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Samuel Alito

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OPINION
November 27, 2005 | Goodwin Liu, GOODWIN LIU is a law professor at UC Berkeley's Boalt Hall.
ALTHOUGH abortion rights have dominated the debate over the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court, there is another issue implicating the "culture of life" that has garnered fewer headlines: capital punishment. The impending executions of three men in California, including the lethal injection of reformed ex-gang leader Stanley Tookie Williams scheduled for Dec. 13, are a sober reminder of the irrevocable stakes in this area of law.
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OPINION
January 27, 2011
By a unanimous vote, the Supreme Court has ruled that contract employees at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory must undergo the same background checks ? including questions about drug abuse and treatment ? that are required of government employees. The decision is defensible on the grounds of consistency, and such checks are a long-established feature of both public and private employment. But privacy advocates still have reason to cheer this decision. The court could have held that people have no right to withhold personal information from the government, but most of the justices declined to do so. Instead, in his majority opinion, Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. assumed for the purposes of argument that Americans have a constitutional right to "informational privacy" that limits what the government can require of them.
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NATIONAL
December 1, 2005 | Maura Reynolds and Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writers
As a Reagan administration lawyer, Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. argued forcefully against the high court's landmark decision legalizing abortion and laid out a strategy to overturn Roe vs. Wade. In a lengthy 1985 memo, Alito -- then an assistant solicitor general -- urged the Justice Department to defend states seeking to put restrictions on the procedure, saying that the Supreme Court's rulings did not mean that abortion is "unregulable."
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Six Supreme Court justices are expected to attend President Obama's State of the Union speech Tuesday, amid growing concern over the politicization of the nation's high court. A court spokesman would not identify which of the panel's nine justices would attend, but it appeared likely that Justices Samuel A. Alito Jr., Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas would be the three to skip the president's speech. Alito, who shook his head in disagreement as Obama spoke last year, had accepted an offer to teach law classes in Hawaii this week.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2005 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
Energizing his conservative supporters, President Bush on Monday named Samuel A. Alito Jr., a federal appeals court judge with a 15-year record on the bench, to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Alito was immediately embraced by Republicans who had parted company with Bush over the ill-fated nomination of White House Counsel Harriet E. Miers, who withdrew last week after it became clear that her prospects for confirmation were shaky.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Six Supreme Court justices are expected to attend President Obama's State of the Union speech Tuesday, amid growing concern over the politicization of the nation's high court. A court spokesman would not identify which of the panel's nine justices would attend, but it appeared likely that Justices Samuel A. Alito Jr., Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas would be the three to skip the president's speech. Alito, who shook his head in disagreement as Obama spoke last year, had accepted an offer to teach law classes in Hawaii this week.
OPINION
January 27, 2011
By a unanimous vote, the Supreme Court has ruled that contract employees at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory must undergo the same background checks ? including questions about drug abuse and treatment ? that are required of government employees. The decision is defensible on the grounds of consistency, and such checks are a long-established feature of both public and private employment. But privacy advocates still have reason to cheer this decision. The court could have held that people have no right to withhold personal information from the government, but most of the justices declined to do so. Instead, in his majority opinion, Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. assumed for the purposes of argument that Americans have a constitutional right to "informational privacy" that limits what the government can require of them.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
With the political composition of the Supreme Court possibly hanging in the balance, Senate Democrats urged their Republican colleagues Wednesday not to rush the Supreme Court nomination process for federal appellate Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. President Bush and his aides are pressing for the Senate to vote on Alito before Christmas, but Democrats said that would be hasty.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
With typical Midwestern bluntness, Sen. Charles E. Grassley seemed to say it all when he summed up the state of play on Day 3 of the Senate committee hearing on the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. "We've gone over the same ground many times," the Iowa Republican said. "The horse is dead. Quit beating it."
