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Samuel Barber

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June 14, 1992 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
A dozen years ago, there was much talk about a "New Romanticism" in music, a return to "traditional values" having to do not with family and morality but with tonality. Such otherwise unrelated American composers as George Rochberg, David del Tredici and John Corigliano sought to make music more "accessible" via unambiguous tonality and the reintroduction of that most audience-attracting of virtues, melody. Writing tonal music is easy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the biggest disasters in modern musical history: In 1966, when a Samuel Barber premiere, "Antony and Cleopatra," inaugurated the new home of the Metropolitan Opera at New York's Lincoln Center, the elaborate stage machinery, teeming livestock and scores of extras marshaled by designer-director Franco Zeffirelli prompted one critic to compare it to "a group of children around a big, new Erector set."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to The Times.
Considerable recorded attention is being paid to such "lost" American composers of our century as David Diamond, Walter Piston and Howard Hanson. Surprisingly little, however, has been given in behalf of Samuel Barber (1910-1981), who seemed a few decades back to be on the brink of "classic" status and who is the composer of the chart-topping "Theme From 'Platoon,' " as the world now refers to his Adagio for Strings--a melody millions can hum but probably few can ascribe.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2003
MY mouth fell open when, in the article " 'New World' Order for Philharmonic" (Sept. 6), I read Chris Pasles make the astounding statement that Samuel Barber's "musical gifts may have been limited," but they included an uncanny ability to set the natural rhythms of English prose."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the biggest disasters in modern musical history: In 1966, when a Samuel Barber premiere, "Antony and Cleopatra," inaugurated the new home of the Metropolitan Opera at New York's Lincoln Center, the elaborate stage machinery, teeming livestock and scores of extras marshaled by designer-director Franco Zeffirelli prompted one critic to compare it to "a group of children around a big, new Erector set."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1997
The U.S. Post Office's next honorees in the LEGENDS OF AMERICAN MUSIC commemoration series are conductors Arthur Fiedler, Eugene Ormandy, Leopold Stokowski and George Szell and composers Samuel Barber, Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Ferde Grofe and Charles Ives. The stamps debut Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2003
MY mouth fell open when, in the article " 'New World' Order for Philharmonic" (Sept. 6), I read Chris Pasles make the astounding statement that Samuel Barber's "musical gifts may have been limited," but they included an uncanny ability to set the natural rhythms of English prose."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1987 | CHRIS PASLES
Music director John Currie and the Los Angeles Master Chorale will open a five-program series with Bach's Mass in B-minor at 8 p.m. on Friday at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 600 St. Andrews Road, Newport Beach. Soloists and a chamber choir of 30 will be drawn from the 140-member chorale. The size of the choir for the remaining concerts in the Friday series will vary from 16 to 24 members. The series will continue: --Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1993 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
Charles Ives (1874-1954) may be our quintessential native composer and the one true innovator in this mixed American bag. After all, he built his most characteristic music on his own, rather than European, models.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000 | JACK ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their final concert of the season didn't really begin till it was almost over. Only after a disappointing performance of a Rachmaninoff masterwork and a distracting interlude of children's choral music did members of the Pacific Chorale get down to business Sunday night and offer a performance worth hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1999 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Barber's solo piano music is not extensive, but it is amusing and witty; in Pollack's authoritative performances it occupies just 72 minutes' playing time. Except for the extraordinary Piano Sonata of 1949, however, all this attractive, virtuosic music remains steadfastly lightweight; it could give eclecticism a bad name. Still, Pollack makes it all sound important, embracing the sonata wholeheartedly, using deep resources and myriad details. The lighter material he imbues with elegance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1997
The U.S. Post Office's next honorees in the LEGENDS OF AMERICAN MUSIC commemoration series are conductors Arthur Fiedler, Eugene Ormandy, Leopold Stokowski and George Szell and composers Samuel Barber, Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Ferde Grofe and Charles Ives. The stamps debut Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1993 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
Charles Ives (1874-1954) may be our quintessential native composer and the one true innovator in this mixed American bag. After all, he built his most characteristic music on his own, rather than European, models.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
A dozen years ago, there was much talk about a "New Romanticism" in music, a return to "traditional values" having to do not with family and morality but with tonality. Such otherwise unrelated American composers as George Rochberg, David del Tredici and John Corigliano sought to make music more "accessible" via unambiguous tonality and the reintroduction of that most audience-attracting of virtues, melody. Writing tonal music is easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
Music director Yehuda Gilad and the folks at the Malibu Strawberry Creek Music Festival do not flinch from the big challenges. Gilad closed the current edition Saturday with a taxing, oddly sorted program mixing a peppy, post-modern premiere with two pillars of Romantic strife and resolution. At the heart of the program at Smothers Theatre of Pepperdine University lay Brunnhilde's Immolation Scene from "Gotterdammerung," itself a premiere of sorts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1992 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Never overestimate the sophistication or curiosity--of Los Angeles Philharmonic audiences. Thursday night, David Zinman of the Baltimore Symphony conducted the orchestra in music of Samuel Barber (1910-1981) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791). The soloist was Dawn Upshaw, a rapidly rising soprano much celebrated at the Metropolitan Opera and the Salzburg Festival. Those who attended the concert seemed to love it. But not very many attended.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1992 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Never overestimate the sophistication or curiosity--of Los Angeles Philharmonic audiences. Thursday night, David Zinman of the Baltimore Symphony conducted the orchestra in music of Samuel Barber (1910-1981) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791). The soloist was Dawn Upshaw, a rapidly rising soprano much celebrated at the Metropolitan Opera and the Salzburg Festival. Those who attended the concert seemed to love it. But not very many attended.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to The Times.
Considerable recorded attention is being paid to such "lost" American composers of our century as David Diamond, Walter Piston and Howard Hanson. Surprisingly little, however, has been given in behalf of Samuel Barber (1910-1981), who seemed a few decades back to be on the brink of "classic" status and who is the composer of the chart-topping "Theme From 'Platoon,' " as the world now refers to his Adagio for Strings--a melody millions can hum but probably few can ascribe.
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