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Samuel Pepys

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NEWS
January 26, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Sir Arthur Bryant, a prolific historian ranked in the tradition of Gibbon and Macauley and whose popular accounts of Britain's greatest days stirred patriotic hearts for decades, is dead. The New Hall hospital in the southwestern English city of Salisbury said Bryant died Tuesday night. He was 85.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2006 | Associated Press
A British academic says she has uncovered new details about the life of a famous literary paramour: the 17-year-old servant caught consorting with diarist Samuel Pepys. Pepys' journal describes the moment in 1668 that his wife discovered him in mid-embrace with Deb Willet, a young employee of his London household. He records that Willet was banished from the house, and she soon seemed to disappear from the historical record.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2006 | Associated Press
A British academic says she has uncovered new details about the life of a famous literary paramour: the 17-year-old servant caught consorting with diarist Samuel Pepys. Pepys' journal describes the moment in 1668 that his wife discovered him in mid-embrace with Deb Willet, a young employee of his London household. He records that Willet was banished from the house, and she soon seemed to disappear from the historical record.
NEWS
January 26, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Sir Arthur Bryant, a prolific historian ranked in the tradition of Gibbon and Macauley and whose popular accounts of Britain's greatest days stirred patriotic hearts for decades, is dead. The New Hall hospital in the southwestern English city of Salisbury said Bryant died Tuesday night. He was 85.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990
Concerning the Aug. 19 interview with rock musician Bob Geldof: Samuel Pepys lived during the Restoration period in England, not the Reformation (as Geldof was quoted as saying). The two periods were about 130 years apart: 1529 marked the beginning of the Reformation; 1660, the Restoration. KIM THORNTON Lake Forest
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early on in "Compleat Female Stage Beauty," which opened Saturday at the Old Globe, Shakespearean actor Edward Kynaston is horrified to learn that King Charles II is about to lift the ban on women appearing on stage. Kynaston had become a superstar by playing female roles and is in the midst of a triumphant run as Desdemona in "Othello" when his world starts to crumble. "A woman playing a woman?" he wails. "What's the trick in that?"
BOOKS
April 29, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
WHAT exactly is It? What did Marilyn Monroe, Charles II, Clara Bow and other "abnormally interesting people" have that the rest of us don't? It's not just about sex, though that's an essential ingredient; it's not just glamour or rarity, nor is it what Joseph Roach, a professor of theater at Yale University, calls that "effortless look of public intimacy." The genius of It, the It factor, is a combination of all of these and more.
MAGAZINE
March 16, 1986 | Tyler Marshall
The rows of drab warehouses that line the south bank of the Thames are hardly a mecca for international tourists, but just a few minutes' walk from the London Bridge underground station, sandwiched between a vacant lot and a railroad abutment, is one of the city's coziest historic pubs--The Anchor. The building is only a little more than 200 years old, but its style and decor, replete with bare wooden floors and open coal fires, are reminiscent of its predecessors.
NEWS
April 10, 1985 | JACK SMITH
Snobbish critics of Los Angeles architecture have always complained that its largest ornaments are the dream houses of the suddenly rich who have come here from somewhere else to realize their fantasies. There is no doubt that this year the Pasadena Junior Philharmonic Committee has chosen, as its Pasadena Showcase House of Design, a "castle on the hill" that was brought here in the dreams of an ambitious boy from Scarborough, England--Jack Pease Atkin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2006 | Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun
John Goodspeed, the former Baltimore Evening Sun columnist who collected examples of the city's linguistic train wrecks and christened the mispronunciations Baltimorese, died Sept. 10 of pulmonary fibrosis at his home in Easton, Md. He was 86. From 1950 until he stepped down in 1967, Goodspeed chronicled the city, its habits and people in "Peep's Diary," a weekday column that appeared under a sketch of the Baltimore skyline.
HOME & GARDEN
August 19, 1995 | THOMAS V. DiBACCO, TIMES-POST NEWS SERVICE; DiBacco is a historian at American University.
Bookcases are almost as old as books. Archeological remains from earliest times suggest that clay and stone tablets were kept in some arranged order by their authors or collectors. But it was the increasing number of Egyptian scrolls or papyrus rolls dating from the 4th Century BC that necessitated a special place for storage. The cylindrical shape of papyrus rolls made them easy to store on shelves.
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