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Samuel Mudd

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Richard D. Mudd, the patriarch who led a family crusade to overturn the conviction of his grandfather, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, for aiding Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth, has died at 101. Mudd, who took his cause to presidents, senators and the public and never gave up, died May 21 in his Saginaw, Mich., home of causes associated with old age. Even without its quixotic champion, the cause continues. In September, the U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Richard D. Mudd, the patriarch who led a family crusade to overturn the conviction of his grandfather, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, for aiding Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth, has died at 101. Mudd, who took his cause to presidents, senators and the public and never gave up, died May 21 in his Saginaw, Mich., home of causes associated with old age. Even without its quixotic champion, the cause continues. In September, the U.S.
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NEWS
March 31, 1993 | Associated Press
An attempt to clear the name of Dr. Samuel Mudd, who set John Wilkes Booth's broken leg after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, has moved another step in the Michigan Legislature. The House Oversight and Ethics Committee on Monday sent to the full House a resolution urging President Clinton and the Army to exonerate the doctor. The Senate has already approved the measure.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | Associated Press
An attempt to clear the name of Dr. Samuel Mudd, who set John Wilkes Booth's broken leg after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, has moved another step in the Michigan Legislature. The House Oversight and Ethics Committee on Monday sent to the full House a resolution urging President Clinton and the Army to exonerate the doctor. The Senate has already approved the measure.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even if his name wasn't Mudd, even if he hadn't spent more than seven decades obsessed by that skeleton rattling around in the family closet, Richard Mudd would be a pretty remarkable fellow. At 91, he's updating the two-volume, 1,800-page Mudd family biography he first published 40 years ago. He's planning to lead a tour of history buffs to a remote Florida island this summer.
TRAVEL
March 17, 1996 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
After John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theater in Washington, on April 14, 1865, he spent 12 days on the run before reaching Garrett's Farm in Virginia where he either killed himself or was shot by federal troops. Those 12 days are condensed into a 12-hour John Wilkes Booth Escape Route Tour sponsored by the Surratt House Museum in Clinton, Md. Every year the first tour of the season is held on the Saturday closest to the assassination--this year it's April 13.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | From United Press International
Queen Elizabeth II became an honorary citizen of the Florida Keys during a visit Saturday to a remote island fort in the Gulf of Mexico. Monroe County Mayor Wilhelmina Harvey, a 79-year-old scuba diver, gave the British monarch a Queen conch shell to commemorate the occasion. "It's the prettiest of all the conch species," Harvey said. The royal yacht Britannia was anchored a few hundred yards off the coral rock island, part of the Dry Tortugas chain some 70 miles west of Key West.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Queen Elizabeth II took a break Saturday from the formalities of her state visit by relaxing aboard her yacht off the Florida Keys. The two-day sail aboard the 412-foot Britannia was to be a restful interlude between last week's busy ceremonial agenda in Washington and Miami and the second half of the trip, which will take the queen to Tampa, Fla., Texas and Kentucky. The queen and her husband, Prince Philip, planned later in the day to tour Ft. Jefferson, a Union prison camp in the Civil War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her name was Mudd, and she devoted much of her life to defending the reputation of her notorious grandfather and ensuring that his historic Maryland home was preserved. Louise Mudd Arehart, a granddaughter of the Maryland country doctor who treated John Wilkes Booth's broken leg after he assassinated President Abraham Lincoln, died of complications from a stroke March 11 in La Plata, Md. She was 84. Dr. Samuel A.
NEWS
February 13, 1993 | From Associated Press
More than a century after his conviction, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd's appeal to clear his name as a co-conspirator in Abraham Lincoln's assassination was finally heard. That the defendant is long dead and the evidence long gone didn't matter. No real court agreed to consider the case. On Friday, the 184th birthday of the 16th President, defense attorney F. Lee Bailey argued Mudd's case in a moot court trial at the University of Richmond's T. C. Williams School of Law.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even if his name wasn't Mudd, even if he hadn't spent more than seven decades obsessed by that skeleton rattling around in the family closet, Richard Mudd would be a pretty remarkable fellow. At 91, he's updating the two-volume, 1,800-page Mudd family biography he first published 40 years ago. He's planning to lead a tour of history buffs to a remote Florida island this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1993 | NORMAN M. GARLAND, Garland, a veteran trial attorney, is a professor at Southwestern University School of Law.
Sometimes as I stand in front of the classroom in Criminal Procedure or Evidence, I see a hand waving at the rear and the student attached to it asks, "I have a question: On 'L.A. Law' last night the prosecutor. . . ." I gruffly interrupt and say, "Please do not confuse television and the movies with reality!" The student persists and I inevitably give an answer to the scenario described, but also explain that it is not realistic. Realism probably would not advance the plot.
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