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San Bernardino County Population

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NEWS
December 19, 1988 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Urban Affairs Writer
In San Bernardino County, environmentalists and developers, who have been at each other's throats elsewhere, have agreed on a countywide growth management plan that could lead to developer fees of $5,000 to $10,000 for each new housing unit. The president of the local chapter of the Building Industry Assn.
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NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's long-predicted new ethnic order became reality in the 1990s, as Latinos ascended to dominance in Los Angeles and nonwhites came to outnumber whites regionwide by more than 3 million, census data released Thursday showed. As the millennium dawned, the combined population of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties hit 16,373,645--surpassing the statewide total in 1960 and topping all other states in 2000 except Texas and New York.
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NEWS
April 23, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 30 years a phantom freeway--California 30--has appeared on maps and plans in San Bernardino County, but not until now has it seemed a real possibility.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 30 years a phantom freeway--California 30--has appeared on maps and plans in San Bernardino County, but not until now has it seemed a real possibility.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's long-predicted new ethnic order became reality in the 1990s, as Latinos ascended to dominance in Los Angeles and nonwhites came to outnumber whites regionwide by more than 3 million, census data released Thursday showed. As the millennium dawned, the combined population of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties hit 16,373,645--surpassing the statewide total in 1960 and topping all other states in 2000 except Texas and New York.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Palmdale, once better known for its rattlesnakes and tumbleweeds than for economic development, has displaced Irvine as the fastest-growing city in California, according to study released today by the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Urban Affairs Writer
California's Inland Empire, made up of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, is the fastest-growing large metropolitan area in the country, according to report released Thursday by the U.S Census Bureau. With a growth rate of 46.2% in the 1980s, the population explosion in Riverside-San Bernardino will help ensure that the five-county area surrounding the city of Los Angeles will have experienced more growth in terms of sheer numbers of people, 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2004 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
During San Bernardino County's budget hearings Wednesday, the usual instructions to cut costs, increase fees and implement layoffs to absorb another big cut in state funding were interrupted by a demand from county supervisors to increase the staff in one segment of government. The supervisors ordered the agencies that oversee construction and development to add staff -- even if it means hiring private contractors.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California last year grew at the slowest pace in nearly two decades as the state's stagnant economy discouraged people from moving into the state and prompted others to leave in search of a better life elsewhere, the Wilson Administration said Wednesday. The state's population grew by 570,000, to 31.5 million people, during 1992, according to the latest survey by the Department of Finance. That was a growth rate of just 1.8%, the lowest since 1975.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2005 | Ashley Powers and Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writers
The dust-up in Muscoy began on a December night last year, when a newly elected county supervisor came to talk about cleaning up ratty neighborhoods and luring businesses. Linda Thacker pictured her avocado orchard being razed to make way for another wave of red-tile roofs and latte drinkers. She had roosted in this small, unincorporated pocket near Cal State San Bernardino much of her life, and preferred living next door to chickens and goats.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Urban Affairs Writer
California's Inland Empire, made up of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, is the fastest-growing large metropolitan area in the country, according to report released Thursday by the U.S Census Bureau. With a growth rate of 46.2% in the 1980s, the population explosion in Riverside-San Bernardino will help ensure that the five-county area surrounding the city of Los Angeles will have experienced more growth in terms of sheer numbers of people, 2.
NEWS
December 19, 1988 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Urban Affairs Writer
In San Bernardino County, environmentalists and developers, who have been at each other's throats elsewhere, have agreed on a countywide growth management plan that could lead to developer fees of $5,000 to $10,000 for each new housing unit. The president of the local chapter of the Building Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Palmdale, once better known for its rattlesnakes and tumbleweeds than for economic development, has displaced Irvine as the fastest-growing city in California, according to study released today by the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There will be no pink underwear. Late last year, officers from San Bernardino County's Central Juvenile Hall, the state's most crowded youth jail, took a trip to Arizona. About to become the first in California to house juvenile inmates in military-style tents, they arrived in Maricopa County, Ariz., where Sheriff Joe Arpaio runs famously unpleasant jails, forcing inmates to wear pink underwear, eat green bologna and live in tents that outrage civil rights activists.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California last year grew at the slowest pace in nearly two decades as the state's stagnant economy discouraged people from moving into the state and prompted others to leave in search of a better life, the Wilson Administration said Wednesday. The state's population grew by 570,000 to 31.5 million people during 1992, according to the latest survey by the Department of Finance. That was a growth rate of just 1.8%, the lowest increase since 1975. Orange County's growth rate of 2.
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