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Samuel Goldwyn Co

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BUSINESS
July 20, 1993
Posting its first profit under the conservative management of Chairman Samuel Goldwyn Jr. since its initial public offering in December, 1991, Samuel Goldwyn Co. is considering a second offering this fall to expand its capital base. Says New York analyst Jeffrey Logsdon of Seidler Amdec: "Goldwyn had been a closely held family company, and when it went public, it presented a rare opportunity for the investor to own a piece of the company along with the Goldwyn family, who owns 86% of the stock."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2002 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Executives at Samuel Goldwyn Films, which just acquired for U.S. distribution the Mexican film "El Crimen del Padre Amaro" (The Crime of Father Amaro), say they are not afraid of any controversy the film might generate here despite the firestorm it caused in its home country.
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BUSINESS
August 7, 1995 | Times Staff Reports
It appears that Ted Turner has the inside track to acquire the financially ailing Samuel Goldwyn Co. movie studio, according to sources close to the companies. Turner reportedly paid a personal visit to Goldwyn's West Los Angeles headquarters in the last several weeks. Sources say there have been extensive meetings and intense due diligence going on between the two companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG
"* Angels and Insects," a Samuel Goldwyn Co. release, played on only two screens in New York to sellout crowds, giving it the highest per-screen average of all films in release. The picture will expand on Friday to Los Angeles and two other cities. Weekend Box Office *--* Four-Day Gross/ Screens/ Weeks in Movie (Studio) Total (millions) Average Release 1. "Black Sheep" $10.6 2,045 1 (Paramount) $10.6 $5,180 2. "The Juror" $8.4 2,205 1 (Columbia) $8.4 $3,815 3. "Mr. Holland's Opus" $8.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Samuel Goldwyn Co., Hallmark Reach Home Video Deal: Goldwyn's four-year agreement calls for the distribution of the company's movies by the newly formed Hallmark Home Entertainment. The first video is expected to be released in June, with titles such as "Eat Drink Man Woman." Officials said the pact could generate more than $100 million in revenue over the life of the agreement.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1995 | Times Staff Reports
More Turner Footwork: Turner Broadcasting Systems Inc. is expected to make a bid for Santa Monica-based Samuel Goldwyn Co. sometime this week. The Turner board is meeting today to discuss an offer in the neighborhood of $100 million for the financially strapped independent film and television production entity, which has about $60 million in debt. Also on the agenda of the Atlanta cable company: buying King World Productions Inc., the syndicator of "Jeopardy!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG
"* Angels and Insects," a Samuel Goldwyn Co. release, played on only two screens in New York to sellout crowds, giving it the highest per-screen average of all films in release. The picture will expand on Friday to Los Angeles and two other cities. Weekend Box Office *--* Four-Day Gross/ Screens/ Weeks in Movie (Studio) Total (millions) Average Release 1. "Black Sheep" $10.6 2,045 1 (Paramount) $10.6 $5,180 2. "The Juror" $8.4 2,205 1 (Columbia) $8.4 $3,815 3. "Mr. Holland's Opus" $8.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1996 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The struggle over Samuel Goldwyn Co., one of Hollywood's few remaining independent film distributors, ended Wednesday when billionaire John Kluge's Metromedia International Group Inc. announced plans to acquire the company in a deal valued at $115 million. Metromedia's offer comes in two parts: $42.5 million in stock--$5 worth of Metromedia stock for each Goldwyn share--and the assumption of $72.5 million in bank debt that Goldwyn was under increasing pressure to pay.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1996 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The future of financially ailing Samuel Goldwyn Co. was thrown into confusion late Monday when the European entertainment giant PolyGram withdrew a $62-million offer for the company's library of films and TV shows, sources said. Sources said PolyGram executives decided to call off the deal after becoming exasperated by continuing delays in getting a definitive agreement signed. They were scheduled to send a formal letter to Goldwyn on Monday night. The decision came after a Jan.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1995 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billionaire John Kluge threw a wrench into PolyGram Filmed Entertainment's plans to buy the film and television library of ailing Samuel Goldwyn Co. with an 11th-hour, $115-million bid for the whole company. Goldwyn on Thursday confirmed its executives received a $5-a-share bid of cash or shares from Kluge's Metromedia International shortly after the company announced its PolyGram deal. The bid includes paying $42.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dutch-owned PolyGram Filmed Entertainment is expected to announce today that it has agreed to buy the film and television library of financially ailing Samuel Goldwyn Co., according to sources close to the negotiation.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1995 | Times Staff Reports
More Turner Footwork: Turner Broadcasting Systems Inc. is expected to make a bid for Santa Monica-based Samuel Goldwyn Co. sometime this week. The Turner board is meeting today to discuss an offer in the neighborhood of $100 million for the financially strapped independent film and television production entity, which has about $60 million in debt. Also on the agenda of the Atlanta cable company: buying King World Productions Inc., the syndicator of "Jeopardy!"
BUSINESS
August 7, 1995 | Times Staff Reports
It appears that Ted Turner has the inside track to acquire the financially ailing Samuel Goldwyn Co. movie studio, according to sources close to the companies. Turner reportedly paid a personal visit to Goldwyn's West Los Angeles headquarters in the last several weeks. Sources say there have been extensive meetings and intense due diligence going on between the two companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1991 | ERIK HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plans to renovate the historic Fox Fullerton Theatre will continue despite merger negotiations between Heritage Entertainment Co. and the Samuel Goldwyn Co., said a spokesman for Landmark Theatre Corp. of Los Angeles, the theater's co-owner. Landmark is a subsidiary of Heritage. "If anything, it will probably speed up things," Landmark spokesman David Swanson said in reference to the planned $1.5-million renovation of the 65-year-old theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1995 | Elaine Dutka
Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) got plenty of attention when he scolded Hollywood about sex and violence in movies, TV and pop music. But, as The Times reports today (see Page A1), Dole's comments aren't changing the face of show business. Yet. The creative and business powerbrokers will tell you they've always been thoughful about what they produce. Here, then, are some snapshots of life on the front lines: SAMUEL GOLDWYN JR. Chairman/CEO, Samuel Goldwyn Co.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
PolyGram Weighs Buying Samuel Goldwyn Studio: The world's largest recorded-music firm said it is considering making an offer to buy the Los Angeles-based movie company. Alain Levy, president of the Dutch music and film company, which records artists such as Elton John and Sheryl Crow, said he expects to decide in two weeks whether to make a bid for Samuel Goldwyn Co. Goldwyn hired Furman Selz Inc. in New York earlier this month to consider "strategic alternatives" that may include a sale.
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