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Samuel Berger

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OPINION
July 25, 1999 | Doyle McManus, Doyle McManus is the Washington bureau chief for The Times
Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger has been Bill Clinton's closest foreign-policy advisor for almost 20 years, ever since Clinton was a little-known governor of Arkansas who dreamed of running for the White House. Today, as Clinton's national security advisor, Berger is the pivotal figure in U.S. foreign policy--most influential and closest to the president's thinking of any top aide. During the war over Kosovo, officials say, it was Berger who held the tiller of U.S.
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NATIONAL
June 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Sandy Berger, a national security advisor to President Clinton, was voluntarily disbarred from the practice of law by the D.C. Court of Appeals. Berger agreed last month to relinquish his law license to the D.C. Board on Professional Responsibility, a part of the D.C. Bar, rather than submit to an investigation by the bar's counsel of his removal of classified documents from the National Archives. A three-member panel of the D.C. appellate court approved the plan.
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NEWS
May 2, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a high-profile speech, National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger on Friday accused Congress of risking the United States' global leadership and the nation's economic well-being by refusing to authorize U.S. payments to the United Nations and the International Monetary Fund. "Our nation faces a profoundly important choice," Berger said. "We can continue . . . working with others to seize the opportunities of the global era . . . or we can seek refuge in an illusory withdrawal.
NATIONAL
December 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
President Clinton's national security advisor removed classified documents from the National Archives, hid them under a construction trailer and later returned to retrieve them, the agency's internal watchdog said Wednesday. The report was issued more than a year after Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger pleaded guilty and received a criminal sentence for removing the documents.
NEWS
May 26, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Before he became President Clinton's deputy national security adviser last January, Samuel (Sandy) Berger represented Payless Shoe Stores, a major importer of Chinese footwear, in lobbying for an extension of China's most-favored-nation trade status. Is Berger's lobbying a conflict of interest that disqualifies him from taking part in the talks on China's trade status? No, White House counsel Bernard Nussbaum ruled recently. Two weeks ago, in a letter to Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R-Va.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glaring in its absence from last week's naming of President-elect Bill Clinton's economic policy team was a candidate for the critical job of U.S. trade representative. Clinton apparently is having trouble deciding not only whom he wants to fill the post, but what he wants to do about two key ongoing trade negotiations that are tantalizingly close to completion: the free trade agreement with Mexico and Canada and the 108-nation Uruguay Round of trade talks.
NEWS
September 12, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger testified Thursday that sloppy White House procedures allowed some Democratic donors with questionable reputations--and their foreign guests--to meet with President Clinton and his top aides. But Berger, the highest-ranking White House aide to appear before the Senate fund-raising hearings to date, insisted that the visits did not influence U.S.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger, national security advisor under President Clinton, was fined $50,000 for taking classified documents from the National Archives. U.S. Magistrate Judge Deborah Robinson handed down the punishment in federal court, stiffening the $10,000 fine recommended by government lawyers. Under the deal, Berger avoids prison time, but he must surrender access to classified government materials for three years.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. drug czar Barry R. McCaffrey and U.S. National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger paid a surprise visit Wednesday to Mexico, whose anti-drug program is in chaos after a series of scandals and a battle to be designated an American ally in the drug war.
NEWS
November 11, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger, President Clinton's national security advisor, agreed Monday to pay $23,043 for failing to sell Amoco Corp. stock until 15 months after government attorneys advised him to do so.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger, national security advisor under President Clinton, was fined $50,000 for taking classified documents from the National Archives. U.S. Magistrate Judge Deborah Robinson handed down the punishment in federal court, stiffening the $10,000 fine recommended by government lawyers. Under the deal, Berger avoids prison time, but he must surrender access to classified government materials for three years.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2004 | Richard B. Schmitt and Matea Gold, Times Staff Writers
Republicans and Democrats traded political shots Wednesday over the disclosure that former national security advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger removed classified documents from the National Archives last summer. Congressional Republicans, warning that national security had been threatened, announced an investigation into the matter Wednesday. Democrats demanded to see Bush administration correspondence on the issue and accused the White House of leaking the story for political advantage.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2004 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Former national security advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger withdrew Tuesday as an advisor to the presidential campaign of Sen. John F. Kerry after the disclosure that he was being investigated for the mishandling of classified documents from his years in the Clinton administration.
OPINION
July 25, 1999 | Doyle McManus, Doyle McManus is the Washington bureau chief for The Times
Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger has been Bill Clinton's closest foreign-policy advisor for almost 20 years, ever since Clinton was a little-known governor of Arkansas who dreamed of running for the White House. Today, as Clinton's national security advisor, Berger is the pivotal figure in U.S. foreign policy--most influential and closest to the president's thinking of any top aide. During the war over Kosovo, officials say, it was Berger who held the tiller of U.S.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a high-profile speech, National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger on Friday accused Congress of risking the United States' global leadership and the nation's economic well-being by refusing to authorize U.S. payments to the United Nations and the International Monetary Fund. "Our nation faces a profoundly important choice," Berger said. "We can continue . . . working with others to seize the opportunities of the global era . . . or we can seek refuge in an illusory withdrawal.
NEWS
November 11, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger, President Clinton's national security advisor, agreed Monday to pay $23,043 for failing to sell Amoco Corp. stock until 15 months after government attorneys advised him to do so.
NEWS
December 6, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger and Bill Clinton have known each other, as the president said Thursday, "since we were about half our present age," putting the newly named White House national security advisor into the forefront of the fraternity known as "friends of Bill." But it is more than a friendship--started when both men were working in the failed presidential campaign of Sen. George S.
NEWS
December 6, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, laying the foundation for his second-term Cabinet, nominated U.N. Ambassador Madeleine Albright on Thursday to be the nation's first female secretary of State and chose retiring Republican Sen. William S. Cohen of Maine to be secretary of Defense. Ending a tortuous search for a national security team, Clinton also named National Security Advisor Anthony Lake to run the troubled Central Intelligence Agency and filled Lake's current post with his deputy, Samuel R.
NEWS
September 12, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger testified Thursday that sloppy White House procedures allowed some Democratic donors with questionable reputations--and their foreign guests--to meet with President Clinton and his top aides. But Berger, the highest-ranking White House aide to appear before the Senate fund-raising hearings to date, insisted that the visits did not influence U.S.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. drug czar Barry R. McCaffrey and U.S. National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger paid a surprise visit Wednesday to Mexico, whose anti-drug program is in chaos after a series of scandals and a battle to be designated an American ally in the drug war.
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