Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSamuel A Jr
IN THE NEWS

Samuel A Jr

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
November 3, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
With the political composition of the Supreme Court possibly hanging in the balance, Senate Democrats urged their Republican colleagues Wednesday not to rush the Supreme Court nomination process for federal appellate Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. President Bush and his aides are pressing for the Senate to vote on Alito before Christmas, but Democrats said that would be hasty.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
With typical Midwestern bluntness, Sen. Charles E. Grassley seemed to say it all when he summed up the state of play on Day 3 of the Senate committee hearing on the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. "We've gone over the same ground many times," the Iowa Republican said. "The horse is dead. Quit beating it."
Advertisement
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
With typical Midwestern bluntness, Sen. Charles E. Grassley seemed to say it all when he summed up the state of play on Day 3 of the Senate committee hearing on the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. "We've gone over the same ground many times," the Iowa Republican said. "The horse is dead. Quit beating it."
NATIONAL
November 3, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
With the political composition of the Supreme Court possibly hanging in the balance, Senate Democrats urged their Republican colleagues Wednesday not to rush the Supreme Court nomination process for federal appellate Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. President Bush and his aides are pressing for the Senate to vote on Alito before Christmas, but Democrats said that would be hasty.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2005 | David G. Savage and Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writers
Samuel A. Alito Jr. was quickly branded a hard-core conservative after President Bush announced his nomination, but a surprising number of liberal-leaning judges and ex-clerks say they support his elevation to the Supreme Court. Those who have worked alongside him say he was neither an ideologue nor a judge with an agenda, conservative or otherwise. They caution against attaching a label to Alito. Kate Pringle, a New York lawyer who worked last year on Sen. John F.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2009 | David G. Savage
President-elect Barack Obama paid a visit Wednesday to the Supreme Court and chatted in front of a fireplace with Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., a fellow Harvard law graduate whose confirmation he opposed three years ago. The two will meet again at noon Tuesday, when the chief justice gives the oath of the office to the incoming president. Wednesday's meeting was described as a relaxed, get-acquainted session. It included Roberts, seven associate justices and Vice President-elect Joe Biden.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2008 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
John McCain and Barack Obama, the two leading presidential candidates, have set out sharply contrasting views on the role of the Supreme Court and the kind of justices they would appoint. Sen. McCain (R-Ariz.), in a speech two weeks ago, echoed the views of conservatives who say "judicial activism" is the central problem facing the judiciary. He called it the "common and systematic abuse . . . by an elite group . . . we entrust with judicial power."
NATIONAL
July 21, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Democratic and Republican senators alike lamented the increasingly sharp partisan divide over the Constitution and the courts Tuesday, and then divided mostly along party lines to approve Elena Kagan, President Obama's nominee for the Supreme Court. The lone maverick was Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who voted to confirm Kagan because, he said, she is smart, well-qualified and of good character. "But yes, she's liberal," he said, and paused. "Sort of expected that, actually."
NATIONAL
February 26, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - No one can sue the government over secret surveillance because, since it's secret, no one can prove his or her calls were intercepted, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, throwing out a constitutional challenge to the government's monitoring of international calls and emails. The 5-4 decision is the latest of many that have shielded the government's anti-terrorism programs from court challenge, and a striking example of what civil libertarians call the Catch-22 rule that blocks challengers from collecting the evidence they need to proceed.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court gave its approval Wednesday to displaying a cross on public land to honor fallen soldiers, saying the Constitution "does not require the eradication of all religious symbols in the public realm." Speaking for a divided court, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy said the 1st Amendment called for a middle-ground "policy of accommodation" toward religious displays on public land, not a strict separation of church and state. Kennedy disagreed with judges in California who said U.S. National Park Service officials must remove a small Latin cross from the Mojave National Preserve that had stood since 1934 to honor soldiers who died in World War I. The judges said the display of the cross on public land amounted to a government endorsement of religion.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2005 | David G. Savage and Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writers
Samuel A. Alito Jr. was quickly branded a hard-core conservative after President Bush announced his nomination, but a surprising number of liberal-leaning judges and ex-clerks say they support his elevation to the Supreme Court. Those who have worked alongside him say he was neither an ideologue nor a judge with an agenda, conservative or otherwise. They caution against attaching a label to Alito. Kate Pringle, a New York lawyer who worked last year on Sen. John F.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2009 | David G. Savage
With workplace age-discrimination claims rising rapidly, the Supreme Court made it much harder Thursday for older workers to win in court. The 5-4 decision reversed a long-standing rule. Many federal appellate courts had decided that if a worker could show age was one of the factors in a layoff or demotion, then the employer was required to prove it had a legitimate reason for its action apart from age.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
A bitterly divided Supreme Court on Tuesday tossed out a jury verdict won by a New Orleans man who spent 14 years on death row and came within weeks of execution because prosecutors had hidden a blood test and other evidence that would have proven his innocence. The 5-4 decision delivered by Justice Clarence Thomas shielded the New Orleans district attorney's office from being held liable for the mistakes of its prosecutors. The evidence of their misconduct did not prove "deliberate indifference" on the part of then-Dist.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|