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Samuel Ruiz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1995 | From Religion News Service
Encouraged by what he called "signs of hope," Roman Catholic Bishop Samuel Ruiz called off his 15-day fast this week after the Mexican government agreed to negotiate with the rebel Zapatista Army that is waging war in the Mexican state of Chiapas. The peasant uprising began a year ago--on New Year's Day, 1994--when the rebel Zapatista Army of National Liberation declared war on the Mexican government, seeking political revolution, land reform and broader human rights.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
For 40 years as a bishop in Mexico's impoverished Chiapas state, Samuel Ruiz championed the rights of the long-suffering Maya Indians who dominate the lush region. He learned their languages and adopted their customs into Roman Catholic practice. He also made powerful enemies among rich landowners, Mexican governments and even the Vatican. He mediated the Zapatista peasant revolt of the 1990s and was both praised for helping to avoid wider bloodshed and criticized for supposedly inciting the rebels in the first place.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bishop Samuel Ruiz has faced down death threats and overcome government pressures during three decades of struggle to defend Indian rights in southern Mexico. But now he is confronting a challenge that could end his fight: a Vatican body that oversees bishops reportedly is accusing Ruiz of "grave pastoral and doctrine errors," grounds for forcing him to resign. The charges have stirred a groundswell of support for Ruiz among human rights activists.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II on Friday appointed a bishop widely hailed as a conciliator to head the Roman Catholic diocese in central Chiapas state, where his predecessor's perceived support for the leftist Zapatista rebels generated frequent controversies.
NEWS
January 14, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government and Indian rebel leaders in Chiapas on Friday were arranging an imminent face-to-face meeting between top officials and the Zapatista National Liberation Army after the rebels and their political backers offered concessions for peace.
NEWS
January 14, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government and Indian rebel leaders in Chiapas on Friday were arranging an imminent face-to-face meeting between top officials and the Zapatista National Liberation Army after the rebels and their political backers offered concessions for peace.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a Christmas Eve announcement that analysts called a potential breakthrough toward a peaceful settlement to the conflict in Chiapas, President Ernesto Zedillo's government made a major concession Saturday to the rebels in Mexico's southernmost state, the Zapatista National Liberation Army.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A faint hope for peace Sunday has once again placed Samuel Ruiz, the outspoken bishop of this embattled diocese, at the center of a conflict over indigenous rights just as the Mexican government seeks to blame Roman Catholic priests for last week's peasant uprising. Ruiz was asked to mediate in the armed insurrection by a group claiming to represent rebels of the Zapatista National Liberation Army.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peace commissioners, governors and even the president of this nation have all been replaced in the 11 months since the last round of peace talks between the government and the Zapatista National Liberation Army. Thursday, as new negotiations appeared increasingly likely, the only major players who remain from a year ago are the angry Mayan Indian rebels and Samuel Ruiz, the indefatigable bishop of San Cristobal de las Casas.
OPINION
May 10, 1998 | Sergio Munoz, Sergio Munoz is an editorial writer for The Times
Some call him the "red bishop." Others call him "Tatic," which means "Father" in an Indian language. Both names fit Samuel Ruiz, the bishop of San Cristobal de las Casas in Chiapas. But he is far more than that: He's been ambushed, blessed, threatened, revered and criticized for his role in the dialogue for peace in Chiapas. Since the Jan.
OPINION
May 10, 1998 | Sergio Munoz, Sergio Munoz is an editorial writer for The Times
Some call him the "red bishop." Others call him "Tatic," which means "Father" in an Indian language. Both names fit Samuel Ruiz, the bishop of San Cristobal de las Casas in Chiapas. But he is far more than that: He's been ambushed, blessed, threatened, revered and criticized for his role in the dialogue for peace in Chiapas. Since the Jan.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peace commissioners, governors and even the president of this nation have all been replaced in the 11 months since the last round of peace talks between the government and the Zapatista National Liberation Army. Thursday, as new negotiations appeared increasingly likely, the only major players who remain from a year ago are the angry Mayan Indian rebels and Samuel Ruiz, the indefatigable bishop of San Cristobal de las Casas.
NEWS
January 14, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government and Indian rebel leaders in Chiapas on Friday were arranging an imminent face-to-face meeting between top officials and the Zapatista National Liberation Army after the rebels and their political backers offered concessions for peace.
NEWS
January 14, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government and Indian rebel leaders in Chiapas on Friday were arranging an imminent face-to-face meeting between top officials and the Zapatista National Liberation Army after the rebels and their political backers offered concessions for peace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1995 | From Religion News Service
Encouraged by what he called "signs of hope," Roman Catholic Bishop Samuel Ruiz called off his 15-day fast this week after the Mexican government agreed to negotiate with the rebel Zapatista Army that is waging war in the Mexican state of Chiapas. The peasant uprising began a year ago--on New Year's Day, 1994--when the rebel Zapatista Army of National Liberation declared war on the Mexican government, seeking political revolution, land reform and broader human rights.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a Christmas Eve announcement that analysts called a potential breakthrough toward a peaceful settlement to the conflict in Chiapas, President Ernesto Zedillo's government made a major concession Saturday to the rebels in Mexico's southernmost state, the Zapatista National Liberation Army.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
For 40 years as a bishop in Mexico's impoverished Chiapas state, Samuel Ruiz championed the rights of the long-suffering Maya Indians who dominate the lush region. He learned their languages and adopted their customs into Roman Catholic practice. He also made powerful enemies among rich landowners, Mexican governments and even the Vatican. He mediated the Zapatista peasant revolt of the 1990s and was both praised for helping to avoid wider bloodshed and criticized for supposedly inciting the rebels in the first place.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A faint hope for peace Sunday has once again placed Samuel Ruiz, the outspoken bishop of this embattled diocese, at the center of a conflict over indigenous rights just as the Mexican government seeks to blame Roman Catholic priests for last week's peasant uprising. Ruiz was asked to mediate in the armed insurrection by a group claiming to represent rebels of the Zapatista National Liberation Army.
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