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Samuel L Westover

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BUSINESS
August 13, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SysteMed Inc., which eked out a profit for the latest quarter after two losses in a row, has turned to the outside for a new president and chief executive. Samuel L. Westover took over the job on Thursday after 14 years with health maintenance organizations. He said his challenge at SysteMed, which manages prescription drug benefits for corporations and insurers, will be increasing the company's earnings.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SysteMed Inc., which eked out a profit for the latest quarter after two losses in a row, has turned to the outside for a new president and chief executive. Samuel L. Westover took over the job on Thursday after 14 years with health maintenance organizations. He said his challenge at SysteMed, which manages prescription drug benefits for corporations and insurers, will be increasing the company's earnings.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 1988
* Robert J. Erra, president and chief executive of financially troubled Western Health Plans, is leaving the San Diego-based health maintenance organization to become senior vice president and chief operating officer of Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation in La Jolla. Samuel L. Westover, a consultant to Western since Nov. 1, will serve as chief operating officer until a new chief executive is selected.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | RICHARD CORE
Inefficiency is such a big part of the drug business today that Samuel L. Westover's company compensates for it every day. Inefficiency also is why Westover and other drug industry officials generally support President Clinton's health reform plan. Westover is president and chief executive of SysteMed Inc., a Laguna Hills-based company that distributes pharmaceuticals and manages prescription drug benefit programs for corporations and insurers.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1994 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wayne Lowell humbly attributes his zoom up the corporate ladder to luck. James T. Schraith was in such a hurry to get where he is today that he dropped out of college. Samuel L. Westover wanted to be a doctor but discovered he enjoyed crunching numbers more than peering into microscopes. Kelly A. Gray recalls as her inspiration childhood dinners where her parents passionately discussed their family business.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1995
How the Survey Was Conducted To compute compensation, The Times counts the executive's salary and bonus, the stated value of stock options granted during the year, the value of stock awards, and any long-term or annual compensation--usually listed as "other" compensation in corporate reports but including car allowances, insurance premiums, retirement plan contributions, special consulting or director fees and loan forgiveness and other special arrangements that benefit the executive.
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