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Samuel A Jr Alito

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November 14, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
He held the gun aloft for the jurors to see and urged them to take it into the jury room. He dared them to try to "accidentally" fire the trigger on the 9-millimeter semiautomatic Beretta. It was 1987 and Samuel A. Alito Jr. was the new U.S. attorney in New Jersey. He was assembling a staff and running the office, administering the budget and assigning assistant prosecutors to handle the caseload. But he took this one for himself -- apparently the only time he has tried a case before a jury.
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NATIONAL
May 2, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
With Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. writing his first opinion, the Supreme Court on Monday overturned the murder conviction of a South Carolina man and said his lawyers had been wrongly barred from arguing that another man had committed the crime. "The Constitution guarantees criminal defendants a meaningful opportunity to present a complete defense," Alito said for a unanimous court.
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NATIONAL
December 12, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein
With the recent release of two memos that Samuel A. Alito Jr. wrote during the Reagan administration, many Democrats believe they have found a smoking gun demonstrating his hostility to Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision guaranteeing the right to abortion.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court set the stage Tuesday for a major ruling on abortion by agreeing to decide whether Congress can outlaw what critics call "partial-birth" abortions through the second trimester of a pregnancy. The fate of a federal law, the first nationwide ban on an abortion procedure, is probably in the hands of President Bush's two new appointees: Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2005 | From Reuters
The nation's largest labor federation and a coalition of groups that represent disabled Americans said Wednesday that they opposed U.S. Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr., describing him as a threat to worker and civil rights. The AFL-CIO and the National Coalition for Disability Rights criticized Alito's work as a federal appeals judge over the last 15 years, charging that he has often sided with employers over labor with an excessively restrictive view of federal law.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2005 | From Associated Press
Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. recommended against appealing a ruling that revived a Black Panther Party lawsuit against the government 25 years ago, according to documents released Wednesday. Alito, who was working in the Justice Department of the Reagan administration, argued that the department could win the case in a lower court. "None of the legal issues presented by this case seems to warrant Supreme Court review," Alito wrote on Nov.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2005 | Maura Reynolds and Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writers
As a Reagan administration lawyer, Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. argued forcefully against the high court's landmark decision legalizing abortion and laid out a strategy to overturn Roe vs. Wade. In a lengthy 1985 memo, Alito -- then an assistant solicitor general -- urged the Justice Department to defend states seeking to put restrictions on the procedure, saying that the Supreme Court's rulings did not mean that abortion is "unregulable."
NATIONAL
November 2, 2005 | Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writer
Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. launched his campaign Tuesday to court lawmakers who could prove crucial to his confirmation -- moderate Democrats such as Sen. Tim Johnson of South Dakota, who found himself near the top of the judge's meet-and-greet list. Johnson, who rarely attracts national attention, seemed to relish being the first Democrat outside the party's leadership with whom Alito met. The senator was so far down Harriet E.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano and David G. Savage, Times Staff Writers
Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr., once seeking to advance his career as a Reagan White House lawyer, described himself as a dedicated conservative and said he was "particularly proud" of his attempts to end racial and ethnic quotas and establish that the Constitution did not give women a right to abortion. In a 1985 application for a high-level political appointment in the Department of Justice, Alito portrayed himself as strictly conservative and strongly partisan.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
With his nomination of Samuel A. Alito Jr., President Bush has offered the clear-cut choice about the Supreme Court's direction that activists on the right have been expecting -- even demanding -- throughout his presidency.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2006 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., President Bush's nominee to the Supreme Court, is expected to clear his first congressional hurdle today when the Senate Judiciary Committee votes to recommend his confirmation -- setting the stage for consideration in the full Senate as early as this week. Each vote is expected to divide largely along party lines.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2006 | From Associated Press
The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote next Tuesday on Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr.'s nomination to the Supreme Court, officials announced Monday night, and the full Senate will begin debate the following day. In a written statement, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) said he looked forward to a swift and "fair up-or-down vote" on Alito, President Bush's choice to succeed retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., who is poised to join the Supreme Court by the end of this month, is likely to have an immediate impact in the areas of abortion, religion and the death penalty. Alito's arrival also would set the stage for far-reaching changes in two areas of law that went almost unmentioned during his Senate hearings: election campaigns and the environment. Both issues are to come before the high court next month.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | Maura Reynolds and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
Senate Democrats turned up the heat on Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. on Wednesday, prompting testy exchanges during his confirmation hearing and ardent defenses from Republicans -- one of which moved Alito's wife to tears. As Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) defended the nominee against what he said were unfair insinuations about his membership in a conservative alumni organization, Martha Alito began quietly to weep behind him.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
With typical Midwestern bluntness, Sen. Charles E. Grassley seemed to say it all when he summed up the state of play on Day 3 of the Senate committee hearing on the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. "We've gone over the same ground many times," the Iowa Republican said. "The horse is dead. Quit beating it."
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Abortion remains the unbridgeable divide in American politics and constitutional law, a fact that was on display during the third day of Senate hearings on the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. For much of the day Wednesday, Alito -- who would probably cast the deciding vote on several pending abortion cases -- was a silent witness as senators told him why the Supreme Court should preserve or reverse its abortion rulings.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2006 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Democrats resembled a guerrilla army searching for a weak point in a heavily guarded fortress Tuesday as they challenged Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. at his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing. The array of issues Democrats raised reflected the breadth of their concerns about the record of Alito, President Bush's choice to succeed retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2006 | Maura Reynolds, David G. Savage and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. sought to distance himself Tuesday from conservative political opinions he expressed more than 20 years ago, stressing in his confirmation hearing that good judges did not allow personal views to color their legal judgments. But his comments were greeted with skepticism by Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, who said Alito's views as a Reagan administration lawyer probably signaled how he would rule as a justice -- especially on abortion.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2006 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Democrats resembled a guerrilla army searching for a weak point in a heavily guarded fortress Tuesday as they challenged Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. at his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing. The array of issues Democrats raised reflected the breadth of their concerns about the record of Alito, President Bush's choice to succeed retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2006 | Maura Reynolds, David G. Savage and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. sought to distance himself Tuesday from conservative political opinions he expressed more than 20 years ago, stressing in his confirmation hearing that good judges did not allow personal views to color their legal judgments. But his comments were greeted with skepticism by Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, who said Alito's views as a Reagan administration lawyer probably signaled how he would rule as a justice -- especially on abortion.
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