Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSamuel I Jr Si Newhouse
IN THE NEWS

Samuel I Jr Si Newhouse

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Tax Court decision published Thursday overturned a $609.5-million IRS ruling against the estate of publisher Samuel I. Newhouse. The Internal Revenue Service said it has not decided whether to appeal. The tax court sided with the estate on the only issue in one of the biggest tax disputes in the nation's history: the value of Newhouse's stock in the family's publishing and broadcasting operations at the time of his death in 1979.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major publishing shake-up, Tina Brown, editor of Vanity Fair, will relinquish her post and take over the venerable but troubled New Yorker this fall, it was announced Tuesday. Robert Gottlieb, current editor-in-chief of the New Yorker, said he was stepping down because of "conceptual differences" over the magazine's future with S.I. (Si) Newhouse, the media tycoon whose family owns both publications.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 28, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was early 1984, and a new magazine called Vanity Fair was suffering a birth agony of dwindling advertising, anemic circulation and regular editorial makeovers. On the fifth floor of his office in midtown Manhattan, ad director Douglas Johnston had finally admitted to himself that he didn't have a strategy for saving the magazine. And he was hoping--fervently--that nine floors above him, company Chairman Samuel I. (Si) Newhouse Jr. did.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major publishing shake-up, Tina Brown, editor of Vanity Fair, will relinquish her post and take over the venerable but troubled New Yorker this fall, it was announced Tuesday. Robert Gottlieb, current editor-in-chief of the New Yorker, said he was stepping down because of "conceptual differences" over the magazine's future with S.I. (Si) Newhouse, the media tycoon whose family owns both publications.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
About 350 authors, editors, literary agents and sympathizers staged a noisy sidewalk protest Monday to accuse Random House of destroying one of its key subsidiaries for financial reasons. "The bottom line is not the last word," read one sign displayed outside the publishing giant's mid-town headquarters, where a lunchtime crowd had to thread its way past police barricades. The protesters charged that Random House owner Samuel I.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
About 350 authors, editors, literary agents and sympathizers staged a noisy sidewalk protest Monday to accuse Random House of destroying one of its key subsidiaries for financial reasons. "The bottom line is not the last word," read one sign displayed outside the publishing giant's mid-town headquarters, where a lunchtime crowd had to thread its way past police barricades. The protesters charged that Random House owner Samuel I.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Tax Court decision published Thursday overturned a $609.5-million IRS ruling against the estate of publisher Samuel I. Newhouse. The Internal Revenue Service said it has not decided whether to appeal. The tax court sided with the estate on the only issue in one of the biggest tax disputes in the nation's history: the value of Newhouse's stock in the family's publishing and broadcasting operations at the time of his death in 1979.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was early 1984, and a new magazine called Vanity Fair was suffering a birth agony of dwindling advertising, anemic circulation and regular editorial makeovers. On the fifth floor of his office in midtown Manhattan, ad director Douglas Johnston had finally admitted to himself that he didn't have a strategy for saving the magazine. And he was hoping--fervently--that nine floors above him, company Chairman Samuel I. (Si) Newhouse Jr. did.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|