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Samoan

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no ordinary celebration--six Samoan congregations gathered at the same Carson church, the majestic harmony of their choirs rising above the sound of the heavy rain that pelted the ground outside. There was a two-hour service, conducted in their native language, and then the worshipers helped themselves to generous portions of traditional Samoan food.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991
A Compton police officer was ordered Friday to stand trial on voluntary manslaughter charges for the fatal shootings of two unarmed Samoan-American brothers during a domestic disturbance call last February. Officer Alfred Skiles does not dispute that he shot Pouvi Tualaulelei and his younger sibling, Itali, a total of 19 times, but claims that he fired in self-defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1991 | ANDREA FORD and JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The filing of manslaughter charges against a Compton policeman who shot two Samoan brothers a total of 19 times brought sharp criticism on Thursday from the officer's supporters and detractors, though for conflicting reasons. Samoan community leaders expressed outrage that Officer Alfred F. Skiles Jr. was charged with two counts of voluntary manslaughter--not murder--for killing Pouvi Tualaulelei, 34, and his brother, Itali, 22, outside their Compton home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1991 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's late in the afternoon at Winfield Scott Park in Carson. Street-wise youths are sitting on park tables. Tennis courts are full, and about a dozen kids are practicing flag football on a field shared with a soccer team. The biggest kids on the field are Samoan. Their size, like that of their elders, is considerable. To the Samoans, that stature is a source of pride. And it draws attention. Yet, paradoxically, Samoans are among the South Bay's most overlooked, misunderstood ethnic groups.
SPORTS
October 5, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no kitchen table. It was thrown out when the group of athletes grew to six, two too many for the table but not for the two-bedroom apartment. There is even room for a dog. The living room is bare except for two mattresses and the piles of sweats and T-shirts at the foot of each mattress. In each bedroom are two tiny beds, too small for the hefty Cal State Northridge football players who sleep on them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1991 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carson Mayor Michael Mitoma, stung by criticism after he questioned the volunteer work of a city worker a community group wants to honor, has apologized for his remarks. The apology came after Mitoma was denounced for making "insensitive" comments about the amount of volunteer time contributed by Harry T. Foisia, a city employee and Samoan-American widely known in the community for his work with troubled youths. Mitoma issued the apology at Tuesday's City Council meeting.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN, Zan Dubin is a writer on the Calendar staff of The Times Orange County Edition
Don't much like opera? Can't cotton to chamber music? Never cared for ballet or modern dance or took an interest in theater? Poetry and painting aren't for you and comedy doesn't cut it either? Don't despair. There may yet be something to ignite your imagination at Arts on the Green this weekend. This year, the free, two-day cultural Whitman's Sampler will culminate on Sunday at 5 p.m. with a Samoan Flaming Fire Knife Dance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1991 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winfield Scott Park in Carson has seen its share of football games, family picnics and other outdoor activities. But today, it is the focus of a City Hall fight tinged with racial overtones about renaming the park for a former longtime city worker of Samoan descent. The Carson City Council on Tuesday stalled a drive by a group of residents to rename the park after the employee, Harry T. Foisia, who was known throughout the community for his volunteer work with troubled youths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1991
A civil rights suit asking at least $100 million in damages was filed Wednesday by attorneys for the family of two unarmed Samoan brothers who were shot to death in February by a Compton police officer. The suit against the city was filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. Pouvi Tualaulelei, 34, and his brother, Italia, 22, a football player at El Camino College, were shot by Officer Alfred Skiles.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI has launched an investigation into the shooting deaths of two unarmed Samoan brothers by a Compton police officer, officials announced. The federal agency began the investigation last Tuesday, the same day that more than 400 protesters marched around the Compton police station and City Hall, demanding a criminal investigation of the month-old incident. The Feb.
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