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Sammy Fain

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December 8, 1989
A public memorial service for veteran composer Sammy Fain will be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Hollywood Temple Beth El, 1317 N. Crescent Heights Blvd. in Los Angeles. Fain was 87 when he died Wednesday at UCLA Medical Center.
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NEWS
December 8, 1989
A public memorial service for veteran composer Sammy Fain will be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Hollywood Temple Beth El, 1317 N. Crescent Heights Blvd. in Los Angeles. Fain was 87 when he died Wednesday at UCLA Medical Center.
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NEWS
December 6, 1989 | From Times Staff and wire service reports
Composer Sammy Fain, a two-time Academy Award winner who wrote such songs as "Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing," "I'll Be Seeing You," and "That Old Feeling," died today. He was 87. Fain, who suffered a heart attack, was at UCLA Medical Center when he died, said Ken Sunshine, a publicist for the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sammy Fain, among the last of that select breed of tunesmiths who peddled their songs from the backs of trucks and in the dingy hallways of New York City's legendary Tin Pan Alley, died Wednesday. The two-time Academy Award-winning songwriter (for "Love Is a Many Splendored Thing" and "Secret Love") was 87 when he died of a heart attack at UCLA Medical Center.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sammy Fain, among the last of that select breed of tunesmiths who peddled their songs from the backs of trucks and in the dingy hallways of New York City's legendary Tin Pan Alley, died Wednesday. The two-time Academy Award-winning songwriter (for "Love Is a Many Splendored Thing" and "Secret Love") was 87 when he died of a heart attack at UCLA Medical Center.
NEWS
March 25, 1987
The second annual Singers' Salute to the Songwriter at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on April 6 will raise funds for the Betty Clooney Foundation for the Brain Injured, a nonprofit organization serving those with traumatic head injuries. The Singers' Award for Legendary Song Composition will be given to Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Fain, Henry Mancini, Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager and Stevie Wonder. The Arranger's Award will go to Billy May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1989
When Lucille Ball's heart gave out, Americans responded with a flood of heartfelt emotion normally reserved for only the most intimate of friends. In a sense, the pumpkin-haired co-creator and star of "I Love Lucy" was just that. Durning the Golden Age of TV, she turned up weekly in the living rooms of 40 million viewers. In reruns, she is bound to continue entertaining well into the 21st Century. Perhaps President Bush summed it up best. The whole world, he declared, loved Lucy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1991
On reading the original-film-score nominations, I was shocked at the potential for a miscarriage of justice represented by the "Havana" score, which is substantially music from other sources, and by the "Ghost" score. Alex North wrote the "Ghost" theme as a main title in 1955 for the film "Unchained." It was not until the 1960s that the lyrics were written for the Righteous Brothers' recording. I have heard arguments to the effect that earlier Oscar-winning scores have used themes written by other composers, most notably the score Alfred Newman wrote for "Love Is a Many Splendored Thing," based on a song by Sammy Fain.
NEWS
January 5, 1986
Herbert Magidson, whose lyrics to "The Continental" won the first Academy Award ever given to a song, has died in Beverly Hills, a spokesman for the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers announced Friday. He was 79 and broke into show business in 1928 when Sophie Tucker hired him to write special material for her. Magidson's lyrics from the Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers film, "The Gay Divorcee," received the first Best Song award in 1934, an honor he shared with composer Con Conrad.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Taking her cue from Peter Pan, Rickie Lee Jones gives her typically half-bohemian, half-childlike treatment to "I Won't Grow Up," one of a dozen selections on this thoroughly charming album of mostly acoustic, mostly standard songs. The obvious irony is that Jones is casting her de facto lot with a plethora of modern songstresses, from Ronstadt to Cole, who've earned their grown-up stripes by momentarily returning to a presumably classier pre-rock era.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | From Times Staff and wire service reports
Composer Sammy Fain, a two-time Academy Award winner who wrote such songs as "Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing," "I'll Be Seeing You," and "That Old Feeling," died today. He was 87. Fain, who suffered a heart attack, was at UCLA Medical Center when he died, said Ken Sunshine, a publicist for the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
Although technology has played a considerable role in reshaping jazz during the past decade or so, no number of synthesizers and gadgets can be blamed for what many find to be a general decline in musical quality. A case in point is John Abercrombie, the New York-based guitarist who worked the weekend at the Palace Court with bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Peter Erskine.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Yellen, whose songs and lyrics ranged from Franklin D. Roosevelt's first presidential campaign theme--the upbeat "Happy Days Are Here Again"--to Sophie Tucker's plaintive plea to her boyfriend, "Mr. Siegal, You Gotta Make It Legal," has died in his Upstate New York home. The son of a Polish pawnbroker who emigrated to the United States near the turn of the century was 98 when he died Wednesday in the Erie County community of Springville.
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