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NEWS
May 3, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun had set two hours earlier. Deep in the woods, miles from the nearest pavement, a stream echoed with the raucous sounds of two common species of tree frogs. Suddenly a melodious trill was added to the cacophony, like someone whistling and rolling Rs at the same time. It was a sound few have ever heard--the unique mating call of the male arroyo toad. U.S. Forest Service wildlife biologist Nancy Sandburg, 35, shined her flashlight in the direction of the new notes.
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OPINION
September 9, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Federal efforts to protect growers of sugar beets and sugar cane epitomize everything that's wrong with U.S. farm programs. At times they've artificially raised the price of sugar, costing consumers billions of dollars; at other times they've stuck taxpayers with the bill for the surplus sugar production they've promoted. The fact that the sugar program is likely to survive the latest rewrite of the farm bill unscathed is a testament to how limited the bill's "reforms" are. Sweeteners are ubiquitous in processed foods, and sugar is the most popular by far. There are two primary sources in the United States: sugar beets, which are grown in parts of California (mainly in Imperial County)
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OPINION
September 9, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Federal efforts to protect growers of sugar beets and sugar cane epitomize everything that's wrong with U.S. farm programs. At times they've artificially raised the price of sugar, costing consumers billions of dollars; at other times they've stuck taxpayers with the bill for the surplus sugar production they've promoted. The fact that the sugar program is likely to survive the latest rewrite of the farm bill unscathed is a testament to how limited the bill's "reforms" are. Sweeteners are ubiquitous in processed foods, and sugar is the most popular by far. There are two primary sources in the United States: sugar beets, which are grown in parts of California (mainly in Imperial County)
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun had set two hours earlier. Deep in the woods, miles from the nearest pavement, a stream echoed with the raucous sounds of two common species of tree frogs. Suddenly a melodious trill was added to the cacophony, like someone whistling and rolling Rs at the same time. It was a sound few have ever heard--the unique mating call of the male arroyo toad. U.S. Forest Service wildlife biologist Nancy Sandburg, 35, shined her flashlight in the direction of the new notes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1992 | MACK REED
U. S. Forest Service officials are considering rerouting a recreational trail for motorcycles to avoid the spot where the rubber meets the toad--the rare arroyo toad, that is. Off-road motorcyclists on the Snowy Trail in the Los Padres National Forest once plunged through the Piru Creek breeding grounds of the arroyo toad, a tiny amphibian that is a candidate for the federal endangered species list.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Forest Service announced Monday that it intends to reopen a motorcycle trail through a remote stream bed, despite biologists' warnings that the cycles could wipe out the local population of the fragile arroyo toad. The world's largest population of the tiny toad, which is a candidate for the federal endangered species list, is found where the popular Snowy Trail crosses Piru Creek in Los Padres National Forest in northeastern Ventura County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER
The U.S. Forest Service will delay the reopening of a motorcycle trail through a rare toad habitat until officials review contradictory scientific opinions about the toads' safety, officials said Monday. Deputy Forest Supervisor Mark J. Madrid put the project on hold after three appeals were filed before the Jan. 26 deadline, all claiming that the agency's plan to protect the arroyo toad habitat did not go far enough, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Comedy is often based on anxiety and discomfort, but going one step beyond and trying to create laughter out of terror and psychosis is, "The Cable Guy" shows, a complete miscalculation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO
A portion of the massive Newhall Ranch housing project just east of Ventura County lies in a proposed critical habitat for the endangered arroyo toad, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said Wednesday. The housing project is being watched closely by Ventura County officials and environmentalists who believe it could affect water supplies, traffic and the Santa Clara River, which is the region's last free-flowing river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Forest Service announced Monday that it intends to reopen a motorcycle trail through a Ventura County stream bed, despite biologists' warnings that it could wipe out the local population of the arroyo toad. One of the few remaining populations of the tiny toad, which is a candidate for the federal endangered species list, lives and breeds at the point where the popular Snowy Trail crosses Piru Creek in the Los Padres National Forest in northeast Ventura County.
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