Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Antonio Museum Of Art
IN THE NEWS

San Antonio Museum Of Art

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1988 | JUDITH MICHAELSON and DAVID CROOK, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Dallas beat out San Antonio in a Texas-sized duel for the right to hold an exhibition featuring artifacts of the Egytpian pharaoh Ramses II. Cairo's archeological circles dubbed it the second "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral." Each city was armed with what it considered a valid letter-of-intent signed by Egyptian officials promising the popular exhibit of the pharoah who ruled Egypt 3,200 years ago.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
TRAVEL
September 28, 1997
San Antonio next month will unveil a monumental outdoor mural by Latino artist Jesse Trevin~o, a public emblem of the Texas city's growing importance as a center of Latino arts and culture. Next year, in the fall, the San Antonio Museum of Art expects to open an $11-million, 30,000-square-foot-wing to showcase what is one of the most comprehensive Latin American folk art collections in the U.S. Next month, Oct. 17 through Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1998 | CARY CARDWELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 70 years, the portrait of a bricklayer by one of Mexico's premier artists, Diego Rivera, gathered dust, hanging undisturbed and unrecognized behind a bedroom door in the home of a prominent local family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Esperanza Martinez, Latina artist who overcame sex discrimination to place her vibrant, sweeping, Diego Rivera-inspired paintings in museums and collections around the world, has died. She was 64. Martinez, who moved from Mexico to Southern California in 1963, died Wednesday in Hacienda Heights of breast cancer. When she was 3, her grandfather gave her a pencil and paper and told her to draw.
MAGAZINE
October 31, 1993 | EMILY YOUNG
When it comes to modern Latin American art, there are the celebrated paintings by artists such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, and then there is the contemporary art that embraces ordinary items decorated not for gallery walls but for day-to-day living.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
The Autry National Center -- formed two years ago by a merger of the Museum of the American West (formerly the Autry Museum of Western Heritage) and the Southwest Museum of the American Indian -- has selected Overland Partners Architects to develop a master plan and design a greatly expanded facility for its 10-acre campus in Griffith Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1989 | GERARD GARZA, San Diego County Arts Editor
If your exposure to Mexican folk art has been an occasional visit to tourist-oriented shops across the border, the Mathes Cultural Center in Escondido offers an opportunity to broaden your horizons. Friday, the center opens an exhibit with the unwieldy, albeit descriptive, title of "Folk Art: Four Extraordinary Private Collections and Devotional Objects From the San Antonio Museum of Art."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
The first major historical survey of American black art to be organized in a decade arrives at the California Afro-American Museum Thursday and continues through June 2. "Hidden Heritage: Afro-American Art, 1800-1950" was organized by guest curator David C. Driskell for the Bellevue Art Museum and the Art Museum Assn. of America under the sponsorship of Phillip Morris Inc. The show contains 84 paintings, drawings and sculptures by 42 artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Kevin E. Consey, director of the Newport Harbor Art Museum in Newport Beach, has been named to head the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, it was announced Friday. Consey will assume the new post Nov. 15. The Newport museum is in the midst of a $50-million capital campaign to establish an endowment and to build a new facility. Consey's replacement will be the museum's fourth director in a decade. A search committee has been named and will begin work immediately, according to Thomas H.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
"I want Chicano art to go through the front doors of museums with banners waving and trumpets blaring," actor Cheech Marin said the other day in an ardent discourse on the art he loves and collects. "Chicano art should be recognized as a school of American art. It's one of the main threads of the cultural fabric of this country."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|