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Samir A Vincent

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January 19, 2005 | Maggie Farley and T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writers
To begin to understand the complex history of Samir A. Vincent, consider what his hands have borne: a baptism certificate in Baghdad, a baton in the Olympics, a secret peace plan to Washington, cash bribes, and now, a criminal conviction. Vincent, who pleaded guilty Tuesday to illegally receiving millions of dollars from Saddam Hussein's regime in exchange for lobbying U.N. and U.S.
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WORLD
January 19, 2005 | Maggie Farley and T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writers
To begin to understand the complex history of Samir A. Vincent, consider what his hands have borne: a baptism certificate in Baghdad, a baton in the Olympics, a secret peace plan to Washington, cash bribes, and now, a criminal conviction. Vincent, who pleaded guilty Tuesday to illegally receiving millions of dollars from Saddam Hussein's regime in exchange for lobbying U.N. and U.S.
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WORLD
April 15, 2005 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. oil trader, a South Korean once accused of bribing U.S. congressmen and two other businessmen were charged Thursday with crimes in which they allegedly made millions of dollars in illegal profits by cutting secret deals with Saddam Hussein through the United Nations oil-for-food program. David B. Chalmers Jr.
WORLD
January 19, 2005 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
An Iraqi American businessman pleaded guilty Tuesday to illegally receiving millions of dollars from Iraq to lobby U.S. and U.N. officials to lift sanctions against the country. Samir A. Vincent, 64, is the first person to be convicted in the Justice Department's investigation of the U.N.'s Iraq oil-for-food program. In federal court in New York, he said that Iraq paid him, his partners and at least one U.N.
WORLD
February 3, 2005 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
It was the summer of 1990, and Saddam Hussein's Republican Guard had just stormed into oil-rich Kuwait. The U.N. Security Council, hoping to induce Iraq to withdraw and disarm, responded by imposing sanctions. Nearly 15 years, two wars and a regime change later, those sanctions and the multibillion-dollar "oil-for-food" program that followed them still shadow the United Nations. Eight investigations are underway in Washington and New York into how Hussein subverted and the U.N.
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