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WORLD
October 1, 2009 | David Pierson
The death toll in Samoa and American Samoa rose to 99 early today, according to news reports, after a powerful tsunami triggered by a deep ocean earthquake devastated coastal towns. Dozens of people were still missing. Seventeen hours after the magnitude 8.0 temblor struck, another massive ocean earthquake off the coast of Indonesia's Sumatra island early today killed at least 75 people and trapping thousands under rubble. A tsunami warning was issued in the region but was later lifted.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
As Hurricane Katrina floodwaters were about to fill the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, Ken McRoyal, his mother and two sisters grabbed what they could carry and fled. They made it to a hotel downtown, but when waters kept rising, they abandoned everything. They walked through fetid water, past dead bodies, to a truck that took them to Baton Rouge, La., where they called relatives in Carson. "They arrived with only the clothes that they were wearing," said Allyson Manumaleuna, McRoyal's cousin in Carson and a social worker who became like a second mother.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
As Hurricane Katrina floodwaters were about to fill the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, Ken McRoyal, his mother and two sisters grabbed what they could carry and fled. They made it to a hotel downtown, but when waters kept rising, they abandoned everything. They walked through fetid water, past dead bodies, to a truck that took them to Baton Rouge, La., where they called relatives in Carson. "They arrived with only the clothes that they were wearing," said Allyson Manumaleuna, McRoyal's cousin in Carson and a social worker who became like a second mother.
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | By Terry Gardner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you’ve wondered whether life would be simpler if you carried a spear instead of a cellphone, set sail for Go Native at the Polynesian Cultural Center on the Hawaiian island of Oahu . When guests begged to put foot to bark after watching locals demonstrate coconut tree climbing with bare hands and feet, the center's operators decided they should get a chance to do it. Besides tree-climbing Samoan style, seven other native activities...
TRAVEL
April 18, 2010 | Terry Gardner
I would rather eat paste than poi, and I hate buffet lines, so I thought I wasn't the luau type. Family-style service, upscale Hawaiian fare and five bare-chested male dancers twirling and throwing flaming knives changed my mind and kindled my curiosity about Samoan fire knife dancing. The Samoan warrior dance, or ailao, didn't include fire until 1946 when, rehearsing their acts in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park, a Hindu fire-eater and a baton twirler inspired Uluao "Freddie" Letuli to embellish his Samoan warrior dance.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Catherine Watson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even in darkness, on the way from the airport, Samoa didn't look like anywhere else I'd been in Polynesia — not like Rarotonga or Fiji, not like Tahiti or Easter Island. Open pavilions dotted the roadsides almost as frequently as the small houses. Some were more brightly lighted: Designed as ovals and sometimes squares, their thatched roofs supported by pillars, they glowed like cages in the hot tropical night. In some small ones, families were watching TV, as if the pavilions were open-air living rooms.
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | By Terry Gardner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you’ve wondered whether life would be simpler if you carried a spear instead of a cellphone, set sail for Go Native at the Polynesian Cultural Center on the Hawaiian island of Oahu . When guests begged to put foot to bark after watching locals demonstrate coconut tree climbing with bare hands and feet, the center's operators decided they should get a chance to do it. Besides tree-climbing Samoan style, seven other native activities...
WORLD
October 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Convoys of military vehicles brought food, water and medicine to the tsunami-stricken Samoa Islands on Thursday as victims wandered through what was left of their villages with tales of being trapped underwater, watching young children drown and hoisting elderly parents above the waves. The death toll rose to 160 as grim-faced islanders gathered under a traditional meetinghouse to hear a Samoan government minister discuss a plan for a mass funeral and burial next week. Samoans traditionally bury their loved ones near their homes, but that could be impractical because many villages have been wiped out. The dead from Tuesday's earthquake and tsunami include 120 in Samoa, 31 in American Samoa and nine in Tonga.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | ALAN DROOZ, Times Staff Writer
Niu Sale "makes things happen. He really loves to be out there. Even in practice he gives 100%. In practice we let him go live to give our ends a true look, and they can't get a hand on him." --Andy Szabatura Bishop Montgomery coach Size has always helped in football, but it isn't compulsory. A decade ago 5-foot-7 Archie Griffin won Heisman Trophy bookends at Ohio State.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1993
As gang violence increases from San Clemente to La Habra, gangs have become a growing concern throughout Orange County and a Priority for police and the district attorney's office. Gangs of all kinds operate within the county. Some are so-called "territorial" or "turf" gangs, whose members believe they control specific areas; others are considered "nomadic," operating in various places in he county with no special turf. Some are considered violent; some are not.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Valerie Gladstone, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A man emerges on the shadowy stage, bare-chested and tattooed, as powerful as a force of nature. As light glimmers across his body, he stares into space, the sound of gongs clanging in the distance. Suddenly, he comes alive, eyes widening in fear, and he lunges forward as if ready to go to battle. In one unearthly scene like this after another, Samoan choreographer Lemi Ponifasio transports audiences with "Tempest: Without a Body" to a place outside time where human beings morph into lizards and birds into rocks.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Catherine Watson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even in darkness, on the way from the airport, Samoa didn't look like anywhere else I'd been in Polynesia — not like Rarotonga or Fiji, not like Tahiti or Easter Island. Open pavilions dotted the roadsides almost as frequently as the small houses. Some were more brightly lighted: Designed as ovals and sometimes squares, their thatched roofs supported by pillars, they glowed like cages in the hot tropical night. In some small ones, families were watching TV, as if the pavilions were open-air living rooms.
