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San Clemente Ca Finances

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1998 | ERIKA CHAVEZ
Closed for the last year, Richard T. Steed Memorial Park will reopen if the City Council approves a plan allowing an independent concessionaire to take over the park's operation. The park, named for the city's only police officer killed in the line of duty, was home to many youth and adult softball teams.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER
Residents along Avenida Calafia are fighting plans for parking meters on the street, saying they would be the ones forced to spend coins, not beach-goers. "I am not opposed to helping get the city out of debt, but it's not fair to tax residents who live here," resident Terry Lawrence said. The Planning Commission this week voted 4 to 2 to recommend an undetermined number of meters on Avenida Calafia and Camino Capistrano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
The cash-strapped city could save $500,000 under a 1997-98 budget amendment expected to be approved tonight by the City Council. Council members have decided to use city employees to perform park, beach and public works maintenance duties instead of hiring outside contractors as originally planned in the city's $21-million general fund budget. The council approved the budget in June after grappling with a $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
Despite pleas from some residents, the City Council passed a drastically reduced 1997-98 budget, prompted by this month's defeat of a utility tax. The city found itself with a $2.8-million budget shortfall when Proposition 218 effectively outlawed its lighting and landscaping taxing district. In February, the council held marathon meetings to draw up two alternative budgets: a "red budget" that eliminated $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
The City Council breezed through the 1997-98 budget because most of the work had been done three months earlier. When Proposition 218 passed last fall, it created a $2.8-million shortfall in the city's $22.7-million budget by effectively outlawing the city's lighting and landscaping taxing district, which paid for beach, park and street-light maintenance. In February, the city staff drew up a budget saving $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
Even though City Council members are skeptical about whether a coastal trail can be built along San Clemente's shoreline, they're spending $104,000 in grant money to find out. Proponents say the trail will stimulate beach-side business, encourage future commercial development and offer safe crossings over the railroad tracks that lie between the beach and Pacific Coast Highway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1997 | FRANK MESSINA
Leaders of the city's employee union say they will fight a plan by officials to save money by contracting out maintenance services and laying off the 23 employees who do that work now. The 100-member San Clemente City Employees Union has sent a letter asking for a meeting with city officials and has hired negotiators from the Orange County Employees Assn. to represent it, union officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1997 | FRANK MESSINA
The City Council on Wednesday laid off more than 20 city workers, among the first public employees in Orange County to lose their jobs as a result of the passage of Proposition 218. Seeking to make up a $2.8-million shortfall in the city's $21-million budget for fiscal 1997-98, the council also passed a sweeping package of cutbacks and fee increases. The council will ask voters to approve a 2.5% utility tax increase in June, which could raise about $1.2 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Budget cuts are the talk of the town as the City Council searches for answers to a $2.8-million shortfall that officials say was created by the passage of Proposition 218. With a marathon session last Saturday and meetings Tuesday and Wednesday nights, the council has heard public comment and held lengthy debates over where to trim costs.
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