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Samra University Of Oriental Medicine

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HEALTH
December 20, 2010 | By Sari Heifetz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Pungent steam rises from a boiling pot of a mugwort tea blended with wormwood and a variety of other herbs. Above it sits a nude woman on an open-seated stool, partaking in a centuries-old Korean remedy that is gaining a toehold in the West. Vaginal steam baths, called chai-yok, are said to reduce stress, fight infections, clear hemorrhoids, regulate menstrual cycles and aid infertility, among many other health benefits. In Korea, many women steam regularly after their monthly periods.
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NEWS
January 2, 1994 | JAKE DOHERTY
The Samra University of Oriental Medicine, the oldest and largest such school in the United States, has moved from Beverly Boulevard to a larger building at 600 St. Paul Ave., just west of Downtown. The move will enable the university to accommodate its growing student enrollment and the growth of its community clinic, said Timothy Timmons, the university's academic dean.
NEWS
November 28, 1986 | CONNIE ZWEIG, Zweig lives in Los Angeles. and
Even the most successful substance abuse programs claim success rates of only 30% to 40%. As a result, some Los Angeles residents suffering from addictions are trying a new tack: They're fighting needles with needles. Both hard-drug addictions and nicotine and caffeine addiction are being treated with the ancient Chinese healing art of acupuncture at the Turnaround Alternative Treatment Center on Skid Row.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1999 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government's crackdown on a vast spiritual movement called Falun Gong is resonating sharply in Southern California, where Asian immigrants and others have increasingly embraced the mystical ideology. Many local followers say they are deeply troubled by reports that more than 5,000 fellow members have been rounded up in China since the sect's beliefs and practices were outlawed there last month.
HEALTH
March 1, 1999 | KRISTL I. BULURAN
For those who have never tried it, the thought of acupuncture may conjure up images of needles, pain or discomfort. Nothing, however, could be further from the truth--except for the needles. Acupuncture has been practiced in China for about 2,000 years, and it has become an increasingly popular alternative treatment in the United States. Some health insurers now reimburse patients for acupuncture therapy.
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