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Samuel Fuller

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Susan King
Sixty years ago, maverick director Samuel Fuller won the Bronze Lion Award at the Venice International Film Festival for his gritty film noir “Pickup on South Street” with Richard Widmark and Thelma Ritter. Now, six decades later, Samantha Fuller, the filmmaker's only child, is premiering “A Fuller Life,” a personal documentary on her late father at the festival Sunday in the Venice Classics section. Samuel Fuller, who died in 1997 at the age of 85, certainly had a full and colorful life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By J. Hoberman
Not a guy to mince words, two-fisted writer-director Samuel Fuller began (and ended) his tabloid classic "Shock Corridor" with a spurious quote from Euripides: "Whom God wishes to destroy he first makes mad. " But he might just have well taken his epigraph from Allen Ginsberg's "Howl": "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked …" In 1951, Fuller had the scoop on the Korean War with "The Steel Helmet....
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
"Van Gogh was a great inspiration for me, a guy for whom life was work and work was life. I wanted to be like him, except I didn't want to go nuts and cut off my ear." — Samuel Fuller It seems only appropriate that the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's "Fuller at Fox" film series opens Friday with the most accomplished work Samuel Fuller made for the studio, 1953's "Pickup on South Street." Richard Widmark plays a pickpocket who makes a big mistake when he accidentally steals a roll of microfilm that the communists want.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Susan King
Sixty years ago, maverick director Samuel Fuller won the Bronze Lion Award at the Venice International Film Festival for his gritty film noir “Pickup on South Street” with Richard Widmark and Thelma Ritter. Now, six decades later, Samantha Fuller, the filmmaker's only child, is premiering “A Fuller Life,” a personal documentary on her late father at the festival Sunday in the Venice Classics section. Samuel Fuller, who died in 1997 at the age of 85, certainly had a full and colorful life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By J. Hoberman
Not a guy to mince words, two-fisted writer-director Samuel Fuller began (and ended) his tabloid classic "Shock Corridor" with a spurious quote from Euripides: "Whom God wishes to destroy he first makes mad. " But he might just have well taken his epigraph from Allen Ginsberg's "Howl": "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked …" In 1951, Fuller had the scoop on the Korean War with "The Steel Helmet....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Director Samuel Fuller, whose films reflected his experience as a Depression-era drifter, a World War II hero and a crime reporter, died Thursday. He was 86. Fuller died of natural causes at his home in the Hollywood Hills, said family friend Joseph McBride. Fuller, who lived in France until recently, had suffered a stroke several years ago. He became a copy boy for the New York Journal when he was 12 and a crime reporter for the San Diego Sun by the time he was 17.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | DOUG LIST
Now that the Persian Gulf War has ended and we're deprived of our daily dose of military briefings from Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf and Lt. Gen. Thomas W. Kelly, the perfect substitute is Samuel Fuller's Korean War film, "The Steel Helmet." Gene Evans, who also starred in Fuller's "Park Row" and "Fixed Bayonets," is Sgt. Zack, the lone survivor of his unit who is befriended by a young South Korean boy and then meets up with a black medic (James Edwards). This multiracial, U.N.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The film is like a battlefield. Love, hate, action, violence, death . . . in one word, emotion. --Samuel Fuller * Nothing changes faster in the film world than directorial fashion. In hardly any time, today's young firebrand becomes yesterday's phlegmatic hack. But over the last 30 years, one taste has remained constant: Several generations of maverick filmmakers have felt compelled to pay homage to Samuel Fuller by putting him in one of their movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Lim is a freelance writer.
A cigar-chomping newspaperman turned two-fisted pulp auteur, Samuel Fuller (1912-1997) never had much use for subtlety. His signature style -- lurid, didactic, in-your-face -- would seem to leave little room for ambiguity. But because Fuller's films were often more complex than his tabloid sensibility suggested, he spent a good deal of his career being misunderstood and battling controversy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
"Van Gogh was a great inspiration for me, a guy for whom life was work and work was life. I wanted to be like him, except I didn't want to go nuts and cut off my ear." — Samuel Fuller It seems only appropriate that the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's "Fuller at Fox" film series opens Friday with the most accomplished work Samuel Fuller made for the studio, 1953's "Pickup on South Street." Richard Widmark plays a pickpocket who makes a big mistake when he accidentally steals a roll of microfilm that the communists want.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2010 | By Lawrence Levi, Special to the Los Angeles Times
AD edited Warning Shadows Home Alone With Classic Cinema Gary Giddins W.W. Norton: 416 pp., $18.95 Gary Giddins is well known for his writing about music — he was a Village Voice jazz columnist for three decades, and his books, among them the biography "Bing Crosby: A Pocketful of Dreams," are revered. His writing about movies gets less attention only because he does less of it. "Warning Shadows: Home Alone With Classic Cinema" is his first book devoted exclusively to movies, and it makes me wish that the New York Sun — the short-lived (2002-08)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Samuel Fuller was a director with a signature style: blunt verging on brutal, partial to shock cuts and mega close-ups. As a screenwriter, this former crime reporter was no less distinctive, favoring hot-button issues and hard-boiled repartee. A superb new seven-disc set, "The Samuel Fuller Collection" ($79.95, Sony, out Tuesday), which contains two films written and directed by Fuller and five earlier efforts on which he has a writing or story credit, is an intriguing auteurist study that shows the Fuller personality both as the driving force of a film and as an (often powerful)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Lim is a freelance writer.
A cigar-chomping newspaperman turned two-fisted pulp auteur, Samuel Fuller (1912-1997) never had much use for subtlety. His signature style -- lurid, didactic, in-your-face -- would seem to leave little room for ambiguity. But because Fuller's films were often more complex than his tabloid sensibility suggested, he spent a good deal of his career being misunderstood and battling controversy.
BOOKS
November 17, 2002 | Clancy Sigal, Clancy Sigal, a screenwriter, is the author of "Going Away" and "The Secret Defector."
Sam Fuller's gloriously robust memoir is the inspirational book of the year, if not decade, for anyone even remotely connected to the film business.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samuel Fuller, who liked to direct with a cigar in one hand and sometimes a .45 in the other, received the accolades at a near-three-hour memorial tribute Saturday morning at the Directors Guild that had largely eluded him during his many years in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samuel Fuller, who liked to direct with a cigar in one hand and sometimes a .45 in the other, received the accolades at a near-three-hour memorial tribute Saturday morning at the Directors Guild that had largely eluded him during his many years in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Typewriter, the Rifle and the Movie Camera," Adam Simon's affectionate and illuminating portrait of feisty maverick filmmaker Samuel Fuller, airs tonight at 5 and 8 on the Independent Film Channel as an introduction to a series of eight Fuller films. When the 55-minute documentary's executive producer, Tim Robbins, remarks that Fuller made 23 films of "uncompromising power and integrity" between 1948 and 1989, he's on target.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Director Samuel Fuller, whose films reflected his experience as a Depression-era drifter, a World War II hero and a crime reporter, died Thursday. He was 86. Fuller died of natural causes at his home in the Hollywood Hills, said family friend Joseph McBride. Fuller, who lived in France until recently, had suffered a stroke several years ago. He became a copy boy for the New York Journal when he was 12 and a crime reporter for the San Diego Sun by the time he was 17.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the recent death of James Stewart struck a deep and wide chord in the American public, it's due in part to two films he made with director Frank Capra, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" (1939) and "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946). Stewart made a number of classic films, but in the end he was most cherished as the naive neophyte who took on a corrupt U.S.
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