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San Bernardino County Health

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mirroring progress that has been seen across California, San Bernardino County health officials announced Monday that a four-year campaign to tackle alarmingly high rates of infant mortality and improve children's health has been a marked success. The worst problem had been in two urban neighborhoods in the city of San Bernardino that are home to 66,000 people and troubled by poverty, low education and poor prenatal care.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mirroring progress that has been seen across California, San Bernardino County health officials announced Monday that a four-year campaign to tackle alarmingly high rates of infant mortality and improve children's health has been a marked success. The worst problem had been in two urban neighborhoods in the city of San Bernardino that are home to 66,000 people and troubled by poverty, low education and poor prenatal care.
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NEWS
June 26, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal technicians were doing lab work Wednesday to determine if hantavirus killed a woman who had cleaned up a mountain cabin she planned to buy. Results were expected this week, said Mark Lohman, spokesman for the Riverside County coroner. Donna Lynch, 44, of Hemet died at a hospital in her hometown Friday just hours after coming down with a cough and vomiting.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | Associated Press
Laboratory tests have determined that something other than hantavirus killed a Hemet woman who died after cleaning a mountain cabin, authorities said Thursday. Blood tests on the body of Donna Lynch, 44, proved negative for the virus, authorities said. An autopsy was planned for Thursday night, said Mark Lohman, spokesman for the Riverside County coroner. Because the cause of Lynch's death was unclear, pathologists planned to wear airtight suits and take extra security precautions, he said.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A persistent measles epidemic that has gripped the Southland and other regions of California since late 1987 flared anew in January, claiming six lives and prompting some experts to warn that an end to the outbreak is nowhere in sight. The surge in measles cases comes after several counties experienced a lull late last year that gave many health officials hope that the stubborn epidemic might be subsiding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The measles epidemic that has plagued Southern California since late 1987 has dramatically worsened, with Los Angeles County and the Inland Empire, the hardest-hit areas, reporting many more cases during the first three months of 1990 than in all of 1989. Dramatic increases in measles cases have also been registered throughout the Central Valley and in San Diego County, and a measles outbreak has developed in Alameda County in the San Francisco Bay Area.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the differences between the cities of Fontana and Rancho Cucamonga--one is an old blue-collar steel town, the other a more up-scale white-collar community--researchers are wondering which ones may prove the difference between life and death. A benchmark study released today shows that residents of San Bernardino County are more likely than residents of any other county in California to die of cardiovascular diseases.
NEWS
November 9, 1988
A San Bernardino County man was partially paralyzed by encephalitis, contracted in an area where the virus was detected in test chickens earlier in the year, county health officials said. They declined to identify the 69-year-old victim. The man entered a hospital in late September and lapsed into a coma for a short time before regaining consciousness, officials said. He suffered partial paralysis on one side but recovered enough to leave the hospital Oct. 19.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
A stubborn measles outbreak that has plagued much of Southern California for two years has flared this summer in the Inland Empire, causing two deaths and prompting concern that the disease could spread still faster with the start of the school year next month. Hardest hit by the rubeola, or "10-day measles," epidemic has been San Bernardino County, where more than 500 cases have been reported since October.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | Associated Press
Laboratory tests have determined that something other than hantavirus killed a Hemet woman who died after cleaning a mountain cabin, authorities said Thursday. Blood tests on the body of Donna Lynch, 44, proved negative for the virus, authorities said. An autopsy was planned for Thursday night, said Mark Lohman, spokesman for the Riverside County coroner. Because the cause of Lynch's death was unclear, pathologists planned to wear airtight suits and take extra security precautions, he said.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal technicians were doing lab work Wednesday to determine if hantavirus killed a woman who had cleaned up a mountain cabin she planned to buy. Results were expected this week, said Mark Lohman, spokesman for the Riverside County coroner. Donna Lynch, 44, of Hemet died at a hospital in her hometown Friday just hours after coming down with a cough and vomiting.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the differences between the cities of Fontana and Rancho Cucamonga--one is an old blue-collar steel town, the other a more up-scale white-collar community--researchers are wondering which ones may prove the difference between life and death. A benchmark study released today shows that residents of San Bernardino County are more likely than residents of any other county in California to die of cardiovascular diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The measles epidemic that has plagued Southern California since late 1987 has dramatically worsened, with Los Angeles County and the Inland Empire, the hardest-hit areas, reporting many more cases during the first three months of 1990 than in all of 1989. Dramatic increases in measles cases have also been registered throughout the Central Valley and in San Diego County, and a measles outbreak has developed in Alameda County in the San Francisco Bay Area.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A persistent measles epidemic that has gripped the Southland and other regions of California since late 1987 flared anew in January, claiming six lives and prompting some experts to warn that an end to the outbreak is nowhere in sight. The surge in measles cases comes after several counties experienced a lull late last year that gave many health officials hope that the stubborn epidemic might be subsiding.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
A stubborn measles outbreak that has plagued much of Southern California for two years has flared this summer in the Inland Empire, causing two deaths and prompting concern that the disease could spread still faster with the start of the school year next month. Hardest hit by the rubeola, or "10-day measles," epidemic has been San Bernardino County, where more than 500 cases have been reported since October.
NEWS
November 9, 1988
A San Bernardino County man was partially paralyzed by encephalitis, contracted in an area where the virus was detected in test chickens earlier in the year, county health officials said. They declined to identify the 69-year-old victim. The man entered a hospital in late September and lapsed into a coma for a short time before regaining consciousness, officials said. He suffered partial paralysis on one side but recovered enough to leave the hospital Oct. 19.
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