. Some of this was intentional on Shepard's part. In an interview in American Theatre magazine, he said he wanted to get rid of "the gratuitously mysterious."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a distinctive intimacy to a handwritten letter between friends. You can feel the emotion behind the stroke of the pen, layers of meaning in the choice of a word. Put the letter writers in a room together and there is both comfort and disquiet, as if the other knows, perhaps, too much. "Shepard & Dark," a candid new documentary, captures that dichotomy as it riffles through the long correspondence and relationship between playwright-actor Sam Shepard and his close friend, Johnny Dark, a man of odd-jobs, intelligence and the kind of curated obscurity of someone fascinated by, but not envious of, the fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1987 | CATHY DE MAYO
January is shaping up as Sam Shepard Month in Orange County theater, but don't look for any official proclamations honoring the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright. Credit coincidence more than design with the fact that three Shepard plays are opening locally in a one-week period: "True West," which opened Friday at the Gem Theatre in Garden Grove; "The Curse of the Starving Class" at UC Irvine, which opens Thursday, and "Fool for Love," which opens Friday at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1992 | WOLF SCHNEIDER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Red dust whips over the desolate landscape on the plains of southeastern New Mexico. Rattlesnakes take shelter from a relentless sun under thorny mesquite bushes, and tarantulas roam at will. Not much has changed here since 1893, the year in which Sam Shepard's "Silent Tongue" is set. Except now the land belongs to ranchers instead of Kiowas and Comanches, and it's parceled out in sprawling sections, 640 acres each, marked off with grated cattle guards and swinging gates.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Almost from the moment we sat down, we started to worry about the Laguna Playhouse production of Sam Shepard's "True West." Jacquie Moffett's suburban kitchen set looks awfully big for an older home in Duarte--roughly the area of the play (and where Shepard spent a lot of time growing up). And the opening line--this corner's pick for funniest of any post-'60s play ("So Mom took off for Alaska, huh?")--was pretty much lost. Bad signs.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What a difference a decade has made for Sam Shepard, now firmly established as a playwright and movie star in the mainstream culture he once railed against. But before he and Jessica Lange mutated into the Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello of the cappuccino set, Shepard made his mark as a pioneer in experimental theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
"Don't Come Knocking" opens with a bandit mask view of blue sky and fluffy white clouds where the eyes should be. A reverse shot reveals it to be a panoramic vista of rocks near Moab, Utah, with Sam Shepard on horseback high-tailing it from somewhere or another. We quickly learn he's a washed-up movie star named Howard Spence who has gone AWOL from the set of a western in which he is starring. A 60-year-old drug- and alcohol-abusing playboy, Howard heads for home in Elko, Nev.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sam Shepard may be the ultimate example of that group of '60s and '70s playwrights who saw life through a glass cracked and smeared with offal. Their art was rhyparography, defined in Webster's Unabridged as the "painted or literary depiction of mean or sordid subjects." When Shepard is at his most honest, his plays are at their finest. Later in his career as a writer, his overindulgence, while still noticeable, got less in the way of the truth of his statements.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sam Shepard's cultural reach goes deep. There's the Oscar nomination for supporting actor in "The Right Stuff," the Pulitzer Prize for his play "Buried Child" and his screenplay for the seminal film "Paris, Texas. " Shepard makes a brief appearance in Patti Smith's recent memoir, "Just Kids," in which she describes him as "my cowboy with Indian ways. " And with his soulful, loner swagger, he represents the poetic masculine American ideal. The new film "Blackthorn," which is already available on video on demand and which opened in Los Angeles on Friday, presupposes that the Wild West bandit Butch Cassidy did not die in a sepia-toned shootout as famously depicted in 1969's "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. " Rather, Shepard, in an increasingly rare lead role, portrays the outlaw as an old man living in the hardscrabble mountains of Bolivia, feeling time passing him by and dreaming of returning to America.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Day Out of Days Stories Sam Shepard Alfred A. Knopf: 282 pp., $25.95 You can construct a body out of the stories, poems and inside-the-head dialogues in Sam Shepard's "Day Out of Days" -- as in that game, Exquisite Corpse. You fold up the paper and each person draws a different part. When you unfold the paper, you've got a funky body. This is the reason people always use words like "brutal," "haunting" and "lean" to describe Shepard's work: Each part is howling out some unfinished business.
NEWS
October 24, 2008
'Patti Smith' film: A review of "Patti Smith: Dream of Life" in the Oct. 17 Calendar section misspelled the last name of actor-playwright Sam Shepard as Shepherd.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2006
SAM SHEPARD: playwright or politician? ["Truth, Justice vs. America's Way," June 25] There's a saying in the theater, "If I want to know about politics, I'll read a newspaper." I have worked in Theater Genesis in Manhattan, a theater group that Shepard initiated with playwright colleagues. His work was remarkable for its Americana take on the people he portrayed in his plays. Has he now, as a middle-aged artist, become totally political instead of insightful? I hope that Shepard will stay with dark comedy instead of "The Message!"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
The oft-quoted notion that patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel doesn't quite do justice to the flag-brandishing demon in Sam Shepard's "The God of Hell." Indeed the play, which opened Wednesday in a disappointingly off-key production at the Geffen Playhouse, goes so far as to suggest that trumpeted national loyalty may be next to ungodliness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2006 | Patrick Pacheco, Special to The Times
WHEN the usually taciturn Sam Shepard, who made his reputation as an outlaw of sorts, decides to lay down the law, one tends to pay attention. "Well, right out of the gate let me get something straight," says the 62-year-old playwright, one hand brushing his gray-flecked, still-ample mane of hair, his blue eyes taking on a steely glint. "I'm not a politician, I hate politicians. I'm a playwright. I don't side with either Republicans or Democrats or anything in between.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every once in a while even a wild and crazy playwright like Sam Shepard feels an urge to nod in the direction of commercial theater. Shepard's nod was "True West." His most accessible work, and his most popular with the general public, it also is that anathema to many current playwrights: a well-made play. It has a beginning, a middle and an end, and its characters for the most part act like real human beings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Self-appointed pundits have lectured us as a nation about the evils of the '60s. That culturally explosive decade has been demonized--often by people who never understood it in the first place--so completely that the very mention of the phrase the '60s is uttered with a smirk and a rolling of the eyes. But the '60s was also an era of liberated expression that redefined every art form.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
"Don't Come Knocking" opens with a bandit mask view of blue sky and fluffy white clouds where the eyes should be. A reverse shot reveals it to be a panoramic vista of rocks near Moab, Utah, with Sam Shepard on horseback high-tailing it from somewhere or another. We quickly learn he's a washed-up movie star named Howard Spence who has gone AWOL from the set of a western in which he is starring. A 60-year-old drug- and alcohol-abusing playboy, Howard heads for home in Elko, Nev.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
In "This So-Called Disaster," Michael Almereyda's peek behind the theatrical curtain, actors thunder and rage, pushing themselves in the name of art and demons we can barely imagine. In one corner of a shadowy stage, Nick Nolte thunders like Zeus on a bender; in another, Sean Penn glowers with squinting mean eyes while Woody Harrelson nervously goes through his paces.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|