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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | Associated Press
A federal judge in Rhode Island says "Survivor" winner Richard Hatch cannot leave home confinement early to star in a 10th anniversary edition of the reality show in Samoa. Hatch was convicted in 2006 of failing to pay taxes on the $1 million he won on the debut season of the CBS reality show. He spent about three years in federal prison and is serving the final 90 days of his sentence at home in Newport. Hatch last week asked a federal judge for permission to leave for Samoa next month, when filming begins.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
"Next Goal Wins" is an irresistible underdog story - sports-fan credentials not required. The lively documentary follows the biggest loser in international soccer as it tries to break a 17-year winless streak. To use the word "organization" is putting too fine a point on it: The team in question resides in the South Pacific territory of American Samoa, and the volunteer players are about as far removed as you can get - geographically and every other way - from the business of high-profile, high-stakes athletics.
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SPORTS
August 11, 2005 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
When Shaka Sola missed his flight and arrived late at the world championships at Helsinki, Finland, he was saddened to learn that he had also missed the shotput competition. The Samoan was offered a chance at javelin instead and finished last with a throw that was entertaining to everyone but him. "You will not see me with a javelin again unless you come to Samoa and I catch you a fish," Sola told Reuters. His best toss of 41.
AUTOS
February 14, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger
In its latest bid to put the sudden acceleration matter behind it, Toyota Motor Corp. has reached a $29-million settlement with attorneys general from 29 states and one U.S. territory.   The agreement, announced Thursday, was originally approved by Toyota's board in Japan in December, the company said. It comes less than two months after Toyota announced a record-setting $1.1-billion settlement of hundreds of class-action claims that the automaker's actions involving the acceleration problem had damaged the value of consumers' vehicles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2003 | From the Washington Post
Wallace M. Greene Jr., a retired four-star general who was commandant of the Marine Corps during the buildup of U.S. forces for the war in Southeast Asia, died Saturday in Alexandria, Va. He was 95, and the cause of death was multiple myeloma. During a 37-year career, Greene gained a reputation as a brilliant staff officer, long-range planner and troubleshooter. He served as commandant from 1964 through 1967.
NEWS
November 21, 1996 | Associated Press
Eni Faleomavaega won reelection to a fifth term as American Samoa's nonvoting member of the U.S. House. Faleomavaega received 6,321 votes, or 56.7%, in Tuesday's runoff election, while Gus Hannemann, a former member of the American Samoa House of Representatives, got 4,871 votes, or 43.3%. The runoff was needed because neither candidate received more than 50% in the Nov. 5 general election.
MAGAZINE
March 18, 2001 | AMANDA JONES
Imagine this. It's pitch dark and you have just arrived on a remote South Pacific island. You haven't a clue what to expect because, truth is, Americans don't know much about the tiny, remote country of Samoa. So here's a quick sketch: Robert Louis Stevenson died here, Margaret Mead created a scandal here, the local television station began operating in 1993 and the first traffic light was installed in the capital in 1996.
TRAVEL
October 25, 2009
1 Samoa Islands A devastating tsunami on Sept. 30 that killed more than 150 people on the islands also hit the National Park of American Samoa, damaging its headquarters and visitor center and washing away some artifacts, officials said. The park, known for its tropical forests, archaeological treasures and coral reefs, was closed to visitors. -- associated press 2 Mexico Biologists and park workers at this country's monarch butterfly reserve raced to cut down up to 9,000 fir trees infected with the bark beetle before the butterflies arrive later this month for the winter.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Catherine Watson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
THE BEST WAY TO SAMOA From LAX, Air New Zealand offers connecting service (change of planes) to Apia, Samoa. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $868. TELEPHONES To call the numbers below from the U.S., dial 011 (international dialing code), 68 (the country code) and the local number. GETTING AROUND Independent Samoa's public bus system relies on old school buses. They'll get you anywhere for a couple of tala, but schedules are flexible. Catch them at the open-air depot by the harbor in Apia or flag them down on the roads.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Catherine Watson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even in darkness, on the way from the airport, Samoa didn't look like anywhere else I'd been in Polynesia — not like Rarotonga or Fiji, not like Tahiti or Easter Island. Open pavilions dotted the roadsides almost as frequently as the small houses. Some were more brightly lighted: Designed as ovals and sometimes squares, their thatched roofs supported by pillars, they glowed like cages in the hot tropical night. In some small ones, families were watching TV, as if the pavilions were open-air living rooms.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Lonely Planet's top 10 U.S. destinations for 2013 leans toward outdoorsy more than urban spots and gives a big thumbs up to the Eastern Sierra, the sole California location that made the list. "This year, hop past Yosemite - just beyond lies the secret California dream: the Eastern Sierra, the overlooked flank of the Sierra Nevada range, with other-worldly natural attractions and surprises (Basque culture?), not to mention far fewer visitors," Lonely Planet author Robert Reid writes.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
If you're visiting Samoa, be prepared to skip Friday and get an early start on New Year's Eve celebrations. The country that sits in the South Pacific near the International Date Line will change its time zone midnight Thursday to be in sync with Australia and New Zealand. The nation of two main islands, Upolu and Savai'i, and several smaller ones will move west of the imaginary date line time-wise. Before the change, Tonga and Fiji, its nearest neighbors, were a day ahead of Samoa.
