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Samuel B Roberts Ship

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April 19, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
U.S. warships and aircraft sank or heavily damaged six Iranian navy ships Monday as a major confrontation erupted in the Persian Gulf in the wake of the United States' early morning strike against two Iranian oil platforms, the Reagan Administration said. U.S. and Iranian forces fired on each other in the broadest and most direct conflict yet, suddenly escalating what for months had been a war of nerves in the volatile waterway. After ordering U.S.
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NEWS
July 31, 1988
The crippled frigate Samuel B. Roberts arrived at its home port of Newport, R.I., piggyback-style, its side still bearing rippled metal where an Iranian mine ripped through its hull in the Persian Gulf three months ago. "Glad to be back," Cmdr. John W. Townes called from the deck. The Roberts, cradled atop the heavy-lift ship Mighty Servant II, left Dubai in the United Arab Emirates five weeks ago.
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NEWS
April 18, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
U.S. warships attacked two strategic Iranian oil platforms today in retaliation for a mine explosion that damaged a Navy frigate and injured 10 American seamen last week, the White House said. Presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said President Reagan "directed U.S. forces at 1 a.m. EDT today to strike" Iranian oil platforms at Sirri and Sassan in the central Persian Gulf.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | Associated Press
The U.S. missile frigate Samuel B. Roberts started home Friday from the Persian Gulf on the back of another ship 11 weeks after an Iranian mine nearly sank it. The 3,600-ton warship rode in a special cradle atop the Mighty Servant 2, a chartered Dutch heavy-lift cargo vessel. Emergency repairs to the $400-million frigate's badly ripped hull were made at Dubai. U.S. officials said the frigate will be rebuilt at the shipyard in Bath, Me., where it was launched in 1986.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | Associated Press
The U.S. missile frigate Samuel B. Roberts started home Friday from the Persian Gulf on the back of another ship 11 weeks after an Iranian mine nearly sank it. The 3,600-ton warship rode in a special cradle atop the Mighty Servant 2, a chartered Dutch heavy-lift cargo vessel. Emergency repairs to the $400-million frigate's badly ripped hull were made at Dubai. U.S. officials said the frigate will be rebuilt at the shipyard in Bath, Me., where it was launched in 1986.
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | From Reuters
The mine-damaged U.S. Navy frigate Samuel B. Roberts will be shipped back to the United States from the Persian Gulf aboard a heavy-lift commercial transport ship, the Pentagon said on Wednesday. Pentagon officials said damage from the mine, which ripped a nine-foot hole in the Roberts on April 14, was extensive enough to warrant the shipment instead of allowing the frigate to sail home under its own power.
NEWS
July 31, 1988
The crippled frigate Samuel B. Roberts arrived at its home port of Newport, R.I., piggyback-style, its side still bearing rippled metal where an Iranian mine ripped through its hull in the Persian Gulf three months ago. "Glad to be back," Cmdr. John W. Townes called from the deck. The Roberts, cradled atop the heavy-lift ship Mighty Servant II, left Dubai in the United Arab Emirates five weeks ago.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
The loss of two frigates in clashes Monday with U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf could be a severe blow to Iran's navy, already depleted by its long-running war with Iraq and plagued by a lack of spare parts and poor maintenance. As many as half of Iran's 44-ship fleet may now be out of action, and the overall force is badly outgunned by the 25 to 30 warships the U.S. Navy has been deploying in and around the gulf, Pentagon officials say.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
After months of carefully avoiding confrontation with U.S. naval forces in the Persian Gulf, Iran has adopted a new and apparently far more aggressive strategy--and that strategy cost it two of its four best warships Monday. U.S. officials and academic analysts admit they were taken by surprise by Iran's decision to abandon its earlier, cautious approach.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan's decision to attack Iranian targets in the Persian Gulf was made Friday after U.S. military and intelligence officials determined "conclusively" that the mine that almost sank the Navy frigate Samuel B. Roberts last Thursday was deliberately planted by Iran to strike a U.S. warship.
