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SPORTS
January 13, 2001
Marty Glickman's bitter claim that he and Sam Stoller were taken off the 1936 gold-medal sprint relay team because of their heritage is ridiculous. Jesse Owens, Ralph Metcalfe and Frank Wykoff finished 1-2-3 in the 100 at the U.S. Olympic trials and Foy Draper was fourth. Selecting the four fastest 100 runners to make up the 400 relay team makes sense. Their exclusion wasn't based on racism, just the ego-free reality that comes from a stopwatch. Glickman and Stoller were simply slower runners.
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SPORTS
January 13, 2001
Marty Glickman's bitter claim that he and Sam Stoller were taken off the 1936 gold-medal sprint relay team because of their heritage is ridiculous. Jesse Owens, Ralph Metcalfe and Frank Wykoff finished 1-2-3 in the 100 at the U.S. Olympic trials and Foy Draper was fourth. Selecting the four fastest 100 runners to make up the 400 relay team makes sense. Their exclusion wasn't based on racism, just the ego-free reality that comes from a stopwatch. Glickman and Stoller were simply slower runners.
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SPORTS
January 5, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marty Glickman died Wednesday, and so what has long been one of the ugliest chapters in U.S. Olympic history--when he and Sam Stoller, both of them Jewish, were denied sure gold medals in Berlin in 1936--comes finally to a close.
SPORTS
January 5, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marty Glickman died Wednesday, and so what has long been one of the ugliest chapters in U.S. Olympic history--when he and Sam Stoller, both of them Jewish, were denied sure gold medals in Berlin in 1936--comes finally to a close.
SPORTS
March 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
More than six decades ago, U.S. Olympic officials told Marty Glickman and Sam Stoller that their dreams were over, that they wouldn't run in the Berlin Games. More speed was needed, their coaches said, but history points to something darker. A world war and a world of change later, the current U.S. Olympic leader is coming to town to praise the former sprinters and try to atone for an act that has become linked through the years to the anti-Semitism and Aryan theories of Nazi Germany.
SPORTS
July 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
Sixty-five years ago, Jesse Owens shattered the notion of Aryan superiority and humiliated Adolf Hitler by winning four track and field gold medals at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin. That accomplishment--and many other achievements in Owens' life--will be celebrated Tuesday night, when ESPN Classic shows a one-hour (5-6 p.m. PDT) "SportsCentury" special on the man considered by many to be the greatest track and field athlete in history.
NEWS
July 23, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty years ago, during Adolf Hitler's showcase Olympics in Berlin, the coaches assembled the U.S. track team and announced that two athletes would be dropped from the 400-meter relay team that day. A preposterous reason was offered. The American team was the heavy favorite, but the coaches said it had to be strengthened even more because there were rumors that the Germans had some powerful sprinters in hiding.
SPORTS
July 13, 1996 | STEVE JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
It is supposed to be the world's showcase for itself, a display of the highest ideals of peaceful competition. Nations paused in the evil of making war in order to hold Olympic Games, in which nobody died. But, of course, that was a long time ago when the custom was determined by the ancient Greeks. It's still the showcase for one thing or another, although not quite as intended when the Games were reborn in Athens 100 years ago.
SPORTS
December 7, 1996 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly 50 years, Mack Robinson, an Olympic Games silver medalist, has worked to get his hometown of Pasadena to properly recognize the accomplishments--athletic and sociological--of his younger brother, Jackie. Now, with the goal in sight, Mack may not be around to enjoy it. A statue of the Robinson brothers in Pasadena's civic center, across the street from the City Hall, is scheduled for an unveiling next summer. And Jackie will be recognized with a float in Rose Parade on New Year's Day.
SPORTS
August 15, 1999 | HAL BOCK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Editors note: This is one in a series of stories on great sports moments in each month during the century. * In August 1936, Nazi Germany welcomed the Olympic Games with an enthusiasm that shrouded the evil of Hitler's Third Reich. The regime's racism and anti-Semitism were hidden behind the facade of anticipation for a great athletic event. Crowds jammed the Berlin rail station as the American team arrived from Hamburg. Most of the excitement was generated by a young athlete from Ohio State.
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