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San Clemente Ca Taxes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The City Council recently approved the formation of a $6.5-million, special-tax district to finance public improvements in the Plaza Pacifica area. Projects to be financed will be general street improvements, new traffic signals, median landscaping, street lighting, water and sewer lines, a bicycle trail and storm drains. Improvements will be made to areas north of Avenida Pico, between Camino Vera Cruz and east of Avenida La Plata. Information: (949) 361-8200.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The City Council recently approved the formation of a $6.5-million, special-tax district to finance public improvements in the Plaza Pacifica area. Projects to be financed will be general street improvements, new traffic signals, median landscaping, street lighting, water and sewer lines, a bicycle trail and storm drains. Improvements will be made to areas north of Avenida Pico, between Camino Vera Cruz and east of Avenida La Plata. Information: (949) 361-8200.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
City residents will vote today on a proposed 2.5% tax on utility bills. The tax on electric, gas, water, sewer and basic cable TV bills would offset a $1-million shortfall created by Prop. 218, the statewide measure passed last November. The City Council found itself $2.8 million short in the 1997-1998 budget after Prop. 218 outlawed the city's Lighting and Landscape District. Those assessments paid for park, beach, street light and traffic signal maintenance. The council cut $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER
As an incentive to preserve and protect the city's heritage, City Council members have formalized an ordinance making owners of historical properties eligible for property tax reductions from 40% to 70%. The preservation ordinance, known statewide as the Mills Act, would cost the city about $60,000 a year if all 202 eligible historic property owners participate. The measure received preliminary approval last May when the list of properties was initially compiled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
Despite pleas from some residents, the City Council passed a drastically reduced 1997-98 budget, prompted by this month's defeat of a utility tax. The city found itself with a $2.8-million budget shortfall when Proposition 218 effectively outlawed its lighting and landscaping taxing district. In February, the council held marathon meetings to draw up two alternative budgets: a "red budget" that eliminated $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1997 | KIMBERLY SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's voters will decide in a special election June 3 whether to raise their utility tax by 2.5% to offset the revenue loss that resulted from the passage of Proposition 218. The City Council voted unanimously Wednesday night to put the issue on the June ballot. If it is approved, it would raise funds to make up part of a projected $2.8-million shortfall in the city's $21-million budget for fiscal 1997-98.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
In response to residents' concerns about increases in the fees for upkeep of parks, beaches and street lights, the City Council will form an advisory committee to study the need for such a levy. Under a new rate schedule approved by the council last month, the residential landscaping and lighting assessment rose nearly $7 a year to $93. It is the second time in two years that the assessment has been increased, prompting residents to oppose the hike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1995 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Residents soon will be receiving a newsletter from the city to end confusion about their property tax bills. The bills, which were sent out about two weeks ago, list an inaccurate description for the city's controversial new street assessment, which was created to pay for repairs of 60 miles of the worst roads in the city. The tax is listed as "Assessment District Bond #2," despite the fact that no bonds have been issued.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER
As an incentive to preserve and protect the city's heritage, City Council members have formalized an ordinance making owners of historical properties eligible for property tax reductions from 40% to 70%. The preservation ordinance, known statewide as the Mills Act, would cost the city about $60,000 a year if all 202 eligible historic property owners participate. The measure received preliminary approval last May when the list of properties was initially compiled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA
The City Council tonight will consider taxing property owners to help raise as much as $1.9 million annually for much-needed street repairs. It would be the second new fee considered by the city this year. The Street Overlay and Replacement District proposal would require owners of homes on public streets to pay fees of up to $130 annually. Those living on private streets would pay up to $33 annually, while commercial owners would pay about $283 per acre of property annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
Despite pleas from some residents, the City Council passed a drastically reduced 1997-98 budget, prompted by this month's defeat of a utility tax. The city found itself with a $2.8-million budget shortfall when Proposition 218 effectively outlawed its lighting and landscaping taxing district. In February, the council held marathon meetings to draw up two alternative budgets: a "red budget" that eliminated $2.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The cities lie at either end of the local landscape, but if the failed utility tax elections in San Clemente and Stanton are any indication, it may be a long time before voters choose to tax themselves in Orange County. The resounding defeats came despite dire warnings from local officials that public safety and park services would suffer in the wake of Proposition 218, which requires that any new taxes and those imposed since January 1995 be approved by a voter majority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
City residents will vote today on a proposed 2.5% tax on utility bills. The tax on electric, gas, water, sewer and basic cable TV bills would offset a $1-million shortfall created by Prop. 218, the statewide measure passed last November. The City Council found itself $2.8 million short in the 1997-1998 budget after Prop. 218 outlawed the city's Lighting and Landscape District. Those assessments paid for park, beach, street light and traffic signal maintenance. The council cut $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Proposition 218 passed in November, it eliminated San Clemente's lucrative taxing district for landscaping and lighting, which paid for beach, park and street-light maintenance. Because of a $1-million budget shortfall created by the mandates of Prop. 218, city officials have proposed a 2.5% utility tax, which goes before voters on Tuesday. The tax on electric, water, sewer, natural gas and basic cable TV service would drop to 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1997 | KIMBERLY SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's voters will decide in a special election June 3 whether to raise their utility tax by 2.5% to offset the revenue loss that resulted from the passage of Proposition 218. The City Council voted unanimously Wednesday night to put the issue on the June ballot. If it is approved, it would raise funds to make up part of a projected $2.8-million shortfall in the city's $21-million budget for fiscal 1997-98.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
In response to residents' concerns about increases in the fees for upkeep of parks, beaches and street lights, the City Council will form an advisory committee to study the need for such a levy. Under a new rate schedule approved by the council last month, the residential landscaping and lighting assessment rose nearly $7 a year to $93. It is the second time in two years that the assessment has been increased, prompting residents to oppose the hike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1991 | ZION BANKS
Faced with dwindling funds and aging infrastructure in the city, San Clemente officials will consider instituting a utility tax to raise money over the next 10 years when they meet for a workshop Monday. The city needs about $2 million to cover its workers' compensation, general liability and general reserve funds, said City Manager Michael W. Parness. He said the 1991-92 budget lists $900,000 just for the general reserve fund--about $1 million short of what is needed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN
Facing mounting liability from failing drainage pipes and deteriorating streets, the city has been advised that it can finance the repairs by imposing a 3% utility tax that would cost each household an average of $5.85 a month. This was part of the information presented by City Manager Michael W. Parness at a study session of the City Council that convened this week to address the city's financial woes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents who own historically designated homes are now eligible for property tax reductions from 40% to 70% under a preservation program approved last week by the City Council. In approving the plan, San Clemente became one of 30 cities in California now participating in the Mills Act, a state law which allows cities to offer property tax reductions to owners who preserve their historic homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1995 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Residents soon will be receiving a newsletter from the city to end confusion about their property tax bills. The bills, which were sent out about two weeks ago, list an inaccurate description for the city's controversial new street assessment, which was created to pay for repairs of 60 miles of the worst roads in the city. The tax is listed as "Assessment District Bond #2," despite the fact that no bonds have been issued.
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