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | From Reuters
The mine-damaged U.S. Navy frigate Samuel B. Roberts will be shipped back to the United States from the Persian Gulf aboard a heavy-lift commercial transport ship, the Pentagon said on Wednesday. Pentagon officials said damage from the mine, which ripped a nine-foot hole in the Roberts on April 14, was extensive enough to warrant the shipment instead of allowing the frigate to sail home under its own power.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan warned Iran on Saturday of "very costly" consequences unless it halts military and terrorist attacks in the Persian Gulf and ends its 7 1/2-year war with Iraq. "We do not seek to confront Iran," the President said in his weekly radio address. "However, its leaders must understand that continued military and terrorist attacks against non-belligerents and refusal to negotiate an end to the war will be very costly to Iran and its people."
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Like a battle-scarred whale, the Liberian-registered crude oil tanker Peconic plowed through the Persian Gulf's late-afternoon calm, once again on its way north to take on cargo. Some 25 miles northwest of this gulf trading center, the Peconic, its rusted, patched hull riding high in the water, had rejoined the flow of tankers that carry an estimated one-sixth of the world's oil, despite an increasingly lethal hit-and-run war against them. Following Monday's clashes between Iranian and U.S.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
The loss of two frigates in clashes Monday with U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf could be a severe blow to Iran's navy, already depleted by its long-running war with Iraq and plagued by a lack of spare parts and poor maintenance. As many as half of Iran's 44-ship fleet may now be out of action, and the overall force is badly outgunned by the 25 to 30 warships the U.S. Navy has been deploying in and around the gulf, Pentagon officials say.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
After months of carefully avoiding confrontation with U.S. naval forces in the Persian Gulf, Iran has adopted a new and apparently far more aggressive strategy--and that strategy cost it two of its four best warships Monday. U.S. officials and academic analysts admit they were taken by surprise by Iran's decision to abandon its earlier, cautious approach.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan's decision to attack Iranian targets in the Persian Gulf was made Friday after U.S. military and intelligence officials determined "conclusively" that the mine that almost sank the Navy frigate Samuel B. Roberts last Thursday was deliberately planted by Iran to strike a U.S. warship.
NEWS
April 16, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The mine that tore a hole in a U.S. Navy frigate in the Persian Gulf was recently manufactured and was almost certainly planted by Iran, U.S. government sources said Friday. The mine, of the same type as those seized aboard an Iranian mine-laying ship last September, was one of four spotted by the crew of the frigate Samuel B. Roberts shortly before an explosion ripped into the ship's hull, officials said.
NEWS
April 16, 1988 | From From a Times Staff Writer
The Navy on Friday released the following list of sailors injured in Thursday's mine explosion on the Navy frigate Samuel B. Roberts in the Persian Gulf: Chief Gas Turbine Technician Alex Perez, 38, Los Angeles, seriously injured. Gas Turbine Technician Larry Welch, 26, Athens, Ohio, seriously injured. Gas Turbine Technician David Burbine, 23, Ashaway, R.I., seriously injured. Radioman 2nd Class John Thomas, 21, Slocomb, Ala., injured.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
Democratic and Republican presidential candidates Monday generally supported U.S. attacks on Iranian targets in the Persian Gulf, although the Rev. Jesse Jackson said the crisis raises new questions about U.S. policy in the region. Jackson, who voiced support for the Administration's decision, said: "If we defend our soldiers who are in the gulf, it's the right thing to do. On the other hand, they are there in the cross-fire of a very ineffective and bad policy.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | From Reuters
Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar has decided to cut short a visit to Europe because of the tense international situation. The U.N. chief, who has been on official visits to Malta and Switzerland, dropped plans to attend a U.N. meeting this week in Geneva after he was informed officially by the United States about the U.S. attack on Iranian oil platforms in the Persian Gulf, a U.N. spokeswoman said.
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