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Samuel Harris

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A black former Hughes Aircraft employee who worked on the company's affirmative action plan was awarded nearly $400,000 Thursday by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury, which found that the defense contractor had discriminated against him. Samuel Harris, 37, of Lake View Terrace, worked 11 years in Hughes' missile systems group in Canoga Park, and filed suit after he was laid off in 1989. Hughes "utilized my color," Harris said, to help recruit minorities, but never let him advance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A black former Hughes Aircraft employee who worked on the company's affirmative action plan was awarded nearly $400,000 Thursday by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury, which found that the defense contractor had discriminated against him. Samuel Harris, 37, of Lake View Terrace, worked 11 years in Hughes' missile systems group in Canoga Park, and filed suit after he was laid off in 1989. Hughes "utilized my color," Harris said, to help recruit minorities, but never let him advance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury on Friday awarded $3.5 million in punitive damages to a former employee of Hughes Aircraft Co. after finding that the company discriminated against him because he is black. The verdict came a day after the jury determined that the defense contractor should pay Samuel Harris, 37, nearly $400,000 for emotional distress and lost wages. Harris, an 11-year employee of the company, was laid off in 1989. He sued a year later. The $3.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | SANDRA SKOWRON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Faster than you can say "nex-x-x-t," Dr. Ben Swanson Jr. opens a drawer, extracts a clear plastic box and presents what will be the crowning glory of a museum dedicated to pearly whites and those who care for them. The contents of the box don't look like much--a fragile semicircle of hand-carved ivory held together with wire. But this lower denture, a rather uncomfortable-looking one at that, once sat on the gums of George Washington.
NEWS
January 24, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one knew it at the time, but being the first region in the state to feel the pain of energy deregulation has proved to be an advantage, if only temporarily. Last summer, as the area's utility became the first in California to adapt to energy deregulation, electricity bills skyrocketed, setting off events that threaten the economy and lifestyle of the entire state.
NEWS
November 8, 1986 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
They huddled together around a fire of wood scraps and cardboard boxes on the fourth floor of an abandoned building on the edge of Little Tokyo. Transients all, they sought warmth from the night's chill, safety from those who would prey on them. Only this time, Thursday night shortly after 8, the fire burned out of control. Suddenly, the five-story loft structure at 212 S. Los Angeles St. was filled with flames, a virtual oven with its brick walls containing the inferno.
SPORTS
July 16, 1991 | ALLAN MALAMUD Darryl Strawberry and Bill Doran and Maury Wills
Darryl Strawberry is a man with an excuse for every city and every state of mind. . . . New York was too intense for him. Los Angeles is too laid back for him. . . . When he was a drinker, he was too wild. Now that he is a born-again Christian, he is too mild. . . . The question is how effective the kick in the butt given Strawberry, the biggest Dodger, by Brett Butler, the smallest Dodger, will be. . . .
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