NATIONAL
November 2, 2005 | David G. Savage and Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writers
Samuel A. Alito Jr. was quickly branded a hard-core conservative after President Bush announced his nomination, but a surprising number of liberal-leaning judges and ex-clerks say they support his elevation to the Supreme Court. Those who have worked alongside him say he was neither an ideologue nor a judge with an agenda, conservative or otherwise. They caution against attaching a label to Alito. Kate Pringle, a New York lawyer who worked last year on Sen. John F.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court ruled Monday that cities and states must abide by the 2nd Amendment, strengthening the rights of gun owners and opening courthouse doors nationwide for gun rights advocates to argue that restrictions on firearms are unconstitutional. In a 5-4 decision, the justices said the right to have a handgun for self-defense is "fundamental from an American perspective [and] applies equally to the federal government and the states." The high court overturned 19th century rulings that said the 2nd Amendment restricted only federal gun laws, not local or state measures.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
With typical Midwestern bluntness, Sen. Charles E. Grassley seemed to say it all when he summed up the state of play on Day 3 of the Senate committee hearing on the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. "We've gone over the same ground many times," the Iowa Republican said. "The horse is dead. Quit beating it."
NATIONAL
December 1, 2005 | Maura Reynolds and Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writers
As a Reagan administration lawyer, Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. argued forcefully against the high court's landmark decision legalizing abortion and laid out a strategy to overturn Roe vs. Wade. In a lengthy 1985 memo, Alito -- then an assistant solicitor general -- urged the Justice Department to defend states seeking to put restrictions on the procedure, saying that the Supreme Court's rulings did not mean that abortion is "unregulable."
OPINION
November 27, 2005 | Goodwin Liu, GOODWIN LIU is a law professor at UC Berkeley's Boalt Hall.
ALTHOUGH abortion rights have dominated the debate over the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court, there is another issue implicating the "culture of life" that has garnered fewer headlines: capital punishment. The impending executions of three men in California, including the lethal injection of reformed ex-gang leader Stanley Tookie Williams scheduled for Dec. 13, are a sober reminder of the irrevocable stakes in this area of law.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
With the political composition of the Supreme Court possibly hanging in the balance, Senate Democrats urged their Republican colleagues Wednesday not to rush the Supreme Court nomination process for federal appellate Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. President Bush and his aides are pressing for the Senate to vote on Alito before Christmas, but Democrats said that would be hasty.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2005 | David G. Savage and Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writers
Samuel A. Alito Jr. was quickly branded a hard-core conservative after President Bush announced his nomination, but a surprising number of liberal-leaning judges and ex-clerks say they support his elevation to the Supreme Court. Those who have worked alongside him say he was neither an ideologue nor a judge with an agenda, conservative or otherwise. They caution against attaching a label to Alito. Kate Pringle, a New York lawyer who worked last year on Sen. John F.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court ruled Monday that cities and states must abide by the 2nd Amendment, strengthening the rights of gun owners and opening courthouse doors nationwide for gun rights advocates to argue that restrictions on firearms are unconstitutional. In a 5-4 decision, the justices said the right to have a handgun for self-defense is "fundamental from an American perspective [and] applies equally to the federal government and the states." The high court overturned 19th century rulings that said the 2nd Amendment restricted only federal gun laws, not local or state measures.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By David G. Savage, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Monday limited the use of life terms in prison for murderers under 18, ruling that judges must consider the defendant's youth and the nature of the crime before putting him behind bars with no hope for parole. In a 5-4 decision, the high court struck down as cruel and unusual punishment the laws in about 28 states that mandated a life term for murderers, including those under age 18. The justices ruled in the cases of two 14-year-olds who were given life terms for their role in a homicide, but their decision goes further.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2005 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
Energizing his conservative supporters, President Bush on Monday named Samuel A. Alito Jr., a federal appeals court judge with a 15-year record on the bench, to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Alito was immediately embraced by Republicans who had parted company with Bush over the ill-fated nomination of White House Counsel Harriet E. Miers, who withdrew last week after it became clear that her prospects for confirmation were shaky.
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