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San Clemente Ca Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1999 | Jason Leopold, (714) 966-5634
City officials are in the process of adopting a budget for the coming year. Council members attended a two-day workshop recently and said the long-term financial plan will focus on economic development, financial planning and management infrastructure, community and customer service, and organizational development and quality of life. The proposed budget and projects relating to these priorities will be presented at a future City Council meeting, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2000 | Matt Kieta, (949) 248-2158
Last week, the City Council approved the city's $123-million budget for the 2000-01 fiscal year. The council approved a transfer of $1.25 million from the general fund to the golf course capital reserve fund to help pay for the construction of a new clubhouse at the San Clemente Municipal Golf Course. It also approved a $2 weekday and $3 weekend greens fee increase to help finance the rest of the $3.2-million project and assorted other improvements to the course.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
The City Council tonight will consider approving a leaner 1997-1998 budget, made necessary by the defeat of a tax on utility bills earlier this month. City officials drew up two budgets in February, after they found themselves with a $2.8-million shortfall when Proposition 218 outlawed the city's lighting and landscaping taxing district. The city's so-called "green budget" cut $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
The cash-strapped city could save $500,000 under a 1997-98 budget amendment expected to be approved tonight by the City Council. Council members have decided to use city employees to perform park, beach and public works maintenance duties instead of hiring outside contractors as originally planned in the city's $21-million general fund budget. The council approved the budget in June after grappling with a $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
City residents will vote today on a proposed 2.5% tax on utility bills. The tax on electric, gas, water, sewer and basic cable TV bills would offset a $1-million shortfall created by Prop. 218, the statewide measure passed last November. The City Council found itself $2.8 million short in the 1997-1998 budget after Prop. 218 outlawed the city's Lighting and Landscape District. Those assessments paid for park, beach, street light and traffic signal maintenance. The council cut $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
Despite pleas from some residents, the City Council passed a drastically reduced 1997-98 budget, prompted by this month's defeat of a utility tax. The city found itself with a $2.8-million budget shortfall when Proposition 218 effectively outlawed its lighting and landscaping taxing district. In February, the council held marathon meetings to draw up two alternative budgets: a "red budget" that eliminated $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
The city's long-term financial plan will be the focus of a special all-day meeting today, and the public is encouraged to attend. The City Council will meet at 8:30 a.m. in the council chambers to talk about tightening the budget and how to cope with Proposition 218, which limits cities in raising revenue. Officials estimate the city will lose as much as $2.8 million a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1997 | KIMBERLY SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's voters will decide in a special election June 3 whether to raise their utility tax by 2.5% to offset the revenue loss that resulted from the passage of Proposition 218. The City Council voted unanimously Wednesday night to put the issue on the June ballot. If it is approved, it would raise funds to make up part of a projected $2.8-million shortfall in the city's $21-million budget for fiscal 1997-98.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
The City Council breezed through the 1997-98 budget because most of the work had been done three months earlier. When Proposition 218 passed last fall, it created a $2.8-million shortfall in the city's $22.7-million budget by effectively outlawing the city's lighting and landscaping taxing district, which paid for beach, park and street-light maintenance. In February, the city staff drew up a budget saving $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1995 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
The City Council will hold a public workshop tonight to review its proposed $67.4-million budget, which includes $17.7 million for a program to repair city streets, sewers and parks. "It's the largest capital improvement project the city has entered into," said City Manager Mike Parness. The budget includes a proposal to create an assessment district to help fund repair of the worst streets in the city, such as parts of Avenida Presidio and Avenida Cabrillo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
Despite pleas from some residents, the City Council passed a drastically reduced 1997-98 budget, prompted by this month's defeat of a utility tax. The city found itself with a $2.8-million budget shortfall when Proposition 218 effectively outlawed its lighting and landscaping taxing district. In February, the council held marathon meetings to draw up two alternative budgets: a "red budget" that eliminated $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
The City Council tonight will consider approving a leaner 1997-1998 budget, made necessary by the defeat of a tax on utility bills earlier this month. City officials drew up two budgets in February, after they found themselves with a $2.8-million shortfall when Proposition 218 outlawed the city's lighting and landscaping taxing district. The city's so-called "green budget" cut $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
City residents will vote today on a proposed 2.5% tax on utility bills. The tax on electric, gas, water, sewer and basic cable TV bills would offset a $1-million shortfall created by Prop. 218, the statewide measure passed last November. The City Council found itself $2.8 million short in the 1997-1998 budget after Prop. 218 outlawed the city's Lighting and Landscape District. Those assessments paid for park, beach, street light and traffic signal maintenance. The council cut $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
The City Council breezed through the 1997-98 budget because most of the work had been done three months earlier. When Proposition 218 passed last fall, it created a $2.8-million shortfall in the city's $22.7-million budget by effectively outlawing the city's lighting and landscaping taxing district, which paid for beach, park and street-light maintenance. In February, the city staff drew up a budget saving $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1995
The city will begin its new fiscal year with a $67.4-million budget, including $17.7 million for the city's largest capital improvement project yet. City staffers said that after five years of downsizing, they finally have begun to address neglected projects. "We have gone through a significant period of cutting and reorganization and streamlining to maintain cost control," said City Manager Michael W. Parness, adding that for the first time in four years city employees will get a raise, of 3%.
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