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San Andreas Fault

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
The geothermal power plants at Southern California's Salton Sea don't just produce electricity, they also trigger thousands of temblors not far from one of the West Coast's most dangerous earthquake faults, a new study says. Research published online Thursday in the journal Science found that as production rose at the Imperial County geothermal field, so did the number of earthquakes. From 1981 through 2012, more than 10,000 earthquakes above magnitude 1.75 were recorded in the area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The cluster of earthquakes that began Friday night in La Habra appear to have struck on a fault underneath the Puente Hills thrust fault, scientists said Wednesday. Friday's earthquake has not provoked earthquakes on either the main Puente Hills fault or the nearby Whittier fault. Friday's magnitude-5.1 quake “was relatively shallow and thus did not significantly perturb the parts of the Puente Hills thrust or the Whittier fault, where we expect a major earthquake to start,” said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buried beneath the tracts of desert-colored homes with shingled roofs, wide streets and big yards, rests the mighty San Andreas fault, a geological menace responsible for two of the greatest earthquakes in California history. For Karmen Garcia and her two dogs, Dino and Sparky, this is home. "You can't see it here, but I know it's there," said Garcia, 45, as she walked her dogs along Bayberry Street. I think about it every day." Garcia laughed at the irony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | Steve Lopez
I'm generally not an alarmist about earthquakes. As a California native, I've experienced my share of small to moderate reminders that our fair state is fractured from head to toe and we're all standing on broken plates. But the shaking is putting me on edge lately. I find myself wondering if I should buy earthquake insurance, or why my dog is cocking his head as if he knows something I don't. This is partly because there's been more rocking and rolling than usual, and partly because of what we're learning about how shamefully unprepared we are for a Big One. And now I have more cause for concern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
Under the central part of the San Andreas fault, the deep seismic whisperings known as tremors have increased after two recent large earthquakes, and a surge in tremors appears to have foreshadowed one of them, according to a study to be published today in the journal Science. "It reaffirms the need to be ready," said Robert Nadeau, a research seismologist at UC Berkeley who led the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2001
The U.S. Geological Survey has recorded a series of small aftershocks southeast of Hollister in the aftermath of a 4.7-magnitude earthquake Friday on the San Andreas fault. A 3.0 aftershock struck about 7:15 a.m. Sunday, the Geological Survey's Menlo Park office reported. No damage was reported in the rural area, officials said. Sunday's aftershock followed a series of gentle jolts Saturday, including a 3.7 shaker--all aftershocks to a 4.
NEWS
October 7, 1997
Scientists increased their watch along the San Andreas fault near Parkfield in Central California Monday after a 3.5 earthquake occurred in a particularly sensitive zone where a magnitude 6 quake has been predicted since 1985. Bill Ellsworth of the U.S. Geological Survey said the quake at 4:28 p.m. Sunday was centered on the San Andreas fault under Middle Mountain, seven miles northwest of Parkfield. The predicted strong temblor under the mountain is at least four years overdue.
SCIENCE
June 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
New earthquake research confirms the southern end of the San Andreas fault near Los Angeles is overdue for a Big One, according to an analysis published in the current issue of the journal Nature. The lower section of the fault has not produced a major earthquake in more than three centuries.
NEWS
March 7, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer and
For years, geological evidence has suggested that large earthquake systems, such as California's San Andreas Fault, are driven by powerful forces that are held in check only by friction along the fault that is nearly as strong as the forces themselves. Textbooks used to train generations of earth scientists have stressed that concept, and most geologists today have had little reason to doubt it. But now it appears that the textbooks probably are wrong.
