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San Bernardino County Zoning

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BUSINESS
August 15, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A horse is a horse, of course. Of course? Not quite, says Yucca Valley breeder James K. Walker Jr. He owns three horses, which he says the breeding industry defines precisely as male animals at least five years old and 58 inches high at the base of the neck. The rest of the 29-animal herd at Clover J Arabians, he insists, consists of equines called mares, colts, fillies, geldings and foals. Horsefeathers, say San Bernardino County officials.
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BUSINESS
August 15, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A horse is a horse, of course. Of course? Not quite, says Yucca Valley breeder James K. Walker Jr. He owns three horses, which he says the breeding industry defines precisely as male animals at least five years old and 58 inches high at the base of the neck. The rest of the 29-animal herd at Clover J Arabians, he insists, consists of equines called mares, colts, fillies, geldings and foals. Horsefeathers, say San Bernardino County officials.
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NEWS
February 8, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court, restricting the placement of billboards along California highways, ruled Thursday that outdoor advertising signs may only be placed on land zoned primarily for commercial or industrial use. The unanimous decision was a major victory for state transportation officials, who had warned that allowing billboards on mainly residential or agricultural lands could lead to a proliferation of such signs, particularly in sparsely populated areas.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court, restricting the placement of billboards along California highways, ruled Thursday that outdoor advertising signs may only be placed on land zoned primarily for commercial or industrial use. The unanimous decision was a major victory for state transportation officials, who had warned that allowing billboards on mainly residential or agricultural lands could lead to a proliferation of such signs, particularly in sparsely populated areas.
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