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Samuel Jr Goldwyn

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BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran movie executive Samuel Goldwyn Jr. sued Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. and billionaire John Kluge's Metromedia International Group Inc. on Wednesday, alleging he was fired by MGM without cause in August and earlier was duped by Metromedia into selling his independent film company with promises he could continue to run it. The Samuel Goldwyn Co. was first sold to Metromedia in 1996 in a deal valued at $115 million, besting a previous agreement with European entertainment conglomerate PolyGram.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran movie executive Samuel Goldwyn Jr. sued Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. and billionaire John Kluge's Metromedia International Group Inc. on Wednesday, alleging he was fired by MGM without cause in August and earlier was duped by Metromedia into selling his independent film company with promises he could continue to run it. The Samuel Goldwyn Co. was first sold to Metromedia in 1996 in a deal valued at $115 million, besting a previous agreement with European entertainment conglomerate PolyGram.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1987
Oscar Awards coverage, Los Angeles Times, March 31, Jay Sharbutt, Part I: "The black-tie ceremonies were televised nationally by ABC and aired either live or on a tape-delay basis in 85 other countries. Although efforts were made to keep it brisk and avoid more of the declining ratings that have plagued it for the past three years, the show often dragged." Los Angeles Times, March 31, Jack Mathews, Calendar ("Oscars Get Down to Serious Business"): "Monday's Oscar show was a gem to watch, both for the awards and the production, the first under the aegis of Samuel Goldwyn Jr. Goldwyn's decision to dwell on film clips, both from vintage films and from those pertinent to the nominations, kept the show rolling without the usual second-hour flat spots.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1987 | JACK MATHEWS
So much for the argument that the Academy Awards are elitist and that they ignore popular films. Monday night, a day after it had officially passed the intoxicating $100-million box-office mark, Oliver Stone's "Platoon" picked up four gold statuettes to go with the loot and established itself as the richest movie to ever be named best picture. At least, it is the richest by current monetary standards.
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