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Samuel Kaplan

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NEWS
March 18, 1990 | DAVID LARSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't sugarcoat this. It ain't easy for any of us. --Samuel Kaplan Mollie Kaplan can remember half a century ago when she was 12 and met her husband, Samuel, at a Halloween party in the Bronx. She can remember elementary school penmanship classes, when she changed her name from the Molly on her birth certificate to Mollie because she had a bad habit of writing the "y" below the line. What she can't remember is whether she had breakfast, so sometimes she eats it twice.
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NEWS
March 18, 1990 | DAVID LARSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't sugarcoat this. It ain't easy for any of us. --Samuel Kaplan Mollie Kaplan can remember half a century ago when she was 12 and met her husband, Samuel, at a Halloween party in the Bronx. She can remember elementary school penmanship classes, when she changed her name from the Molly on her birth certificate to Mollie because she had a bad habit of writing the "y" below the line. What she can't remember is whether she had breakfast, so sometimes she eats it twice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1993 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
Ilene Segalove says she approached her new show, "Silent Conversations: New Photographic Stories" at the Julie Rico Gallery, as if she were making a film or video. Collaborating with photographer Guy Webster--"a real lighting artist," she said--and a host of individuals who have been listed on a gallery wall in a "credit roll," the well-known video artist has created 20 framed wall pieces that tell thorny little tales of life with style and offbeat humor.
NEWS
January 20, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
She's easily the most understated and dedicated and certainly the quietest of volunteers. If there were a way to add up the time and talent that Harriet Luckman has contributed to good causes, the total would be staggering. She also manages to run various Luckman homes with skill and grace. And in between she turns out some of the most beautiful needlepoint we've ever seen.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four California Raisins were jiving on stage at the Century Plaza. Then two new raisins--James Miscoll and John Argue--got in the act. The reason: food and grocers. Miscoll, executive vice president of the Bank of America, is the new chairman of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce; Argue, prominent attorney and the man who helped bring the Olympics to Los Angeles, is the retiring chairman. The event was the big tribute to the entire Southern California food industry.
MAGAZINE
October 10, 1993 | TRIP GABRIEL, Trip Gabriel, a contributing editor of Rolling Stone, has written about crime and criminal justice for the New York Times Magazine and Vanity Fair. He lives in Northern California
The man calling himself Harold Lansky checked into the Quality Inn in New Haven, Conn., on Aug. 7, 1991. The same day he took a taxi to the 500 Blake Street Cafe, a brick-walled saloon popular with lawyers, politicians and other members of New Haven's power class. Soon he was chatting amiably with the regulars.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Nestled in the bowels of a government laboratory in Atlanta, in a tiny room under constant electronic surveillance, a padlocked silver-and-blue freezer houses a set of vials whose contents, if let out, could unleash upon an unprotected world one of mankind's deadliest plagues. More than 5,000 miles away at a scientific institute in Moscow, a similar collection sits, frozen in liquid nitrogen at minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit, guarded by police around the clock.
SCIENCE
August 28, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tomas Foral, a 26-year-old graduate student at the University of Connecticut, was moving biological specimens from a broken lab freezer last fall when he came upon some samples collected nearly 35 years ago from an anthrax-infected cow. Foral moved two samples to a working freezer in the building and promptly forgot about the matter. Now, he is paying for this seemingly innocent and mundane act.
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