TRAVEL
April 18, 2010 | Terry Gardner
I would rather eat paste than poi, and I hate buffet lines, so I thought I wasn't the luau type. Family-style service, upscale Hawaiian fare and five bare-chested male dancers twirling and throwing flaming knives changed my mind and kindled my curiosity about Samoan fire knife dancing. The Samoan warrior dance, or ailao, didn't include fire until 1946 when, rehearsing their acts in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park, a Hindu fire-eater and a baton twirler inspired Uluao "Freddie" Letuli to embellish his Samoan warrior dance.
WORLD
October 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Convoys of military vehicles brought food, water and medicine to the tsunami-stricken Samoa Islands on Thursday as victims wandered through what was left of their villages with tales of being trapped underwater, watching young children drown and hoisting elderly parents above the waves. The death toll rose to 160 as grim-faced islanders gathered under a traditional meetinghouse to hear a Samoan government minister discuss a plan for a mass funeral and burial next week. Samoans traditionally bury their loved ones near their homes, but that could be impractical because many villages have been wiped out. The dead from Tuesday's earthquake and tsunami include 120 in Samoa, 31 in American Samoa and nine in Tonga.
WORLD
October 1, 2009 | David Pierson
The death toll in Samoa and American Samoa rose to 99 early today, according to news reports, after a powerful tsunami triggered by a deep ocean earthquake devastated coastal towns. Dozens of people were still missing. Seventeen hours after the magnitude 8.0 temblor struck, another massive ocean earthquake off the coast of Indonesia's Sumatra island early today killed at least 75 people and trapping thousands under rubble. A tsunami warning was issued in the region but was later lifted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
Rocking an infant nephew in her arms, Mary Poloai stood outside the main entrance of the imposing Samoan Congregational Christian Church in Carson on Wednesday staring up at the sky and fighting back tears. "I'm so sad that I can't think straight," said Poloai, 58, one of more than 100 people who gathered at a special prayer service for victims of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Samoa and American Samoa early Tuesday. "They still haven't found my mother's sisters," she said.
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | Associated Press
Fofo I. F. Sunia, the non-voting delegate from American Samoa, resigned from Congress today, a month after his guilty plea in a payroll padding scheme. The resignation of Sunia, a four-term Democrat, came a day before the House ethics committee planned to hold a disciplinary hearing against him and a staff accomplice who resigned last week. Sunia's resignation ended the ethics panel's jurisdiction over him, inasmuch as it can only discipline current members and employees of the House.
NEWS
February 2, 1987
The government of American Samoa is seeking canned foods and cash to help victims of a hurricane that ravaged three islands Jan. 17. Hurricane Tusi, packing winds of 80 m.p.h., hit the islands of Ofu, Olosega and Tau, causing an estimated $100 million in damage and leaving about 2,000 people homeless. At least 30 Samoans, who are American nationals by birth, were injured, including 12 seriously enough to require hospitalization. Contributions may be sent to the Office of Samoan Affairs; 1007 E.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2009 | Times Wire Services
A powerful Pacific Ocean earthquake spawned towering tsunami waves that swept ashore on Samoa and American Samoa early Tuesday, flattening villages, killing dozens of people and leaving several workers missing at a devastated national park. Cars and people were swept out to sea as survivors fled to high ground, where they remained huddled hours later. Signs of devastation were everywhere, with a giant boat washed ashore at the edge of a highway and cars and homes swallowed by floodwaters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2009 | Louis Sahagun and Robert J. Lopez
A sense of urgency spread across Southern California's tight-knit Samoan community in the aftermath of a powerful earthquake and tsunami that killed at least 34 people and destroyed homes in American Samoa. A number of Samoans, many of whom live in the South Bay and Long Beach areas, rushed home to call relatives after hearing news of the devastation. Others gathered in somber meetings at area churches to begin organizing donation and relief efforts. "Tonight, we are all in prayer mode," said Ed Lalau, 40, a Carson resident and member of the United Samoan Congregational Church in Carson.
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