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San Clemente General Hospital

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BUSINESS
January 24, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
A group that once was a dark horse in the competition among local physicians to buy San Clemente General Hospital said Monday that it has received tentative approval from a bankruptcy court to buy the facility for $23 million. The group, called PACE Inc. (Physician Associates Committed to Excellence), said a few issues must be resolved before a definitive agreement can be signed with American Healthcare Management, a Dallas-based hospital chain in bankruptcy.
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BUSINESS
June 2, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Tennessee company said Monday that it has acquired the only hospital in San Clemente in hopes of doubling the institution's business and making it profitable. NetCare Inc. purchased the money-losing 81-bed San Clemente Hospital and Medical Center after the hospital's previous operator--the hospital industry's troubled giant, Columbia/HCA Corp.--pulled out last month. Michael A. Koban Jr.
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BUSINESS
March 10, 1988 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
A group of doctors at San Clemente General Hospital said Wednesday that it plans to submit a rival, second proposal to buy the hospital from its current bankrupt owner, revealing a split of opinion among the hospital staff about how the hospital should be managed in the future.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1989 | Leslie Berkman, Times staff writer
The $23-million sale of San Clemente General Hospital to a group of staff doctors was completed Friday, more than a year after they launched a bid to buy the 116-bed general acute-care facility from a bankrupt hospital chain. In one of their first moves, the new owners changed the hospital's name to Samaritan Medical Center-San Clemente.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1989 | Leslie Berkman, Times staff writer
The $23-million sale of San Clemente General Hospital to a group of staff doctors was completed Friday, more than a year after they launched a bid to buy the 116-bed general acute-care facility from a bankrupt hospital chain. In one of their first moves, the new owners changed the hospital's name to Samaritan Medical Center-San Clemente.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1988 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
A physicians' group said Monday that it has withdrawn its bid to buy control of San Clemente General Hospital because a rival group of staff doctors undermined its efforts to obtain financing for the deal. Dr. Ron McGee, leader of the thwarted group, alleged Monday that doctors backing a competing plan to buy the hospital deliberately sent patients elsewhere to discourage financing for the acquisition. McGee said patient occupancy dropped from 50 to 17 in about a week's time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1989 | RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writer
In a manner befitting the celebrity her sex change operation brought more than 36 years ago, Christine Jorgensen requested that there be no memorial service after her death but rather a lavish party for her closest friends and relatives, her companion and roommate said Thursday. "It was show-biz as far as Chris was concerned," said Brenda Lana Smith, a former Danish honorary consul in Bermuda who lived with Jorgensen in a two-bedroom San Clemente apartment for the past 6 months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1989 | RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writer
Celebrity and fame come many ways, but with time, even the most notorious seem to fade from public view. It was never like that with Christine Jorgensen. She had one of those magic names that always seemed to trigger a reaction in people. And if you weren't quite sure who she was, you remembered as soon as someone told you. Jorgensen's fame was rooted in an intensely personal decision that shocked the world. In 1952, after a series of operations and hormonal treatments, then 24-year-old George Jorgensen Jr. walked out of a Danish medical clinic as Christine Jorgensen.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Christine Jorgensen, the one-time George Jorgensen who 36 1/2 years ago shocked the world by undergoing a series of Danish sex-change operations, died Wednesday afternoon in San Clemente after a long struggle with cancer. She was 62. A spokeswoman for San Clemente General Hospital said Jorgensen died there shortly before 4 p.m. Last September, after a year of chemotherapy and cobalt treatment for cancer that had begun in her bladder and had spread to her lungs, Jorgensen told a Times writer at her San Clemente home: "I think I reacted very sane and sensibly to it. I came home (after the diagnosis)
BUSINESS
June 2, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Tennessee company said Monday that it has acquired the only hospital in San Clemente in hopes of doubling the institution's business and making it profitable. NetCare Inc. purchased the money-losing 81-bed San Clemente Hospital and Medical Center after the hospital's previous operator--the hospital industry's troubled giant, Columbia/HCA Corp.--pulled out last month. Michael A. Koban Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1989 | RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writer
Celebrity and fame come many ways, but with time, even the most notorious seem to fade from public view. It was never like that with Christine Jorgensen. She had one of those magic names that always seemed to trigger a reaction in people. And if you weren't quite sure who she was, you remembered as soon as someone told you. Jorgensen's fame was rooted in an intensely personal decision that shocked the world. In 1952, after a series of operations and hormonal treatments, then 24-year-old George Jorgensen Jr. walked out of a Danish medical clinic as Christine Jorgensen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1989 | RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writer
In a manner befitting the celebrity her sex change operation brought more than 36 years ago, Christine Jorgensen requested that there be no memorial service after her death but rather a lavish party for her closest friends and relatives, her companion and roommate said Thursday. "It was show-biz as far as Chris was concerned," said Brenda Lana Smith, a former Danish honorary consul in Bermuda who lived with Jorgensen in a two-bedroom San Clemente apartment for the past 6 months.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Christine Jorgensen, the one-time George Jorgensen who 36 1/2 years ago shocked the world by undergoing a series of Danish sex-change operations, died Wednesday afternoon in San Clemente after a long struggle with cancer. She was 62. A spokeswoman for San Clemente General Hospital said Jorgensen died there shortly before 4 p.m. Last September, after a year of chemotherapy and cobalt treatment for cancer that had begun in her bladder and had spread to her lungs, Jorgensen told a Times writer at her San Clemente home: "I think I reacted very sane and sensibly to it. I came home (after the diagnosis)
BUSINESS
January 24, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
A group that once was a dark horse in the competition among local physicians to buy San Clemente General Hospital said Monday that it has received tentative approval from a bankruptcy court to buy the facility for $23 million. The group, called PACE Inc. (Physician Associates Committed to Excellence), said a few issues must be resolved before a definitive agreement can be signed with American Healthcare Management, a Dallas-based hospital chain in bankruptcy.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1988 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
A physicians' group said Monday that it has withdrawn its bid to buy control of San Clemente General Hospital because a rival group of staff doctors undermined its efforts to obtain financing for the deal. Dr. Ron McGee, leader of the thwarted group, alleged Monday that doctors backing a competing plan to buy the hospital deliberately sent patients elsewhere to discourage financing for the acquisition. McGee said patient occupancy dropped from 50 to 17 in about a week's time.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1988 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
A group of doctors at San Clemente General Hospital said Wednesday that it plans to submit a rival, second proposal to buy the hospital from its current bankrupt owner, revealing a split of opinion among the hospital staff about how the hospital should be managed in the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The City Council will consider Wednesday a zoning change to allow the building of a 136-unit assisted-living facility on 3.2 acres adjacent to San Clemente General Hospital. The three-story, L-shaped facility will house patients with Alzheimer's disease who are unable to live alone, according to city staff reports. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. at San Clemente Civic Center, 100 Avenida Presidio.
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