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Samira Makhmalbaf

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NEWS
July 7, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samira Makhmalbaf got the idea for her first movie from a small item on the evening news. Twin girls, age 12, had been rescued from parents who had kept them housebound since they were born. Unschooled and unexposed to anyone but their blind mother and elderly, deeply religious father, they walked as if severely disabled and couldn't pronounce real words. They had never even been bathed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2002 | LISA NESSELSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Whoever said "there's no such thing as bad publicity" couldn't have foreseen some of the early reactions to "11'09"01," in which 11 high-profile international filmmakers were given carte blanche to respond to the events of Sept. 11. The title, which stems from the date of the attacks as it is written in much of the world--with the day before the month--also describes the project's lone constraint.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2002 | LISA NESSELSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Whoever said "there's no such thing as bad publicity" couldn't have foreseen some of the early reactions to "11'09"01," in which 11 high-profile international filmmakers were given carte blanche to respond to the events of Sept. 11. The title, which stems from the date of the attacks as it is written in much of the world--with the day before the month--also describes the project's lone constraint.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samira Makhmalbaf got the idea for her first movie from a small item on the evening news. Twin girls, age 12, had been rescued from parents who had kept them housebound since they were born. Unschooled and unexposed to anyone but their blind mother and elderly, deeply religious father, they walked as if severely disabled and couldn't pronounce real words. They had never even been bathed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2000 | Kevin Crust
THE NEXT STEP Kate Hudson appears ready to break out with roles in a couple of fall films from prestigious directors. In September, Hudson, who is the daughter of Goldie Hawn, co-stars in Cameron Crowe's autobiographical "Almost Famous" as a rock 'n' roll groupie. She follows that with the October release of Robert Altman's "Dr. T & the Women," in which she plays Richard Gere's soon-to-be-married Dallas Cowboys cheerleader daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samira Makhmalbaf's "The Apple" is astonishing on at least three counts. First, it is a beguiling and tender film about an off-putting true-life incident: An impoverished 65-year-old Tehran man was discovered to have never allowed his 11-year-old twin daughters out of the house. Second, that it is the debut film of a 17-year-old filmmaker, daughter of major Iranian director Mohsen Makhmalbaf, known for such films as "A Moment of Innocence," "Once Upon a Time, Cinema" and "Gabbeh."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Not long after 9/11, a French producer named Alain Brigand asked 11 very different directors from across the world to make short films about the catastrophe. Some of Brigand's choices were real head-scratchers: No matter how great Sean Penn can be as an actor, as a director he has too leaden a touch for a subject so heavily freighted.
NEWS
April 24, 2003 | Nancy Tartaglione, Special to The Times
Despite the absence of such festival favorites as the Coen brothers and Quentin Tarantino, American films will be about as well-represented this year as they ever are at the Cannes Film Festival. The festival's lineup for the official competition, announced Wednesday, include three U.S. entries: Clint Eastwood's "Mystic River," Vincent Gallo's "The Brown Bunny" and Gus Van Sant's "Elephant." In light of recent frosty relations between the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Cannes, France Don't let those photographs of Robert Mitchum frolicking in the surf or Madonna flashing her underwear fool you, the Festival de Cannes has never been an easy, open place. But this year, it's something else again.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Must See TV" took on international significance Sunday night as Gus Van Sant's made-for-HBO "Elephant" won two major prizes at the Festival de Cannes, including the Palme d'Or. "I thought I was finished," a flabbergasted Van Sant said as he returned to the podium just minutes after collecting the best director award. "It's amazing. For many years, I tried just to get films into Cannes." Too stunned to notice he was mixing languages, Van Sant ended with a heartfelt "Viva la France."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Dancer in the Dark," a film whose back story was at least as interesting as what appeared on screen, was the predictable winner of the Palme d'Or at the 53rd Festival International du Film awards program Sunday night. As Danish director Lars von Trier, who won the Grand Jury Prize here for "Breaking the Waves" in 1997, noted in his thank-you speech, this festival has always been good to him, inviting six of his films to participate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2003 | Editor -- R. Kinsey Lowe; Capsules -- Richard Cromelin and Kevin Crust
Sept. 12 Cabin Fever Horror Lions Gate With: Rider Strong, Jordan Ladd, Joey Kern, Cerina Vincent, James DeBello. The idea: Teenagers head to a cabin in the woods, encounter a voracious virus. Writers: Randy Pearlstein, Eli Roth; story by Roth. Director: Roth. * So? Throwback/homage to '80s cult horror flicks. Dummy Comedy Artisan With: Adrien Brody, Jessica Walter, Ron Liebman, Illeana Douglas, Jared Harris, Milla Jovovich. The idea: Uber-geek connects with person of wood.
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