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San Antonio Creek

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | NICK GREEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A federal agency has derailed the county's attempt to perform emergency flood-control work on San Antonio Creek, saying more study is needed before the proposed $1.15-million project could go forward. Wednesday's decision by the Army Corps of Engineers will indefinitely delay the work, which the county says is necessary to safeguard Casitas Springs residents and their property near the Ventura River tributary.
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NATIONAL
July 3, 2002 | From Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO -- Torrential rain drenched central Texas for a fourth straight day Tuesday, flooding homes and blocking highways. One man died and another was missing after they were swept away in flood waters. Gov. Rick Perry activated the Texas National Guard to help with relief efforts. Rescue teams used rafts, personal watercraft and helicopters to rescue people from stranded vehicles and flooded homes. The storm has dumped more than 15 inches of rain in some areas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996
Regarding all the furor that is going on about the flood control situation along San Antonio Creek, I am curious to know why the people who are living down by the creek moved there in the first place. Surely they must have known or been informed of the possibility of violent flooding. This has happened on occasion for a least the past 100 years. I am sorry that these people are so misinformed but I, for one, am not going to allow my tax money to continue to destroy any more natural environmental areas that man continues to indulge in simply because that is what he wants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996
Regarding all the furor that is going on about the flood control situation along San Antonio Creek, I am curious to know why the people who are living down by the creek moved there in the first place. Surely they must have known or been informed of the possibility of violent flooding. This has happened on occasion for a least the past 100 years. I am sorry that these people are so misinformed but I, for one, am not going to allow my tax money to continue to destroy any more natural environmental areas that man continues to indulge in simply because that is what he wants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1995
The emergency flood control project on San Antonio Creek needs to be kept in perspective and not clouded by the coordinated dissemination of misinformation by alleged environmentalists. The floods of January and March destroyed one home and damaged many others. Fortunately, no lives were lost. But the present condition of the creek is dangerous, and even a five-year flood could destroy homes. It's time to act now so that no one is killed. Highway 33 between Old Creek Road and Creek Road is also at risk.
NATIONAL
July 3, 2002 | From Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO -- Torrential rain drenched central Texas for a fourth straight day Tuesday, flooding homes and blocking highways. One man died and another was missing after they were swept away in flood waters. Gov. Rick Perry activated the Texas National Guard to help with relief efforts. Rescue teams used rafts, personal watercraft and helicopters to rescue people from stranded vehicles and flooded homes. The storm has dumped more than 15 inches of rain in some areas.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
The expected massive weather front stormed ashore the length of California Friday, paralyzing traffic, flooding highways, knocking out power, setting off mud slides and intensifying fear in canyons and on soggy hillsides denuded by last summer's disastrous brushfires. In the Ojai area of Ventura County, rain pounded down at the rate of nearly one inch an hour, turning streams into roaring rivers and forcing the evacuation of homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1995 | ERIC WAHLGREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite environmentalists' concerns that enlarging San Antonio Creek will harm the waterway's ecosystem, county leaders on Tuesday approved a $1.2-million flood control project that Casitas Springs residents say is needed to protect their homes from approaching winter storms. The plan calls for removing sediment and widening the creek along a 2 1/4-mile stretch surrounded by 30 homes between the Ventura River and Fraser Lane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
Two environmental groups have filed a lawsuit against Ventura County, charging that a flood-control project to widen part of San Antonio Creek in Casitas Springs would kill vegetation and harm steelhead trout. Attorneys for Friends of the Ventura River and California Trout Inc., a conservationist group, filed a lawsuit this month against Ventura County, the Board of Supervisors and the Ventura County Flood Control District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The search has been called off for an 11-year-old Huntington Park boy who was swept away Sunday by fast-moving San Antonio Creek below Mt. Baldy, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Sgt. Paul Patterson said Friday. Searchers will wait until water levels recede to resume looking for Marcelo Bautista, who was the first of three people swept away this week by the creek in the San Gabriel Mountains. The bodies of the other two, a 35-year-old woman and her 7-year-old son, were recovered Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | NICK GREEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A federal agency has derailed the county's attempt to perform emergency flood-control work on San Antonio Creek, saying more study is needed before the proposed $1.15-million project could go forward. Wednesday's decision by the Army Corps of Engineers will indefinitely delay the work, which the county says is necessary to safeguard Casitas Springs residents and their property near the Ventura River tributary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1995
The emergency flood control project on San Antonio Creek needs to be kept in perspective and not clouded by the coordinated dissemination of misinformation by alleged environmentalists. The floods of January and March destroyed one home and damaged many others. Fortunately, no lives were lost. But the present condition of the creek is dangerous, and even a five-year flood could destroy homes. It's time to act now so that no one is killed. Highway 33 between Old Creek Road and Creek Road is also at risk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1995 | ERIC WAHLGREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite environmentalists' concerns that enlarging San Antonio Creek will harm the waterway's ecosystem, county leaders on Tuesday approved a $1.2-million flood control project that Casitas Springs residents say is needed to protect their homes from approaching winter storms. The plan calls for removing sediment and widening the creek along a 2 1/4-mile stretch surrounded by 30 homes between the Ventura River and Fraser Lane.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
The expected massive weather front stormed ashore the length of California Friday, paralyzing traffic, flooding highways, knocking out power, setting off mud slides and intensifying fear in canyons and on soggy hillsides denuded by last summer's disastrous brushfires. In the Ojai area of Ventura County, rain pounded down at the rate of nearly one inch an hour, turning streams into roaring rivers and forcing the evacuation of homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1990 | SCOTT LAWRENCE
Reconstruction art done by the Ventura County Sheriff Department's crime laboratory of a skull found in Oak Park in July cannot give a positive identification of the body, Assistant Medical Examiner Ronald L. O'Halloran said. The work was done in an attempt to reconstruct the appearance of the skull and possibly link it to Jeanetta LaBelle, who is believed to have drowned in San Antonio Creek during a flood in 1969. "A drawing can't be good enough," O'Halloran said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports.
Supervisors promised to find ways to prevent permanent closing of Lompoc-Casmalia Road, the first in the nation to be declared a habitat for an endangered species of fish. The road, which stretches from the main entrance of Vandenberg Air Force Base to the community of Casmalia, repeatedly floods where it crosses San Antonio Creek. It was declared a habitat for the unarmored three-spine stickleback fish after 1995 floodwaters wiped out a bridge.
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