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San Clemente Island

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - A 40-year-old woman who became unresponsive Saturday morning while diving off San Clemente Island was airlifted by Coast Guard helicopter to San Diego for emergency care. The woman regained consciousness after being helped to the surface by other divers, but the group decided to call for help from the Coast Guard, officials said. Within minutes, an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter was hovering overhead and the crew hoist the woman aboard. She was flown to San Diego, where emergency medical personnel were waiting, the Coast Guard said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - A 40-year-old woman who became unresponsive Saturday morning while diving off San Clemente Island was airlifted by Coast Guard helicopter to San Diego for emergency care. The woman regained consciousness after being helped to the surface by other divers, but the group decided to call for help from the Coast Guard, officials said. Within minutes, an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter was hovering overhead and the crew hoist the woman aboard. She was flown to San Diego, where emergency medical personnel were waiting, the Coast Guard said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND - The unique wildlife of San Clemente Island has survived the appetites and hooves of feral livestock, bombardments by Navy vessels and wave after wave of amphibious assault vehicles storming local beaches and grassy plateaus. The operative word is "survived. " Through it all, native species clung to life on the 57-square-mile volcanic isle about 75 miles northwest of San Diego that includes the only ship-to-shore bombardment training range in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND - The unique wildlife of San Clemente Island has survived the appetites and hooves of feral livestock, bombardments by Navy vessels and wave after wave of amphibious assault vehicles storming local beaches and grassy plateaus. The operative word is "survived. " Through it all, native species clung to life on the 57-square-mile volcanic isle about 75 miles northwest of San Diego that includes the only ship-to-shore bombardment training range in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1990
Navy public works personnel spilled about 1,500 gallons of diesel fuel into the Pacific near San Clemente Island on Wednesday, the Navy reported. The spill, which apparently took place at 12:30 p.m. while workers were transferring fuel to a truck on the Navy-owned island, was not near any environmentally sensitive areas, the Navy said. About 95% of the fuel evaporated by late Wednesday afternoon, said the Navy. San Clemente Island is about 60 miles northwest of San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1987 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
A private firm's proposal to build a plant to burn toxic wastes on San Clemente Island has raised the ire of San Diego County lawmakers concerned about the potential for ocean spills and noxious smoke wafting toward shore. American Waste Energy Management Corp., a recently formed company based in Inglewood, has asked the federal government for permission to build the $50-million incineration plant on the island, 60 miles west of the county's coastline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Hark, the red-flanked bluetail sings! Yes, that red-flanked bluetail — the bird species that until this week had been spotted just once in North America outside of Alaska. Avid birders have been vocalizing like crazy about the discovery, which was made Tuesday by biologists on San Clemente Island, a 21-mile-long sliver off the Southern California coast. PHOTOS: Readers share bird images "Birders get very excited about this kind of thing," said Kimball Garrett, ornithology collections manager at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Some of the most fearsome military personnel in the world train on this rocky, windswept island: Marine infantry and Navy SEALs. But the largest mammal native to the island ? average size, 3 to 4 pounds ? is not afraid of them at all. That's a problem on a 22-mile-long island with a ship-to-shore/air-to-ground bombardment range on its south end, beaches for amphibious assault training on the north and a heavily traveled road down its spine. The San Clemente Island fox ( Urocyon littoralis )
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2009 | Tony Perry
The Coast Guard on Sunday halted its rescue effort for nine missing military air crew members from a midair collision off San Clemente Island, officials said. "I have concluded that hope is no longer viable," said Rear Adm. Joseph Castillo. The Coast Guard and Navy had searched since Thursday night for the seven crew members aboard a Coast Guard C-130 transport and the two pilots aboard a Marine Corps Super Cobra helicopter. The craft collided at 7:10 p.m. Thursday about 20 miles east of the island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2009 | Tony Perry and Daniel Weikel
Electronic warning systems and a computerized "notice to all airmen" system exist to prevent midair collisions like the one Thursday night off San Clemente Island that apparently killed nine military members. But as a Coast Guard admiral noted ruefully Friday, "No system is perfect." Even in an age of sophisticated collision-detection warning equipment, communication gear and an instantaneous message board notifying all pilots of military maneuvers, the fundamental safety procedure remains "see and avoid."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2009 | Robert J. Lopez
The U.S. Coast Guard says a Navy helicopter has crashed off the Southern California coast. Petty Officer Henry Dunphy said the Navy reported the crash about 7 p.m. on Thursday. The helicopter went down about 17 miles east of San Clemente Island, the farthest south of the Channel Islands. Coast Guard and Navy vessels are searching for the helicopter. Dunphy said he did not have any other details about the crash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | Tony Perry
If the loggerhead shrike ever leaves the endangered species list, major kudos must go to Trampas, the king stud of the songbird community on Navy-owned San Clemente Island. Hatched in captivity in 2001, at the nadir of the shrike's census, Trampas flew to freedom and began his life's work: repopulating the shrike subspecies that is found only on the island. In eight breeding seasons, Trampas has sired 62 chicks. From those chicks have come 93 grandchicks, 61 great-grandchicks and 25 great-great-grandchicks.
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