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Sammie Haynes

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NEWS
April 3, 1992 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William (Sack) Morgan once threw fastballs that made batters fearful. But a few years ago, the former Negro League pitcher, suffering from diabetes, had to have his legs amputated and was paralyzed after a stroke. He later lost his ability to speak. The wheelchair-bound Morgan moved to a convalescent home in Atlanta. "He was almost totally helpless," says another former player. With such heavy medical needs, Morgan and his wife worried about bills.
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SPORTS
November 20, 1997 | MIKE TERRY
More than 200 mourners, including former Dodger manager Tom Lasorda and former major league players Lou Johnson and Jim "Mudcat" Grant, attended Wednesday's memorial service for former Negro League catcher and community activist Sammie Haynes. The memorial was held at the First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles. Haynes, 77, who died Nov.
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SPORTS
November 18, 1997 | PETE THOMAS
Memorial services for former Negro League baseball player and longtime community activist Sammie Haynes, who died at 77 last week in Los Angeles after a bout with cancer, will be held Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the First African Methodist Church in Los Angeles. Haynes will be remembered for his days as a catcher with the Kansas City Monarchs from 1942-45, and playing with the likes of such Negro League greats as Satchel Paige and Jackie Robinson.
SPORTS
November 18, 1997 | PETE THOMAS
Memorial services for former Negro League baseball player and longtime community activist Sammie Haynes, who died at 77 last week in Los Angeles after a bout with cancer, will be held Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the First African Methodist Church in Los Angeles. Haynes will be remembered for his days as a catcher with the Kansas City Monarchs from 1942-45, and playing with the likes of such Negro League greats as Satchel Paige and Jackie Robinson.
SPORTS
November 20, 1997 | MIKE TERRY
More than 200 mourners, including former Dodger manager Tom Lasorda and former major league players Lou Johnson and Jim "Mudcat" Grant, attended Wednesday's memorial service for former Negro League catcher and community activist Sammie Haynes. The memorial was held at the First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles. Haynes, 77, who died Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1993 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In his youth, Sammie Haynes was one of the best baseball players around, sharing the diamond with such legends as Jackie Robinson, Satchel Paige and Willie Mays. Still, Haynes never got a chance to prove himself in the major leagues during his heyday in the 1930s and early 1940s because of the color of his skin. Instead of playing for the New York Yankees or the Chicago Cubs, Haynes played for the Kansas City Monarchs, the premier team in the Negro American League.
SPORTS
August 19, 1994 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You'll have to forgive the dwindling numbers of Negro league veterans during this most recent of baseball strikes. They can't believe what they're seeing: Millionaire players walking out over something called a "salary cap." Sammie Haynes' salary was $200 a month. Well, not quite. His meal money was $2 a day, and that was deducted from his paycheck.
SPORTS
June 4, 2000 | DIANE PUCIN
Two sisters in Leimert Park put together a small, heartfelt exhibition. Three hundred kids play in a baseball tournament on the Conrad Hilton Field at Martin Luther King Jr. Park. And a summer holiday weekend becomes a warm tribute to a man named Sammie Haynes, a man who died three years ago, a man who was blind in his eyes but who saw with his heart and who always loved the kids, baseball and the old Negro Leagues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1993 | PATRICK J. MCDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight-year-old Michael Price had a question: Why did the black and white ballplayers have to be in separate leagues? "That was a tough one to answer," said Monty DeGraff, who accompanied the youngster Saturday on a trip through history. "How do you explain something like that to a kid?"
HEALTH
October 6, 1997 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a darkened hospital room, David Walker quietly sits at the bedside of Sammie Haynes. Haynes, who is 77, has been blind since he was 45. Recently, he underwent heart surgery, but now has pneumonia. His wife has left for a while, and until Walker arrived, the one-time catcher for the legendary Satchel Paige, was alone. The two men chat amicably at first. Walker asks Haynes how he is doing, and he replies the hospital food isn't as good as his wife's cooking.
SPORTS
August 19, 1994 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You'll have to forgive the dwindling numbers of Negro league veterans during this most recent of baseball strikes. They can't believe what they're seeing: Millionaire players walking out over something called a "salary cap." Sammie Haynes' salary was $200 a month. Well, not quite. His meal money was $2 a day, and that was deducted from his paycheck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1993 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In his youth, Sammie Haynes was one of the best baseball players around, sharing the diamond with such legends as Jackie Robinson, Satchel Paige and Willie Mays. Still, Haynes never got a chance to prove himself in the major leagues during his heyday in the 1930s and early 1940s because of the color of his skin. Instead of playing for the New York Yankees or the Chicago Cubs, Haynes played for the Kansas City Monarchs, the premier team in the Negro American League.
NEWS
April 3, 1992 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William (Sack) Morgan once threw fastballs that made batters fearful. But a few years ago, the former Negro League pitcher, suffering from diabetes, had to have his legs amputated and was paralyzed after a stroke. He later lost his ability to speak. The wheelchair-bound Morgan moved to a convalescent home in Atlanta. "He was almost totally helpless," says another former player. With such heavy medical needs, Morgan and his wife worried about bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1997 | JERRY HICKS
When you walk into the sparkling new Laura's House Children's Learning Center in San Clemente, it's not just how spectacular the place looks that impresses you most. It's how it was all put together by volunteer effort. Laura's House in San Clemente is both a temporary shelter and walk-in center for battered women in the south Orange County and northern San Diego County area. Its new learning center--adjacent to its walk-in center at 97 Calle de Industrias--held its grand opening Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tony Gwynn. Darryl Strawberry. Rickey Henderson. Today, we take black athletes for granted, much as we take integrated schools and public facilities for granted. But it's been only 45 years since Jackie Robinson became the first black to play major league baseball when he took the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Brooklyn-based playwright Ed Schmidt looks at Robinson and Branch Rickey, and the pact they made in "Mr. Rickey Calls a Meeting."
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