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Samantha Larson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2002 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ain't no mountain high enough for Samantha Larson. At 12, she climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. On March 1, at 13, she reached the top of Argentina's Mt. Aconcagua, the highest peak in South America. Both ascents were international father-daughter adventures for the Long Beach eighth-grader, who needed special government permits for both climbs because of her youth. One thing for which she must hold a world record: doing algebra homework at 16,000 feet.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2002 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ain't no mountain high enough for Samantha Larson. At 12, she climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. On March 1, at 13, she reached the top of Argentina's Mt. Aconcagua, the highest peak in South America. Both ascents were international father-daughter adventures for the Long Beach eighth-grader, who needed special government permits for both climbs because of her youth. One thing for which she must hold a world record: doing algebra homework at 16,000 feet.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2007 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
Samantha Larson of Long Beach, who at 18 became one of the youngest people to summit Mt. Everest, safely arrived Saturday with her father at a base camp on the Nepal mountain, her relieved mother reported. "The most dangerous part of climbing is the descent," said Larson's mother, Sarah Hanson of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2007 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
"I feel really incredible," Samantha Larson, 18, said Sunday night, describing her sense of accomplishment after having conquered Mt. Everest -- the tallest place on Earth. It was about 9:30 a.m. Monday, Nepal time, and the Long Beach teenager was waiting below a base camp on the side of Mt. Everest for a helicopter to take her trekking group, including her father, to Katmandu.
SPORTS
June 29, 2007 | Pete Thomas
The dolphin didn't stand a chance once it had been separated from its pod. The killer whales overwhelmed the smaller mammal. They hurled their massive bodies out of the water and splashed down on top of it, grabbing it with their teeth and tossing it through the air. "They were playing with it just like a cat plays with a mouse," Tyler Elzig, captain of the fishing boat Sea Horse, said of what he witnessed Sunday. "It was the most intense thing I've seen in my entire life on the water."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2007 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
From Earth's tallest point, the message was understandably breathless. "We made it to the top!" Samantha Larson told her mother via satellite phone Thursday after reaching the summit of Mt. Everest. "Now all we have to do is make it back down." Larson, 18, of Long Beach, became one of the youngest people to scale the 29,035-foot peak, reaching the summit with a group that included her father, David Larson, 51, an anesthesiologist at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center.
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