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Samuel J Watson

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September 2, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The special prosecutor in the Iran-Contra scandal has accused two aides to then-Vice President George Bush of "acts of concealment" to cover up White House links to secret arms shipments to Central America, sources familiar with the prosecutor's final report said Wednesday. In his upcoming report, prosecutor Lawrence E. Walsh says Bush aides Donald P. Gregg and Samuel J. Watson knew that the White House was involved in secret weapons shipments to Nicaraguan rebels.
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NEWS
September 2, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The special prosecutor in the Iran-Contra scandal has accused two aides to then-Vice President George Bush of "acts of concealment" to cover up White House links to secret arms shipments to Central America, sources familiar with the prosecutor's final report said Wednesday. In his upcoming report, prosecutor Lawrence E. Walsh says Bush aides Donald P. Gregg and Samuel J. Watson knew that the White House was involved in secret weapons shipments to Nicaraguan rebels.
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NEWS
May 1, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Despite continuing denials by Vice President George Bush and his staff, there is increasing evidence that two of Bush's most senior foreign policy aides knew at the time about Oliver L. North's secret operations in Central America in 1985 and 1986--operations designed to circumvent a legal ban on U.S. military aid to the Nicaraguan rebels. The two members of the vice president's staff--Donald P. Gregg, head of a four-man foreign policy staff, and Col. Samuel J.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Despite continuing denials by Vice President George Bush and his staff, there is increasing evidence that two of Bush's most senior foreign policy aides knew at the time about Oliver L. North's secret operations in Central America in 1985 and 1986--operations designed to circumvent a legal ban on U.S. military aid to the Nicaraguan rebels. The two members of the vice president's staff--Donald P. Gregg, head of a four-man foreign policy staff, and Col. Samuel J.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | Associated Press
A review of Vice President George Bush's office records turned up a previously undisclosed meeting between a Bush aide and Felix Rodriguez, a one-time CIA operative involved in the private support network for the Nicaraguan contras, it was announced Thursday night. A statement from the vice president's office said that Samuel J.
NEWS
September 8, 1987 | Associated Press
A former CIA agent wanted to meet Vice President George Bush in May, 1986, to discuss "resupply of the contras, " according to a memorandum released today, raising the question of whether Bush knew of such activities at an earlier date than he has contended.
NEWS
February 1, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alan D. Fiers, the former CIA official whose cooperation with prosecutors revived the Iran-Contra cover-up investigation, was sentenced Friday to 100 hours of community service for withholding information from Congress. In pleading guilty in July to two misdemeanor counts, under which he could have been sentenced to two years in prison and fined $200,000, Fiers was the first former CIA official to admit knowledge of the illegal diversion of funds from Iranian arms sales to the Nicaraguan rebels.
NEWS
September 9, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
Almost seven months before the Iran- contra affair became public, Vice President George Bush met with a retired CIA agent with "resupply of the contras" on the agenda, according to a copy of Bush's schedule released Tuesday by the congressional investigating committees. But--although the topic was scheduled for the May 1, 1986, White House meeting--Bush's foreign policy adviser, Donald P.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
In a move to revive U.S. influence in Central America and boost chances of new military aid for the Nicaraguan rebels, aides to President-elect George Bush are working on a new initiative in the area that may include direct talks between the United States and the Sandinistas for the first time in four years.
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Eight years ago, when George Bush made his first run for the Republican presidential nomination, Bush-for-President bumper stickers suddenly appeared on desks and doors at the CIA's sprawling headquarters in suburban Virginia. A former agency official recalled his surprise at seeing one of the blue-and-white stickers on a secretary's typewriter in the office of CIA Director Stansfield Turner, because it was an implicit gesture of disloyalty toward both Turner and his President, Jimmy Carter.
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