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Samuel Belzberg

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BUSINESS
August 19, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FarWest Savings had long been a good investment for the Belzberg brothers of Canada--Samuel, Hyman and William. Acquiring FarWest in 1974 gave the Belzbergs a foothold in the United States. Then, using the Newport Beach thrift and First City Financial Corp. Ltd. in Vancouver, Canada, they became among the most feared corporate raiders and takeover strategists on the U.S. scene during the 1980s. Often acting as greenmailers, their hostile bids made them millions of dollars. But today, their U.S.
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NEWS
February 9, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the Simon Wiesenthal Center, Sunday's gala was a memorable evening to salute a museum dedicated to remembrance. * The black-tie dinner at the Beverly Hilton celebrated the opening of the $50-million, eight-story Beit Hashoah Museum of Tolerance in West Los Angeles. It also honored the legendary Nazi hunter for whom the center is named. Like most guests who had toured it, the honoree was markedly affected by Beit Hashoah, which focuses on the Holocaust as well as on racism and prejudice.
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BUSINESS
July 8, 1987
Samuel Belzberg, a financier based in British Columbia, approached Southland's founding family early this year about acquiring the operator of the 7-Eleven convenience stores, the Thompson family said in a government filing. Belzberg met with Southland senior executives several times, according to the documents. Belzberg said he was interested in buying the company at $65 a share and that he already held 4.9% of its outstanding common stock.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Belzbergs Unveil Debt Plan: The Belzberg family unveiled a plan under which it would give up control of First City Financial Corp.--the core of its $6-billion empire--to satisfy the beleaguered diversified holding company's European creditors. The proposal asks holders of $139 million in bonds to convert them into equity. If accepted, the proposal would leave the bondholders with 49.9% of First City Financial's common stock.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1991 | Associated Press
Samuel Belzberg, who helped build the Canadian financial empire of First City Financial with stakes in such U.S. companies as GTE Corp., Ashland Oil Co. and Southland Corp., has resigned as its chairman. Brent Belzberg, who took over as chief executive of First City Financial in March, said Monday that his uncle resigned because his aggressive approach no longer meshed with the wishes of the Vancouver-based firm's directors.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the Simon Wiesenthal Center, Sunday's gala was a memorable evening to salute a museum dedicated to remembrance. * The black-tie dinner at the Beverly Hilton celebrated the opening of the $50-million, eight-story Beit Hashoah Museum of Tolerance in West Los Angeles. It also honored the legendary Nazi hunter for whom the center is named. Like most guests who had toured it, the honoree was markedly affected by Beit Hashoah, which focuses on the Holocaust as well as on racism and prejudice.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1988 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department announced Tuesday that it will sue New York real estate magnate Donald J. Trump and Canada's wealthy Belzberg family for evading antitrust notification rules on corporate takeovers. At the same time, Wickes Cos. of Santa Monica agreed to pay $300,000 to settle similar charges with the government in a case arising out of Wickes' unsuccessful $2.1-billion hostile takeover bid in August, 1986, for Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FarWest Savings had long been a good investment for the Belzberg brothers of Canada--Samuel, Hyman and William. Acquiring FarWest in 1974 gave the Belzbergs a foothold in the United States. Then, using the thrift and and First City Financial Corp. Ltd. in Vancouver, Canada, they became among the most feared corporate raiders and takeover strategists on the U.S. scene during the 1980s. Often acting as so-called greenmailers, their hostile bids made them millions of dollars. But today, their U.S.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | JOHN O'DELL and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal regulators Friday seized insolvent FarWest Savings & Loan Assn., the large thrift controlled by the wealthy Belzberg brothers of Canada, because of mounting losses from junk bonds and bad real estate loans. The failure of Newport Beach-based FarWest, which had $3.8 billion in assets, ranks among the largest in Southern California. Federal regulators would not estimate the cost of the collapse to taxpayers, but one industry analyst said it could approach $500 million.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1991 | James S. Granelli;Times staff writer
Federal regulators tried to apply some unusual pressure on the wealthy Belzberg brothers of Canada in an effort to stop FarWest Savings from going under, said one source familiar with negotiations before the Newport Beach thrift was seized last Friday. The Office of Thrift Supervision, the source said, suggested that the brothers might find it difficult to win approval for operating regulated companies in the United States if they washed their hands of the Newport Beach thrift.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1991 | Associated Press
Samuel Belzberg, who helped build the Canadian financial empire of First City Financial with stakes in such U.S. companies as GTE Corp., Ashland Oil Co. and Southland Corp., has resigned as its chairman. Brent Belzberg, who took over as chief executive of First City Financial in March, said Monday that his uncle resigned because his aggressive approach no longer meshed with the wishes of the Vancouver-based firm's directors.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1991 | James S. Granelli;Times staff writer
Federal regulators tried to apply some unusual pressure on the wealthy Belzberg brothers of Canada in an effort to stop FarWest Savings from going under, said one source familiar with negotiations before the Newport Beach thrift was seized last Friday. The Office of Thrift Supervision, the source said, suggested that the brothers might find it difficult to win approval for operating regulated companies in the United States if they washed their hands of the Newport Beach thrift.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | JOHN O'DELL and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal regulators Friday seized insolvent FarWest Savings & Loan Assn., the large thrift controlled by the wealthy Belzberg brothers of Canada, because of mounting losses from junk bonds and bad real estate loans. The failure of Newport Beach-based FarWest, which had $3.8 billion in assets, ranks among the largest in Southern California. Federal regulators would not estimate the cost of the collapse to taxpayers, but one industry analyst said it could approach $500 million.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FarWest Savings had long been a good investment for the Belzberg brothers of Canada--Samuel, Hyman and William. Acquiring FarWest in 1974 gave the Belzbergs a foothold in the United States. Then, using the thrift and and First City Financial Corp. Ltd. in Vancouver, Canada, they became among the most feared corporate raiders and takeover strategists on the U.S. scene during the 1980s. Often acting as so-called greenmailers, their hostile bids made them millions of dollars. But today, their U.S.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FarWest Savings had long been a good investment for the Belzberg brothers of Canada--Samuel, Hyman and William. Acquiring FarWest in 1974 gave the Belzbergs a foothold in the United States. Then, using the Newport Beach thrift and First City Financial Corp. Ltd. in Vancouver, Canada, they became among the most feared corporate raiders and takeover strategists on the U.S. scene during the 1980s. Often acting as greenmailers, their hostile bids made them millions of dollars. But today, their U.S.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1989 | From Reuters
Shares of Armstrong World Industries Inc. soared Wednesday after a group controlled by Canada's Belzberg family said it would try to acquire the Lancaster, Pa.-based maker of home furnishings. Armstrong rose $4.375 to $47.875 a share and was the most heavily traded issue on the New York Stock Exchange after the Belzberg group said it had acquired a 9.85% stake in the firm. "We have no interest in meeting with the Belzbergs," Armstrong Chairman William W.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1988 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
Several takeover artists have inquired about the possibility of buying Newhall Land & Farming, but Newhall did not disclose the inquiries before its unit holders approved management-supported takeover defenses earlier this week, a judge was told Friday. William S. Lerach, a lawyer for several dissident unit holders who have filed a class-action lawsuit against Newhall to overturn the anti-takeover measures, said financiers Roy E. Disney, Robert M.
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