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Samoans Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Lotus-eaters, in Homeric legend, are a people who ate of the lotus-tree, the effect of which was to make them forget their friends and homes, and to lose all desire of returning to their native country, their only wish being to live in idleness in Lotus-land. --Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable Critics from the East sometimes call Los Angeles a land of lotus-eaters. This is meant as an insult. Gat Lum doesn't get it.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Lotus-eaters, in Homeric legend, are a people who ate of the lotus-tree, the effect of which was to make them forget their friends and homes, and to lose all desire of returning to their native country, their only wish being to live in idleness in Lotus-land. --Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable Critics from the East sometimes call Los Angeles a land of lotus-eaters. This is meant as an insult. Gat Lum doesn't get it.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tuni Simi hesitates only a bit before asserting that, no, he is not afraid to leave his tightknit Samoan community in Carson and go off to San Diego State on a full football scholarship next fall. Part of the reason he wants to leave, he said, is to shatter the stereotypes about Samoans that constrain many friends and relatives. "A lot of people think we're just big dumb guys who aren't that smart and only know how to play sports and be in gangs," said Simi, 17, a senior at Carson High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1989 | ANDREA FORD, Times Staff Writer
It did not take long for the little geysers of hatred to erupt earlier this month after local news outlets gave prominent play to what was described as a "melee" between Samoans, who had been attending a bridal shower in Cerritos, and Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies. "One guy called me the next day and wouldn't give his name, but he was furious," Samoan community activist June Pouesi recalled. " 'Why don't you Samoans learn to live here?' he wanted to know.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After eight days of deliberating manslaughter charges against a former Compton police officer accused of shooting two Samoan brothers 19 times, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury told the judge Tuesday that it had reached an impasse and a mistrial was declared. The deadlocked 9 to 3 in favor of acquitting Alfred Skiles Jr., who was the first law enforcement officer in Los Angeles County in a decade to be charged with killing someone while on duty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1991 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's late in the afternoon at Winfield Scott Park in Carson. Street-wise youths are sitting on park tables. Tennis courts are full, and about a dozen kids are practicing flag football on a field shared with a soccer team. The biggest kids on the field are Samoan. Their size, like that of their elders, is considerable. To the Samoans, that stature is a source of pride. And it draws attention. Yet, paradoxically, Samoans are among the South Bay's most overlooked, misunderstood ethnic groups.
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