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Samuel L Jackson

ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
The shootings at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., have stirred up a slew of gun-control sentiment in Hollywood. But an actor who stars in perhaps the most gun-heavy movie of the season says that an abundance of firearms in this country isn't necessarily the problem, and that reducing them isn't automatically the answer. "I don't think it's about more gun control," said Samuel L. Jackson, who stars as a conniving house slave in Quentin Tarantino's upcoming revenge fantasy "Django Unchained.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON
During the last nine seasons of NBC's "Law & Order," there have been 7,000 speaking roles, give or take a few, according to show creator Dick Wolf's count. But it's the role being played by a particular "pretty woman" in the 200th episode of the drama that has Wolf floating on a cloud. When it comes down to it, there's something about Julia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
If there's been one controversy that's dogged Quentin Tarantino for most of his career, it's been his frequent and pronounced use of the N-word in his scripts, dating all the way back to his debut film, "Reservoir Dogs. " Perhaps the only time that particular racial epithet hasn't been central to the discussion of one of his films was "Inglourious Basterds," when the N-word of choice was Nazis. But with "Django Unchained," the controversy is back, and Tarantino is getting an earful from all sides, including fellow filmmaker Spike Lee and comedian Katt Williams, who have been very vocal in their criticisms of Tarantino's word choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1995 | Daniel Howard Cerone, Daniel Howard Cerone is a Times staff writer
On a bitter-cold January day in San Francisco, hundreds of extras gather on a narrow Chinatown street colorfully decorated with streaming banners and floats for a Chinese New Year's parade. Director William Friedkin, who staged celebrated chase scenes for "The French Connection" and "To Live and Die in L.A.," has worked up another one for his latest movie, "Jade," leading to this densely populated street. "Please, we're about to shoot," an assistant director shouts into a bullhorn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003
The title may not sing, but you have to say the cast is intriguing. Few young actors have grabbed moviegoers' attention as effectively as Colin Farrell ("Minority Report," "Phone Booth," Us Weekly) and Olivier Martinez ("Unfaithful") did in the past year. Add the perennially powerful Samuel L. Jackson, "The Fast and the Furious' " Michelle Rodriguez and LL Cool J, and you hope this promising crew has a good script. Contributors to this one include "Training Day's" prolific David Ayer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2003
Here are this week's key releases on video/DVD, available beginning Tuesday. *--* Video/DVDs BOX OFFICE (MILLIONS) DOMESTIC FOREIGN "Sweet Home $126.4 $7.6 (United Kingdom only) Alabama" Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas; directed by Andy Tennant "Igby Goes Down" $4.7 -- Kieran Culkin, Susan Sarandon; directed by Burr Steers "Formula 51" $5.1 $6.1 (United Kingdom only) Samuel L. Jackson, Robert Carlyle; directed by Ronny Yu *--* *--* Source: Internet Movie Database *--*
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