TRAVEL
December 18, 2011 | By David Lamb, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Phileas Fogg went around the world in 80 days. I did it in 23. And I bet I visited more amazing sites than he - India's Taj Mahal, Easter Island, Tibet, Cambodia's Angkor Wat, the African plains, to name a few - all without having to endure the tramp steamers, bone-jarring trains and elephants that Fogg used in 1872. I traveled by private jet. The price of a seat, and all that went with it, was $64,950. The trip was sold by National Geographic Expeditions, which each year offers at least one and sometimes four around-the-world tours by private jet, a leased Boeing 757-200 that is configured with only 77 super-large and dreamily comfortable seats.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Catherine Watson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
THE BEST WAY TO SAMOA From LAX, Air New Zealand offers connecting service (change of planes) to Apia, Samoa. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $868. TELEPHONES To call the numbers below from the U.S., dial 011 (international dialing code), 68 (the country code) and the local number. GETTING AROUND Independent Samoa's public bus system relies on old school buses. They'll get you anywhere for a couple of tala, but schedules are flexible. Catch them at the open-air depot by the harbor in Apia or flag them down on the roads.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Catherine Watson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even in darkness, on the way from the airport, Samoa didn't look like anywhere else I'd been in Polynesia — not like Rarotonga or Fiji, not like Tahiti or Easter Island. Open pavilions dotted the roadsides almost as frequently as the small houses. Some were more brightly lighted: Designed as ovals and sometimes squares, their thatched roofs supported by pillars, they glowed like cages in the hot tropical night. In some small ones, families were watching TV, as if the pavilions were open-air living rooms.
TRAVEL
October 25, 2009
1 Samoa Islands A devastating tsunami on Sept. 30 that killed more than 150 people on the islands also hit the National Park of American Samoa, damaging its headquarters and visitor center and washing away some artifacts, officials said. The park, known for its tropical forests, archaeological treasures and coral reefs, was closed to visitors. -- associated press 2 Mexico Biologists and park workers at this country's monarch butterfly reserve raced to cut down up to 9,000 fir trees infected with the bark beetle before the butterflies arrive later this month for the winter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2003 | From Religion News Service
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has announced plans to rebuild its temple in Apia, Samoa, after it was destroyed in a July 9 fire. No one was injured in the blaze in the 14,000-square-foot structure, the first in the religious body's history to be destroyed by fire. Dedicated in 1983, the temple had been undergoing renovation and expansion. Church officials predict it will take about six months to design a new temple and about 18 to 24 months to construct it.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1985 | From Reuters
Two years ago, the tiny, isolated South Pacific nation of Western Samoa was almost bankrupt. Oil companies had threatened to turn off fuel supplies for which they were not being paid. The New Zealand government had formally warned its companies against extending credit. And inflation was running at 22%. Today, Western Samoa is being feted as the International Monetary Fund's model small island economy.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Scientists surveying American Samoa's coral reefs say the Sept. 29 tsunami obliterated some corals and damaged others to the point that they might not recover. Researchers say more assessments will be needed to get a full sense of how the disaster affected coral in the U.S. territory. But in at least one area, the damage was so severe and the affected area already in such bad shape before the tsunamis, that the coral may never return. A team led by Douglas Fenner, a coral reef monitoring ecologist with American Samoa's Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources, has surveyed about 20 sites around the territory.
WORLD
October 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Convoys of military vehicles brought food, water and medicine to the tsunami-stricken Samoa Islands on Thursday as victims wandered through what was left of their villages with tales of being trapped underwater, watching young children drown and hoisting elderly parents above the waves. The death toll rose to 160 as grim-faced islanders gathered under a traditional meetinghouse to hear a Samoan government minister discuss a plan for a mass funeral and burial next week. Samoans traditionally bury their loved ones near their homes, but that could be impractical because many villages have been wiped out. The dead from Tuesday's earthquake and tsunami include 120 in Samoa, 31 in American Samoa and nine in Tonga.
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