Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSam Tanenhaus
IN THE NEWS

Sam Tanenhaus

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
August 31, 2009 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
Think back to the spring of 1968. The U.S. is mired in Vietnam. The country is in turmoil. The sitting Democratic president abruptly pulls out of his campaign for reelection, and the leading conservative columnist of the day neither gloats nor does a victory dance. It's nearly impossible to imagine this happening today. We could chalk this up to the deterioration of civic discourse and the rise in political polarization (or is it the other way around?). But it's really part of a much more significant shift that has fractured the right side of the political spectrum.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 31, 2009 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
Think back to the spring of 1968. The U.S. is mired in Vietnam. The country is in turmoil. The sitting Democratic president abruptly pulls out of his campaign for reelection, and the leading conservative columnist of the day neither gloats nor does a victory dance. It's nearly impossible to imagine this happening today. We could chalk this up to the deterioration of civic discourse and the rise in political polarization (or is it the other way around?). But it's really part of a much more significant shift that has fractured the right side of the political spectrum.
Advertisement
BOOKS
December 14, 2003
To the Editor: In his review of my book "Reds: McCarthyism in Twentieth-Century America" [Nov. 23], Sam Tanenhaus objects to the epilogue as having "little to do with McCarthyism, which originated not in an excess of federal power but oppositely, in an attack on the federal bureaucracy and its policymakers." McCarthyism, however, is inseparable from political power, whether federal, congressional or judicial. Had McCarthy not been a senator, with access to the press and immunity from libel on the Senate floor in order to fire his defective ammunition, he would not have been able to win a national audience and lead his troops into battle.
BOOKS
December 14, 2003
To the Editor: In his review of my book "Reds: McCarthyism in Twentieth-Century America" [Nov. 23], Sam Tanenhaus objects to the epilogue as having "little to do with McCarthyism, which originated not in an excess of federal power but oppositely, in an attack on the federal bureaucracy and its policymakers." McCarthyism, however, is inseparable from political power, whether federal, congressional or judicial. Had McCarthy not been a senator, with access to the press and immunity from libel on the Senate floor in order to fire his defective ammunition, he would not have been able to win a national audience and lead his troops into battle.
BOOKS
March 2, 1997 | STANLEY I. KUTLER, Stanley I. Kutler is the author of "The Wars of Watergate" (W. W. Norton) and "The American Inquisition: Justice & Injustice in the Cold War" (Hill & Wang)
As the Reagan administration wound down, it made a big-time symbolic gesture to its loyal conservative constituency. The true believers had watched the so-called Reagan Revolution with some dismay. Reagan had not dismantled the New Deal, had friendly dealings with "Red China," had negotiated significant arms reduction treaties with the "Evil Empire" and had sent the national debt and budget deficits soaring to unbelievable heights.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | STAFF REPORTS
The Los Angeles Times announced the winners of its 1997 Book Prize awards today. The winners of the first seven categories are: * Fiction: "In the Rogue Blood," by James Carlos Blake (Avon). * Poetry: "Black Zodiac," by Charles Wright (Farrar, Straus & Giroux). * History: "A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution," by Orlando Figes (Viking Penguin). * Biography: "Whittaker Chambers: A Biography," by Sam Tanenhaus (Random House).
NEWS
March 11, 2004 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Ending months of anticipation, the New York Times on Wednesday announced that Sam Tanenhaus, a Vanity Fair contributing editor, has been named editor of the Book Review. Tanenhaus, 48, will replace Charles McGrath, who will continue to write for the newspaper. Before joining Vanity Fair in 1999, Tanenhaus was an assistant editor for the Times' Op-Ed pages.
BOOKS
March 1, 1998
FIRST FICTION WINNER: "Don't Erase Me: Stories" by Carolyn Ferrell (Houghton Mifflin) FINALISTS: "A Crime in the Neighborhood: A Novel" by Suzanne Berne (Algonquin) "Round Rock: A Novel" by Michelle Huneven (Alfred A. Knopf) "A Child Out of Alcatraz" by Tara Ison (Faber and Faber) "The God of Small Things" by Arundhati Roy (Random House) FICTION WINNER: "In the Rogue Blood" by James Carlos Blake (Avon Books) FINALISTS: "Reading In the Dark" by Seamus Deane (Alfred A. Knopf)
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
The case of Alger Hiss, accused of being a communist spy in the State Department, had plenty of intrigue to rivet the nation in the late 1940s: Soviet espionage, the communist underground in America. Secret papers hidden in a hollowed-out pumpkin. It still arouses interest today. The government's release of 4,200 pages of grand jury testimony from the Hiss case Tuesday packed a news conference with reporters and historians and reignited debate about the controversial case.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2010
TODAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer Haiti: Anderson Cooper. President Obama's first year: Joe Klein, Time magazine. Campaign finance reform: Jeff Toobin. 3 p.m. CNN Larry King Live 6 and 9 p.m. CNN McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY CBS News Sunday Morning The destructive nature of sex addiction; Melody Gardot. (N) 6 a.m. KCBS Today House calls; travel destinations; food court lunch makeover.
BOOKS
March 2, 1997 | STANLEY I. KUTLER, Stanley I. Kutler is the author of "The Wars of Watergate" (W. W. Norton) and "The American Inquisition: Justice & Injustice in the Cold War" (Hill & Wang)
As the Reagan administration wound down, it made a big-time symbolic gesture to its loyal conservative constituency. The true believers had watched the so-called Reagan Revolution with some dismay. Reagan had not dismantled the New Deal, had friendly dealings with "Red China," had negotiated significant arms reduction treaties with the "Evil Empire" and had sent the national debt and budget deficits soaring to unbelievable heights.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
In the book world's version of David vs. Goliath, first-time novelist Charles Frazier won the National Book Award for fiction on Tuesday, beating out the heavy favorite, Don DeLillo. Frazier, cited for his Civil War novel, "Cold Mountain," said even he had DeLillo on his mind as the award was being announced.
OPINION
July 10, 2003 | James P. Pinkerton
Ann Coulter is like T-X, the female Terminator in Arnold Schwarzenegger's new movie. The author of "Treason: Liberal Treachery From the Cold War to the War on Terrorism" is so obsessed with her search-and- destroy mission that she is blind to everything -- nuance, context, even, at times, the facts. The result is that the truth -- that traitors have existed in our midst -- is obscured by the collateral damage she inflicts.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|