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Samuel K Doe

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NEWS
June 19, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Samuel K. Doe offered unconditional amnesty to Liberian rebels poised to overthrow his government, but the rebels rejected the offer and vowed to fight on. Doe said an amnesty would allow Charles Taylor's National Patriotic Front to form a party to contest presidential elections next year.
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NEWS
October 6, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not very long ago, it was an article of faith among Liberians anxious to see an end to their country's civil war that peace would return when President Samuel K. Doe left. Doe was captured by rebels and slain a month ago, and things have only become worse. Today, three armies, including a "peacekeeping" force deployed by five members of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), are engaged in full-scale war in and around the capital, Monrovia.
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NEWS
June 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Liberian government and rebels began peace talks in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Liberia Radio quoted President Samuel K. Doe as saying he would welcome an international peacekeeping mission to his West African nation if it is agreed to at the talks. In Liberia, officials took journalists to the international airport, 35 miles from Monrovia, to prove that contrary to rebel claims, the government controls the airport.
NEWS
September 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Liberian soldiers of slain President Samuel K. Doe on Monday doused buildings in Monrovia with gasoline and set huge fires that burned out of control, reports from the Liberian capital said. "No Doe, no Liberia! No president, no capital!" the soldiers chanted, according to British Broadcasting Corp. reports.
NEWS
June 25, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Peace talks in Liberia's six-month civil war are to resume today in Freetown, Sierra Leone, a week after breaking up in deadlock. There is little hope that the talks will succeed unless President Samuel K. Doe resigns, rebel observers said. The leader of the government delegation, however, said he expects a settlement. "We have come to make peace, and that is going to happen," Information Minister J. Emmanuel Bowier said.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 200 Liberian civilians were massacred in northern Liberia, and witnesses fleeing the country blamed the killings on government forces, a human rights group said. Africa Watch said in Washington that the slayings resulted from a Dec. 24 attempt to topple President Samuel K. Doe, who it said reportedly instructed troops to shoot on sight any suspicious person. Neighboring Ivory Coast reported that 8,000 to 10,000 Liberians fled there in recent days.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | Associated Press
Liberian President Samuel K. Doe, his capital under siege by rebel soldiers, has retained a Washington lobbyist for $800,000 to represent his interests here. Doe hired Van Kloberg & Associates starting June 1. The firm's owner, Edward van Kloberg, flew to Monrovia last week to finalize the deal, a spokesman said. "Doe doesn't need public relations right now, obviously," spokesman Mike Hogan said.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Surviving soldiers of slain Liberian President Samuel K. Doe bombarded rebels with cannons from the roof of the executive mansion in Monrovia. Two days after the coup led by Prince Johnson, one of two rival rebel leaders, shells exploded and gunfire crackled as rebel fighters scoured the city to flush out the holdouts, estimated to number about 230.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Talks between the Liberian government and rebels on a cease-fire in the six-month-old civil war broke down, but both sides agreed to return to talk again in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on June 25. Negotiators did not specify on what points the talks broke down, but they are reported to have agreed their troops should use restraint, even though fighting will resume. Food aid into the war zone reportedly will continue unhindered.
NEWS
February 24, 1987
Liberia diverted millions of dollars in U.S. aid over the past six years, according to a General Accounting Office report, and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) said he wants new aid cut off until the funds are accounted for. According to the report, $16.5 million of commodity assistance has not been accounted for since 1984; $12 million in economic aid was diverted between 1980 and 1984, and there has been no audit of the $66 million Liberia received in military aid since 1980.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Italian financier Giancarlo Parretti appears to have lost a close associate--who nearly became a financial backer--with the death of Liberian strongman Samuel K. Doe. Parretti, whose Pathe Communications Corp. hopes to take control of MGM/UA Communications Co. this fall under a longstanding buyout plan, has made no secret of his official status as a Liberian "ambassador at large," nor of his brief co-ownership of Air Liberia during Doe's regime.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Surviving soldiers of slain Liberian President Samuel K. Doe bombarded rebels with cannons from the roof of the executive mansion in Monrovia. Two days after the coup led by Prince Johnson, one of two rival rebel leaders, shells exploded and gunfire crackled as rebel fighters scoured the city to flush out the holdouts, estimated to number about 230.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The end of the line for Liberian President Samuel K. Doe was as ignominious as most of his 10-year reign: reportedly killed after being shot and captured by a rebel force as he arrived to confer with the Ghanaian commander of a six-nation "peacekeeping" force in his capital of Monrovia. A bare five months ago, Doe managed to mark his 10th anniversary as head of one of Africa's oldest independent countries.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Liberian President Samuel K. Doe was killed by Prince Johnson's rebels and his bullet-riddled body displayed at their camp outside Monrovia, news and government reports said Monday. Witnesses returning to the city center told the British Broadcasting Corp. that Doe died in a rebel camp where he was taken Sunday after he was wounded and captured by rebel forces in a fierce gun battle in the capital of his war-torn West African nation.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rebel group Sunday captured President Samuel K. Doe of Liberia, a State Department official said, adding that U.S. observers believe Doe was wounded during a fierce gun battle in Monrovia. "Our embassy has confirmed that he was captured," said the official, who asked not to be identified. Reports reaching Washington said that Doe was taken into custody by rebel Prince Yormie Johnson, who declared himself in charge of Liberia. The reports said Doe was wounded in both legs.
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Liberian rebels have killed 200 foreign civilians from the five nations that make up a West African task force in Liberia, the Ghana News Agency said Friday. The killings were in retaliation for the force's presence there, the agency said. A Ghana News Agency correspondent with the West African force said that rebels loyal to Charles Taylor began attacking the civilians shortly after the peace force arrived in Monrovia last Saturday to try to end the eight-month-old civil war.
NEWS
April 4, 1985 | Associated Press
William Henry Woodhouse, a former U.S. Marine, was convicted Wednesday of conspiring last year to overthrow Liberian military head of state Samuel K. Doe and sentenced to 10 years in prison. Woodhouse, a black American who was in a wheelchair, pleaded guilty to "mercenarism." He told reporters later: "Both my legs are paralyzed. . . . I am asking Dr. Doe to please have mercy on me." Prosecutors said during the two-day trial that Woodhouse and a Liberian, Elmer Johnson, were wounded Nov.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rebel group Sunday captured President Samuel K. Doe of Liberia, a State Department official said, adding that U.S. observers believe Doe was wounded during a fierce gun battle in Monrovia. "Our embassy has confirmed that he was captured," said the official, who asked not to be identified. Reports reaching Washington said that Doe was taken into custody by rebel Prince Yormie Johnson, who declared himself in charge of Liberia. The reports said Doe was wounded in both legs.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
Six ships carrying 3,000 West African soldiers arrived off Monrovia on Friday but did not attempt to dock as gunfire broke out in the port of the Liberian capital. The Economic Community of West African States sent the troops to enforce a cease-fire in Liberia's eight-month civil war, in which about 5,000 people, mostly civilians, have been killed.
NEWS
August 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Liberian rebels who control half of the capital have agreed to a cease-fire with the government forces of President Samuel K. Doe, diplomats said Monday. Doe's closest adviser, Sellie Thompson, was believed to have arranged the truce with rebel leader Prince Johnson without waiting for the president's approval, diplomats in Monrovia said. The cease-fire began Saturday, hours after government soldiers killed an American Baptist missionary in the capital.
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