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San Bernardino County Agriculture

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1990
The state Department of Food and Agriculture will conduct aerial spraying of malathion tonight beginning at 9 p.m., weather permitting. Area: 34 square miles encompassing Del Rosa, northeastern San Bernardino and northern Highland; 19 square miles including parts of Riverside, Arnold Heights, Woodcrest and March Air Force Base. Precautions: Stay indoors; keep animals indoors; wash animal dishes and toys left outside; cover cars; keep doors and windows closed.
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NEWS
November 24, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The decision not to begin malathion spraying in San Bernardino County, despite the discovery of two Mediterranean fruit flies there earlier this month, is a potentially risky move that bends established guidelines on eradication of the pest, agriculture officials said Friday. "There's risk in anything, but I don't think it's that risky," said Roy Cunningham, a USDA entomologist and chairman of the state's science advisory panel on the Medfly. "We can't jump the gun on this thing."
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NEWS
April 21, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Agriculture officials announced the discovery of two Mediterranean fruit flies--one in the city of Cerritos and the other in the San Bernardino County community of Rancho Cucamonga. The Cerritos fly was trapped Thursday in a fig tree about an eighth of a mile outside a treatment area. The Medfly in Rancho Cucamonga was found in a grapefruit tree, also just outside a malathion treatment area. Both flies were identified as immature females.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two weeks after the state jubilantly declared the eradication of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Southern California, agriculture officials announced Wednesday the discovery of two more of the crop-destroying pests--this time in San Bernardino County. The two unmated female Medflies were found within three miles of each other in Upland and Rancho Cucamonga. One of the trapped flies was less than a mile from where the first Medfly ever found in the county was trapped last September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1990
Malathion spray zones in Downey, Pomona and Upland will be expanded by 42 square miles to fight new Mediterranean fruit fly outbreaks, widening Southern California's aerial pesticide campaign to about 480 square miles, state agriculture officials said Tuesday. The expanded sectors will be sprayed two times, followed by the release of sterile Medflies. Seven Medflies were found last week, most just outside existing spray zones.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two weeks after the state jubilantly declared the eradication of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Southern California, agriculture officials announced Wednesday the discovery of two more of the crop-destroying pests--this time in San Bernardino County. The two unmated female Medflies were found within three miles of each other in Upland and Rancho Cucamonga. One of the trapped flies was less than a mile from where the first Medfly ever found in the county was trapped last September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1990
The California Department of Food and Agriculture will conduct aerial spraying of malathion tonight beginning at 9 p.m., weather permitting. Area: 14 square miles encompassing Echo Park, Silver Lake, Chinatown, parts of Koreatown and downtown's Bunker Hill and Skid Row. Dodger Stadium is exempted from the spraying. In San Bernardino County, 34 square miles will be sprayed, encompassing Del Rosa, northeastern San Bernardino and northern Highland.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Bernardino joined the battle to stop aerial malathion spraying Wednesday by filing a lawsuit against the state claiming that the controversial campaign would endanger a host of threatened animals in the city's undeveloped foothills. City Atty. James F. Penman said at least seven protected animals and plants, including the orange throat whiptail lizard and the Western yellow-tailed cuckoo, could be harmed if the state goes through with its plan to begin malathion spraying Friday night.
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