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Samuel Donlavy

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June 23, 1996 | Victoria Looseleaf, Victoria Looseleaf is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Chicago Bulls star Dennis Rodman may be a foot taller than 28-year-old dancer-choreographer-producer Samuel Donlavy, and the renegade basketball player may sport a host of tattoos and body piercings to Donlavy's unadorned body, but the duo has this in common: They are both amazing rebounders. In Rodman's case, it's all in his external moves; in Donlavy's case, it's an interior talent: He has bounced back from devastating personal loss and physical ailment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Dancer-choreographer Samuel Donlavy attempted over the weekend to reclaim the place in the local contemporary scene that he occupied more than 10 years ago before a series of crises interrupted his career. "I am home and I have come back to dance," he declared at the beginning of his Saturday program at Studio A in Silver Lake -- a three-hour event titled "Rejoice and Celebration." "I am HIV-positive for 20 years strong," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Young L.A. choreographers are scared--feeling battered by unseen forces, overwhelmed by a threatening future. That's the message you get from "Voices in Motion 5," the latest showcase of emerging contemporary locals, seen Sunday at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions in Hollywood. Well-crafted and capably performed, nearly all the nine pieces on view are steeped in trepidation and danced to apocalyptic soundscores.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Young L.A. choreographers are scared--feeling battered by unseen forces, overwhelmed by a threatening future. That's the message you get from "Voices in Motion 5," the latest showcase of emerging contemporary locals, seen Sunday at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions in Hollywood. Well-crafted and capably performed, nearly all the nine pieces on view are steeped in trepidation and danced to apocalyptic soundscores.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Dancer-choreographer Samuel Donlavy attempted over the weekend to reclaim the place in the local contemporary scene that he occupied more than 10 years ago before a series of crises interrupted his career. "I am home and I have come back to dance," he declared at the beginning of his Saturday program at Studio A in Silver Lake -- a three-hour event titled "Rejoice and Celebration." "I am HIV-positive for 20 years strong," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Samuel Donlavy is an emerging, local dancer-choreographer born to a belief in dance as a vehicle for intimate, personal expression--and intimate, personal reception, too. In a program note for his seven-part "Color Me, HERE" performance at LACE in Hollywood on Thursday, he invited his audience to "color me, what-ever-you-may-like," and provided plenty of intuitive, poetic choreography to be individually interpreted or "colored."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1995 | CHRIS PASLES
In almost all the works choreographed by Samuel Donlavy and danced by him and his company Thursday at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica, a dominant impression nagged. Theatrical concept seemed to come first and movement second. It almost never worked the other way round. Movement did not generate concept. It didn't amplify it or allow alternative or unpredictable interpretation. It never developed its own logic. Sometimes it even diminished the idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
Along with repeats of previously reviewed Laura Gorenstein pieces, the Sunday afternoon "Voices in Motion" program at the Ivar Theatre paired veteran local choreographer Shirley Martin with relative newcomer Samuel Donlavy. If nothing else, the contrasts proved illuminating. Formed in 1982, the Martin Dancers welcomes participants from an extremely wide range of ages, physical types, levels of experience and talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
The "Voices in Motion" series, created as a showcase for emerging local choreographers, returned to the Ivar Theatre in Hollywood over the weekend in its third edition. The program booklet credits four government agencies with making possible ("in part") programs of the Inner City Cultural Center. However, this ICCC event was largely made possible by the choreographers themselves, who contributed up to $750 apiece in order to appear in the two-day, three-night series.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES
Theater and pageantry dominated the four-part installment devoted to Filipino culture in the "Voices in Motion" series Sunday afternoon at the New Ivar Theatre in Hollywood--to the detriment, some might say, of the promise in the series title.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1996 | Victoria Looseleaf, Victoria Looseleaf is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Chicago Bulls star Dennis Rodman may be a foot taller than 28-year-old dancer-choreographer-producer Samuel Donlavy, and the renegade basketball player may sport a host of tattoos and body piercings to Donlavy's unadorned body, but the duo has this in common: They are both amazing rebounders. In Rodman's case, it's all in his external moves; in Donlavy's case, it's an interior talent: He has bounced back from devastating personal loss and physical ailment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1997 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
Ah, pity the pining romantic. In today's whirring and detached society, where love is like a commodity that's bought and sold, lost and found, what's a person to do? Samuel Donlavy is that romantic, and, with his Donlavy Dance Company, he poses and attempts to answer that question in "Promise," a theatrical dance work-in-progress (only Act 1 was presented), that was seen Thursday at Highways Performance Space.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1998 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
Formed in 1984, "Cumulus" brings together a diverse group of artists each year to celebrate spring. "Cumulus '98," which bowed Friday evening at Studio A in Silver Lake, featured Charlene Gawa's art, poetry, and dance, with an emphasis on the latter. Under cardboard clouds, several performers seemed to transcend the two-dimensionality of the suspended bits of puffery with displays of lyrical emotion and outstanding technique.
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