Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSamuel Broder
IN THE NEWS

Samuel Broder

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 24, 1988
President Reagan plans to name Dr. Samuel Broder, 43, a cancer researcher who has become famous for proving that the drug AZT is effective in treating AIDS, director of the National Cancer Institute, senior federal health officials said. Broder declined to comment on the reports of his appointment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 24, 1988
President Reagan plans to name Dr. Samuel Broder, 43, a cancer researcher who has become famous for proving that the drug AZT is effective in treating AIDS, director of the National Cancer Institute, senior federal health officials said. Broder declined to comment on the reports of his appointment.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 2, 1989 | From Times wire services
A drug used to deworm farm animals combined with a common cancer drug has been found to save the lives of patients who would have died from an advanced type of colon cancer, the National Cancer Institute announced today. NCI Director Samuel Broder said that a national study involving about 1,300 patients with a stage-3 colon cancer showed increased survival rates for those treated with a drug called levamisole in combination with 5-fluorouracil, a cancer drug now in common use.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | SHARI ROAN
If the tobacco industry really wants to prevent children and teen-agers from smoking, it would stop advertising to them, argues Dr. Samuel Broder, director of the National Cancer Institute and one of the highest-ranking U.S. health officials. In an editorial in last week's Journal of the American Medical Assn., Broder throws the latest punch in an ongoing war between health officials and tobacco executives about whether cigarette advertising encourages children to smoke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Based on an unproven theory, two scientists have applied for a patent on a novel treatment for AIDS: repeated injections of the Salk polio vaccine. Allen D. Allen, director of research at Algorithms Inc., a biomedical firm in Northridge, said in an article to be published in June in the journal Medical Hypotheses that such hyperimmunization could prolong the lives of AIDS patients.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | Associated Press
An anti-viral drug has been shown for the first time to reduce fevers in AIDS patients, boost their immune systems and eliminate some infections, researchers said today.
NEWS
October 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Leading researchers are criticizing as irresponsible and premature the announcement by a French medical team that it has successfully battled the AIDS virus with an anti-rejection drug commonly used in organ transplants. "There's not a scientist I know who'd give something for one week to six patients and make an announcement in the press," said Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, a top AIDS researcher at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | Associated Press
Research with mice indicates that it may be possible to treat fetuses infected with the AIDS virus in the womb, a preliminary finding that scientists said could lead to decreased symptoms and prolonged life for the youngest victims of the deadly disease. Researchers said Thursday that they infected mice in the womb with a retrovirus distantly related to the one that causes AIDS and were able to delay nervous system symptoms of the resulting disease with an antiviral drug.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge ruled Thursday that scientists at Burroughs Wellcome Co. are the sole inventors of the AIDS drug AZT, meaning that two companies seeking to make and market a cheaper generic version will not be allowed to do so soon. The decision upholds Burroughs' exclusive patent on AZT, the most widely prescribed AIDS treatment. But it is expected to be reviewed by an appeals court.
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Federal health officials said Friday that the government is accelerating development of a newly synthesized drug for treatment of AIDS in the hope that competition among alternatives will force down the high price of medication. The new drug is cyano-thymidine, one of a family of experimental chemicals that is intended to suppress reproduction of the AIDS virus in the cells of human patients while minimizing toxic side effects.
NEWS
July 25, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Rock Hudson has AIDS and has been suffering from the usually fatal disease for more than a year, a spokeswoman said today. The 59-year-old actor, whose emaciated looks in a TV appearance with former co-star Doris Day a week ago startled his fans, is also being treated at the American Hospital of Paris for an undetermined liver ailment, his spokeswoman, Yanou Collart, said. The statement she read to reporters said: "Rock Hudson has acquired immune deficiency syndrome."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|