NEWS
September 25, 1985 | DAVID SMOLLAR
The geological forces along the Pacific Ocean floor that were responsible for last Thursday's massive earthquake in Mexico are different from those at work in California along the San Andreas fault. And, scientists say, the occurrence of the Mexican quake, involving a different section of the Earth's crust, has not increased or decreased the potential for quakes in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The Puente Hills fault, which scientists believe could be responsible for Friday's 5.1 earthquake in La Habra, is considered very dangerous. Here are some basic questions about the fault. Q: What would be the difference in shaking between a 5.1 quake and a truly huge quake? Friday night's earthquake was caused by the underground fault slipping for half a second, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Jones, prompting about 10 seconds of shaking at the surface. But a 7.5 quake on the Puente Hills fault could cause the fault to slip for 20 seconds - and the shaking could last far longer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude-5.1 earthquake that rattled Southern California on Friday was a 10-second reminder of a fault that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. The Puente Hills thrust fault is so dangerous because of its location, running from the suburbs of northern Orange County, though the San Gabriel Valley and under the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles before ending in Hollywood. Experts say a major 7.5-magnitude earthquake on the fault could do more damage to the heart of Los Angeles than the dreaded Big One on the San Andreas fault, which is located on the outskirts of metropolitan Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 5.1 earthquake that rattled Southern California on Friday was a 10-second reminder of a fault that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. The Puente Hills thrust fault is so dangerous because of its location, running from the suburbs of northern Orange County, through the San Gabriel Valley and under the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles before ending in Hollywood. Experts say a major, magnitude 7.5 earthquake on the fault could do more damage to the heart of Los Angeles than the dreaded Big One on the San Andreas fault, which is on the outskirts of metropolitan Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
Tom Heaton was sitting in his kitchen in Pasadena on Monday morning when an alert went off on his laptop warning him that an earthquake had struck about 40 miles away in Encino. Seconds later, he felt the shaking. "It was fantastic," said Heaton, director of Caltech's Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory. "It was bam bam, then it shook. It was probably about three seconds" between the alert and the shaking. Within a few years, all Californians should have access to those kinds of warnings, a crucial few seconds that could give emergency officials and residents time to brace for a major temblor.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
If a sculptor is going to make paintings, then ceramics seem to be the way to go. That, at least, is the loopy lesson from Liz Larner's eccentrically engaging exhibition of recent work at Regen Projects. The show also includes more traditional freestanding sculptures, including a large, highly polished “X” of cast stainless steel that seems poised to leap into the air like a giant, agitated water bug. Nearby, a billowy black form looks like the tail of a leaping whale paired with its mirror reflection in water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
Twenty years after the Northridge earthquake, experts say a huge temblor across Southern California today could cripple cellphone and Wi-Fi Internet service. Seismic safety officials increasingly have been studying how telecommunications would be affected after a quake even bigger than Northridge and expressed concerns it would make communications difficult for days or longer. Like water and gas lines, most Southern California Internet lines run across the San Andreas Fault, and officials fear the Big One could cut off service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1994 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parkfield, the Central California hamlet on the San Andreas Fault where scientists have deployed an elaborate network of seismological instruments since 1985, had a 5.0 temblor early Tuesday, but scientists did not view it as a likely precursor of a larger quake. The moderately strong 2:28 a.m. jolt was centered three miles west of Parkfield and was felt in a wide area, including Paso Robles and San Luis Obispo, causing only a few minor rockfalls that did no damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The developers of the Ritter Ranch master-planned community say they have found the ideal site for a high school within their 10,625-acre project in west Palmdale. It's in a relatively remote area, so noise generated by students won't bother homeowners, officials said, adding that the view is spectacular and the developer is willing to donate the 50 acres to the Antelope Valley Union High School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
In the 20 years since the Northridge earthquake, the state's freeway bridges have been strengthened. A new generation of hospitals, schools and university buildings designed to better withstand a massive quake has risen. But for all those strides, changes in society and technology have left California vulnerable in other ways. The 1994 Northridge disaster occurred in an era before Wi-Fi computer access and at a time when cellphones were still something of a rarity. Seismic safety experts say that if a huge quake strikes the state now, both services would be interrupted - possibly for days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
The geothermal power plants at Southern California's Salton Sea don't just produce electricity, they also trigger thousands of temblors not far from one of the West Coast's most dangerous earthquake faults, a new study says. Research published online Thursday in the journal Science found that as production rose at the Imperial County geothermal field, so did the number of earthquakes. From 1981 through 2012, more than 10,000 earthquakes above magnitude 1.75 were recorded in the area.
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